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Article
Publication date: 16 January 2024

Kasmad Ariansyah, Ahmad Budi Setiawan, Alfin Hikmaturokhman, Ardison Ardison and Djoko Walujo

This study aims to establish an assessment model to measure big data readiness in the public sector, specifically targeting local governments at the provincial and city/regency…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to establish an assessment model to measure big data readiness in the public sector, specifically targeting local governments at the provincial and city/regency levels. Additionally, the study aims to gain valuable insights into the readiness of selected local governments in Indonesia by using the established assessment model.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a mixed-method approach, using focus group discussions (FGDs), surveys and exploratory factor analysis (EFA) to establish the assessment model. The FGDs involve gathering perspectives on readiness variables from experts in academia, government and practice, whereas the survey collects data from a sample of selected local governments using a questionnaire developed based on the variables obtained in FGDs. The EFA is used on survey data to condense the variables into a smaller set of dimensions or factors. Ultimately, the assessment model is applied to evaluate the level of big data readiness among the selected Indonesian local governments.

Findings

FGDs identify 32 essential variables for evaluating the readiness of local governments to adopt big data. Subsequently, EFA reduces this number by five and organizes the remaining variables into four factors: big data strategy, policy and collaboration, infrastructure and human resources and data collection and utilization. The application of the assessment model reveals that the overall readiness for big data in the selected local governments is primarily moderate, with those in the Java cluster displaying higher readiness. In addition, the data collection and utilization factor achieves the highest score among the four factors.

Originality/value

This study offers an assessment model for evaluating big data readiness within local governments by combining perspectives from big data experts in academia, government and practice.

Details

Journal of Science and Technology Policy Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4620

Keywords

Open Access
Book part
Publication date: 4 May 2018

Susanne Dida, Yanti Setianti and Gadys Fatihah

Purpose – The purpose of this research was to describe the personal branding Tri Rismaharini.Design/Methodology/Approach – This study uses a qualitative method. The data were…

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this research was to describe the personal branding Tri Rismaharini.

Design/Methodology/Approach – This study uses a qualitative method. The data were obtained based on observations and interviews with the people involved in the personal Branding Tri Rismaharini.

Findings – Tri Rismaharini (Mayor of Surabaya) branding herself as the first female leader who can compete with the mayor in other cities in Indonesia. Not only that, Tri Rismaharini also received the title of World No. 3 Best Walikota in 2014, with various efforts made to create, build, organize, and lead the city of Surabaya to be more advanced than in previous years. Risma’s feminine and emotional nature is evident from news about her concern for her citizens and her tendency to use her heart while working. The nature of domestic Risma seen from the news about its performance in maintaining and maintaining cleanliness and parks in Surabaya.

Originality/Value – Nowdays, the world of politics and government not only belongs to men, but also women. Many women venture into politics, become politicians, or even government leaders. However, stereotypes referring to public doubt still exist. Women are considered not suitable to be a government leader because they are considered not able and feminine. Mass media also plays a role in the confirmation of the assumption.

Details

Proceedings of MICoMS 2017
Type: Book
ISBN:

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 17 July 2007

Kevin C. Stagl, Eduardo Salas, Michael A. Rosen, Heather A. Priest, C. Shawn Burke, Gerald F. Goodwin and Joan H. Johnston

Distributed performance arrangements are increasingly used by organizations to structure dyadic and team interactions. Unfortunately, distributed teams are no panacea. This…

Abstract

Distributed performance arrangements are increasingly used by organizations to structure dyadic and team interactions. Unfortunately, distributed teams are no panacea. This chapter reviews some of the advantages and disadvantages associated with the geographical and temporal distribution of team members. An extended discussion of the implications of distributed team performance for individual, team, and organizational decision making is provided, with particular attention paid to selected cultural factors. Best practices and key points are advanced for those stakeholders charged with offsetting the performance decrements in decision making that can result from distribution and culture.

Details

Multi-Level Issues in Organizations and Time
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1434-8

Article
Publication date: 7 February 2020

Kizito Ojilong’ Omukaga

The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of the elements of the fraud diamond theory in detecting financial statement fraud among non-financial firms in Kenya…

1441

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of the elements of the fraud diamond theory in detecting financial statement fraud among non-financial firms in Kenya. Secondary data used to calculate ratios and figures representing the study variables was collected using a checklist for each of the targeted firms listed in the Nairobi Securities Exchange in Kenya for the 2013-2017 period.

Design/methodology/approach

Secondary data used to calculate ratios and figures representing the study variables was collected using a checklist for each of the targeted firms listed in the Nairobi Securities Exchange in Kenya for the 2013-2017 period. Convenience sampling technique was used to come up with a sample size of 35 out of the targeted population of 45 non-financial firms listed in Kenya (78% representation). This sample size was representative enough of the targeted population.

Findings

The results strongly supported that all the four elements of the fraud diamond triangle influenced financial statement fraud in Kenya. However, using three parameters, namely R2, predicted sign and standard error, to compare the applicability of either the Yoon et al. (2006) or the modified Jones (1991), our study findings are mixed. It is therefore imperative that a new model should be developed in detecting earnings management in the Kenyan context. Note that including other variables will to a greater extent increase the explanatory power in detecting earnings management practiced by non-financial firms listed in Kenya.

