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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Arian Ward

The concept of constellations of communities is a big picture view of how communities of practice in organizations relate to one another. These communities are voluntary…

Abstract

The concept of constellations of communities is a big picture view of how communities of practice in organizations relate to one another. These communities are voluntary, and over time they form a complex, informal network of relationships, knowledge sharing, learning, and conversations that can be woven together into a powerful strategic fabric with the right kind of leadership. Like a garden, these communities must be tended and nurtured rather than commanded and controlled. The article contains examples of constellations of communities in business, non‐profit, volunteer‐oriented associations, and society at large and outlines the potential benefits of a constellation to its stakeholders.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Knowledge Advantage II (Chicago, November 1995), a conference co‐sponsored by the Strategic Leadership Forum and Ernst & Young, was a unique event designed to bring…

Abstract

Knowledge Advantage II (Chicago, November 1995), a conference co‐sponsored by the Strategic Leadership Forum and Ernst & Young, was a unique event designed to bring together leading thinkers from the managerial, academic, and consulting communities to explore the principles and applications of knowledge management in organizations. Arian Ward and Victor Leo have extensive experience with these concepts and practices in their respective firms. We offer here their lessons learned as presented at the conference.

Details

Planning Review, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0094-064X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

Robert M. Grant

In this summary of the key speakers at the Strategic Leadership Forum's 1999 Conference, the author poses answers to a number of questions:What does the year 2000 mean for…

Abstract

In this summary of the key speakers at the Strategic Leadership Forum's 1999 Conference, the author poses answers to a number of questions:What does the year 2000 mean for business enterprises? Is it a turning point in any sense beyond a calendar? What are the key uncertainties facing business leaders at this historical juncture? What are the central issues for business strategy that arise from these uncertainties? And what concepts and tools can help companies manage the transition to a new era?

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Strategy & Leadership, vol. 27 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Marilyn Norris

Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1999

ERIC G. FLAMHOLTZ and ERICA D. MAIN

We have witnessed a significant transformation in the world economy and the organisations that comprise it. The economy of old was manufacturing‐based and relied heavily…

Abstract

We have witnessed a significant transformation in the world economy and the organisations that comprise it. The economy of old was manufacturing‐based and relied heavily on tangible assets as determinants of value. In contrast, the present‐day economy is based on knowledge and information, intangible assets that are embodied in people. This shift has triggered the development of tools with which to measure these intangible assets. One accounting tool that is directly relevant to the measurement and, in turn, the management of human capital is human resource accounting. The purpose of this article is to discuss some current issues, recent advancements, and possible future directions for further development.

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Journal of Human Resource Costing & Accounting, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1401-338X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

Charles Despres and Daniele Chauvel

This article reviews developments in the field of applied knowledge management dating from 1990 and argues that a fragmented mosaic of programs and problematics currently…

Abstract

This article reviews developments in the field of applied knowledge management dating from 1990 and argues that a fragmented mosaic of programs and problematics currently exists, at various levels of incompatibility. Using a software product, we map the information space around applied knowledge management as an illustration of this basic fact. We then describe a research program that extends this logic and develop a model on four dimensions that appears to order the various programs, practices and processes in this divergent field. Implications for managers of knowledge management initiatives are discussed, and avenues for future research suggested.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1997

Colin J. Coulson‐Thomas

To assess the relevance of the growing interest in Knowledge Management, the author suggests the need to understand the contemporary context into which it is being…

Abstract

To assess the relevance of the growing interest in Knowledge Management, the author suggests the need to understand the contemporary context into which it is being introduced. For example, how does it relate to “process management” or the “learning organization”? The results of the author’s research indicates that many companies will pay a high and continuing price for an emphasis on short‐term improvements. In general, a more holistic and people‐centred approach to management that puts more emphasis on learning is required. This paper presents an overview of certain research findings that might be relevant to an assessment of Knowledge Management for the future organization.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2019