Research limitations/implications

Use of secondary information in the study was one limitation. Certain financial information was missing from some of the targeted firms’ official websites and the Nairobi Securities Exchange research handbooks. The researcher ensured that only non-financial firms whose audited financial statements were easily accessible were included in the study. Firms whose records were not readily available were excluded from the survey.

Practical implications

Practically, this study enables regulatory authorities in Kenya to understand the extent with which each element of the fraud diamond theory could be relied on in detecting financial statement fraud. Moreover, it will advise them on the areas to lay more emphasis when attempting to detect financial statement fraud using this model.

Originality/value

The main value of this study is the determination of the key elements of the fraud diamond theory, which have influence on financial statement fraud among non-financial firms listed in Kenya.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 March 2008

William A. Gentry, Lauren S. Harris, Becca A. Baker and Jean Brittain Leslie

This paper aims to show how changes in the workplace may have coincided with shifts in the importance of managerial skills over the past 15 years and to identify managerial skills…

8100

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to show how changes in the workplace may have coincided with shifts in the importance of managerial skills over the past 15 years and to identify managerial skills needed at different levels and functions in today's work context.

Design/methodology/approach

This study, using survey methodology, is within the context of field research using 7,389 managers from 1988‐1992 and 7,410 managers from 2004‐2006.

Findings

Managerial skills important in the 1980s are relevant today. However, the importance of “relationships,” “administrative/organizational ability” and “time management” shifted over the last 15 years. This paper also identifies which managerial skills are important at different levels and across different functions of an organization in today's work environment.

Research limitations/implications

Asking managers to choose which skills are important, rather than asking how important each skill is, may be a limitation. Future research should also consider the importance of managerial skills from a boss, peer, or direct report perspective.

Practical implications

The results have implications for training and development, selection and succession planning.

Originality/value

This study is unique since it uses the opinions of practicing managers totaling more than 14,000 over two distinct time periods to determine whether certain skills important (or not important) in the past are still important (or not important) today, and whether the importance of certain managerial skills has changed over a 15‐year period, and what skills are important across managerial levels and functions in today's organizational and work context.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 December 2021

Asgar Ali, K.N. Badhani and Ashish Kumar

This study aims to investigate the risk-return trade-off in the Indian equity market at both the aggregate equity market level and in the cross-sections of stock return using…

331

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the risk-return trade-off in the Indian equity market at both the aggregate equity market level and in the cross-sections of stock return using alternative risk measures.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses weekly and monthly data of 3,085 Bombay Stock Exchange-listed stocks spanning over 20 years from January 2000 to December 2019. The study evaluates the risk-return trade-off at the aggregate equity market level using the value-weighted and the equal-weighted broader portfolios. Eight different risk proxies belonging to the conventional, downside and extreme risk categories are considered to analyse the cross-sectional risk-return relationship.

Findings

The results show a positive equity premium on the value-weighted portfolio; however, the equal-weighted portfolio of these stocks shows an average return lower than the return on the 91-day Treasury Bills. The inverted size premium mainly causes this anomaly in the Indian equity market as the small stocks have lower returns than big stocks. The study presents a strong negative risk-return relationship across different risk proxies. However, under the subsample of more liquid stocks, the low-risk anomaly regarding other risk proxies becomes moderate except the beta-anomaly. This anomalous relationship seems to be caused by small and less liquid stocks having low institutional ownership and higher short-selling constraints.

Practical implications

The findings have important implications for investors, managers and practitioners. Investors can incorporate the effects of different highlighted anomalies in their investment strategies to fetch higher returns. Managers can also use these findings in their capital budgeting decisions, resource allocations and other diverse range of direct and indirect decisions, particularly in emerging markets such as India. The findings provide insights to practitioners while valuing the firms.

Originality/value

The study is among the earlier attempts to examine the risk-return trade-off in an emerging equity market at both the aggregate equity market level and in the cross-sections of stock returns using alternative measures of risk and expected returns.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 49 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 September 2019

Jennifer Parlamis and Rebekah Dibble

Applying media synchronicity theory (MST) as a theoretical foundation, this paper aims to examine whether teams using multiple communication modes perform better on a complex…

1037

Abstract

Purpose

Applying media synchronicity theory (MST) as a theoretical foundation, this paper aims to examine whether teams using multiple communication modes perform better on a complex intra-team task than those using a single mode.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors adopted a mixed-methods explanatory design. Data were collected from 44 teams directly following participation in the Everest Leadership and Team Simulation. Teams were assigned a specific mode of communication: virtual (text-chat only), face-to-face (FTF) or dual (FTF and chat).

Findings

No significant differences in team goals achieved were found when comparing dual modes to single modes, counter to predictions based on MST. Qualitative data indicated that FTF communication is dominant and might lead to “medium inertia” when multiple modes are available. FTF teams reported higher perceptions of team effectiveness than text-chat-only teams.

Research limitations/implications

This study was conducted on a small number of teams in an artificial environment; therefore, generalizability is limited. Future research should consider other measures of team performance and test teams in a virtual setting where distance, as well as time, are factors.

Practical implications

FTF communication tends to be dominant to a point where virtual options are ignored, suggesting that greater awareness around communication processes required for complex tasks, and ways to appropriate different media for conveyance or convergence, is key to team performance.

Originality/value

This study highlights the importance of determining processes by which teams shift between media to maximize conveyance and convergence processes. Additionally, distinguishing between objective performance and perceptions of performance highlight an additional challenge for teams that can be explored.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

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