Bakhtiar Piroozi, Amjad Mohamadi-Bolbanabad, Hossein Safari, Mohammad Amerzadeh, Ghobad Moradi, Dalir Usefi, Arian Azadnia and Serajaddin Gray

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the prevalence of medication errors (MEs) and the factors affecting them among nurses of hospitals affiliated to Kurdistan…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the prevalence of medication errors (MEs) and the factors affecting them among nurses of hospitals affiliated to Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences (KUMS) in 2016.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a cross-sectional and descriptive-analytic study. In total, 503 nurses were selected using census method from six hospitals affiliated to KUMS. A self-constructed questionnaire was employed to collect information on nurses’ socio-demographic characteristics (6 items), the prevalence and type of MEs (21 items) and their perceptions about the main causes of MEs (40 items). Data were collected from August 15 to October 15, 2016. In addition, nonparametric and linear regression tests were used to describe the descriptive statistics and analyze the data.

Findings

The response rate was 73 percent and the monthly reported MEs per nurse was 6.27±11.95. Giving medication at non-scheduled time (28.4 percent), giving multiple oral medications together (22.4 percent) and giving painkillers after operation without physician’s prescription (15.3 percent) were three types of repetitive MEs, respectively. Gender, work experience, and having a second job affected the total number of MEs. “Long and unconventional nursing shifts,” “changing the dosage of medications for patients under observation due to multiple consultations and different doctors’ orders” as well as “failure to give feedback about the causes of errors to nurses by supervisors” were the three prioritized factors for MEs.

Originality/value

There is a need to reduce MEs in order to improve patient safety. It seems that in order to reduce MEs, systemic and managerial reforms such as reducing the working hours and workload of nurses, giving feedback about the causes of MEs to nurses, and using initiatives to reduce the stress in nurses are necessary.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

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Article
Publication date: 20 January 2012

Amzad Hossain

The purpose of this paper is to examine and compare the indicators of k‐economy to assess whether their status of development helps to improve such indicators in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine and compare the indicators of k‐economy to assess whether their status of development helps to improve such indicators in the SAARC. Furthermore, the study also aims to create linkage among the indicators of k‐economy, economic integration process in the SAARC, and the knowledge conversion model.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts comparative analyses of the indicators of k‐economy. Indicators are considered under three tracks such as: socio‐economic, economic and ICT infrastructure. Socio‐economic indicators – poverty index, literacy rate, public expenditure on education, R&D expenditure, enrolment of tertiary education, number of researchers in R&D, participation in international agency. Economic indicators – per‐capita real GDP, real GDP growth rate, share of GDP by sector, structure of trade, inflation and unemployment rate. ICT infrastructure indicators – telephone main lines per 100 people, cellular users per 100 people, broadband per 100 people, and internet users per 100 people. The data are obtained from publications, existing reports and web sites of international organizations.

Findings

The indicators of k‐economy demonstrate deprived developmental status with increasing trends in the SAARC member countries. As a result, SAARC demonstrates poor growth in terms of knowledge development as compared to other economic integrations in Asia such as APT. There is a considerable variation in most of the indicators among the member states as measured by CV (coefficient of variation) although they lay in low‐income county status. The people of the SAARC countries like to adopt with the ICT easily if the opportunity is provided. The study revealed that the countries in the SAARC should carefully follow the knowledge creation, conversion, implementation and reverse follow‐up process to meet specific indicator based needs of the specific sector of particular members considering their social and financial affordability in the local context.

Research limitations/implications

The study does not use the same year's data for all the indicators applied in this paper due to lack of data availability.

Practical implications

The findings of this paper will be useful to formulate effective policies to improve the indicators of k‐economy in the SAARC. This will be influential for the SAARC to be a competitive integration.

Originality/value

This study provides comparative empirical evidence of variation in the indicators of k‐economy among the SAARC member countries contribute to improve such indicators. The paper also creates linkage among the indicators of k‐economy, economic integration process in the SAARC, and the knowledge conversion model.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

Keywords

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