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Book part
Publication date: 28 November 2017

Arch G. Woodside

Abstract

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Trade Tales: Decoding Customers' Stories
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-279-4

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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2018

Arch George Woodside

The purpose of this paper is to describe how and why to shift away from bad science practices now dominant in research in marketing to good science practices.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe how and why to shift away from bad science practices now dominant in research in marketing to good science practices.

Design/methodology/approach

The essay includes details in theory construction and the use of symmetric tests to illustrate bad science practices. In contrast, the essay includes asymmetric case-based asymmetric theory construction and testing to illustrate good science practices.

Findings

Researchers in marketing science should not report null hypothesis significance tests. They should report somewhat precise outcome tests, avoid using multiple regression analysis (MRA) and do use Boolean-algebra-based algorithms to predict cases of interest.

Research limitations/implications

Given the widespread dominance of bad science practices (e.g. MRA and structural equation modeling), the inclusion of both bad and good science practices may be necessary during the transition years of 2015–2025 (e.g. Ordanini et al., 2014).

Practical implications

Good science practices fit reality much closer than bad science practices. Asymmetric modeling includes recognizing the separate models are necessary for positive vs negative outcomes because the antecedents of each often differ.

Originality/value

This essay presents details of why and how researchers need to embrace a new research paradigm that is helpful for ending bad science practices that are now dominant in research in marketing.

Details

Journal of Contemporary Marketing Science, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-7480

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1985

Arch G Woodside and Elizabeth J Wilson

The hypothesis is supported that substantial similarities exist in supplier choice strategies across industrialised nations. The nine studies reviewed indicate that a…

Abstract

The hypothesis is supported that substantial similarities exist in supplier choice strategies across industrialised nations. The nine studies reviewed indicate that a four‐step process is common to the majority of capital goods purchases and purchases of component parts and raw materials in some European countries and the United States

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2017

Abstract

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Consumer Behavior in Tourism and Hospitality Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-690-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1996

Arch G. Woodside

Discusses several propositions on the causes and realized strategies that are likely to be found in different industrial marketing‐purchasing situations involving…

Abstract

Discusses several propositions on the causes and realized strategies that are likely to be found in different industrial marketing‐purchasing situations involving rejecting versus accepting superior technological innovations ‐ innovations independently verified to provide superior operating characteristics and lower total costs compared to currently used products and manufacturing processes. Develops a theory of customer rejection of superior manufacturing technologies and product‐service innovations as a vehicle for summarizing a set of related propositions explaining such behavior. Reviews suggestions for empirical research to test the theory.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 11 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2019

Arch G. Woodside, Carol M. Megehee, Lars Isaksson and Graham Ferguson

This paper aims to apply complexity theory tenets to deepen understanding, explanation and prediction of how configurations of national cultures and need motivations…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to apply complexity theory tenets to deepen understanding, explanation and prediction of how configurations of national cultures and need motivations influence national entrepreneurial and innovation behavior and nations’ quality-of-life (QOL). Also, the study examines whether or not high national ethical behavior is sufficient for indicating nations high in quality-of-life.

Design/methodology/approach

Applying core tenets of complexity theory, the study constructs asymmetric, case-based (nations), explanations and predictive models of cultures’ consequences (via Schwartz’s seven value dimensions) and implicit need motivations (via McClelland’s three need motivations) indicating national entrepreneur and innovation activities and subsequent national quality-of-life and ethical behavior. The study includes testing configurational models empirically for predictive accuracy. The empirical examination is for a set of data for 24 nations in Asia, Europe, North and South America and the South Pacific.

Findings

The findings confirm the usefulness of applying complexity theory to learn how culture and motivation configurations support versus have negative consequences on nations’ entrepreneurship, innovation and human well-being. Nurturing of entrepreneur activities supports the nurturing of enterprise innovation activity and their joint occurrence indicates nations achieving high quality-of-life. The findings advance the perspective that different sets of cultural value configurations indicate nations high versus low in entrepreneur and innovation activities.

Practical implications

High entrepreneur activities without high innovation activity are insufficient for achieving high national quality-of-life. Achieving high ethical behavior supports high quality-of-life.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to apply complexity theory tenets in the field of entrepreneurship research. The study here advances the perspective that case-based asymmetric modeling of recipes is necessary to explain and predict entrepreneur activities and outcomes rather than examining whether variable relationships are statistically significant from zero.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Abstract

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Designing winning products
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-682-4

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Article
Publication date: 31 January 2020

Arch G. Woodside, Marylouise Caldwell and Jennifer Rebecca Calhoun

This study defines service breakdowns, service breakdown prevention, and “servicide” as they relate to service-dominant logic. The study reviews relevant relevant…

Abstract

Purpose

This study defines service breakdowns, service breakdown prevention, and “servicide” as they relate to service-dominant logic. The study reviews relevant relevant literature on these three topics. This study categorizes real-life examples into five levels of dramatic turns toward service degradations and breakdowns that range from customer being aware but not mentioning service inadequacy to the service breakdown resulting in death of the customer or service provider. Taking initial steps in developing dramatic turn theory and improving the practice of service breakdown prevention are the major contributions of this study.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is a conceptual contribution that includes a dramatic turn role-playing exercise (at category 4 among five categories of dramatic turns for pedagogical/on-site enacting/practicing and training of service professionals. The study emphasizes and shows how to create and enact role-playing scenarios to increase requisite variety, provide training modules and increase skills/expertise in service enactment contexts.

Findings

Before explicit reviewing of the dramatic-turn performances, some of the participants as actors as well as audience members in role-play dramatic turns were quick to blame the customer behavior as the principal cause for the service breakdown. The study’s exposition stresses prevention of negative dramatic turns follows from experiencing and coaching a wide variety of customer and server interactions – achieving “richness” in enactments.

Research limitations/implications

Research on service breakdown prevention needs to include field experiments on the efficacy of training programs for effective management of dramatic turns.

Practical implications

Training of service workers and service managers in experiencing/participating in dramatic turns is likely to be beneficial in reducing the severe adverse outcomes and unintended consequences of service breakdowns. Prevention, not only service failure recovery, needs to be an explicit focus in hospitality management training and assessment.

Social implications

This study suggests tools and procedures to reduce the instances of the need for service breakdown recoveries.

Originality/value

The study calls attention and contributes a way forward in managing dramatic turns in hospitality service contexts. The study provides a nascent configurational theoretical foundation of dramatic-turn propositions. Given the severity of financial costs and loss of brand/firm reputation following the occurrence of extreme dramatic turns, a research focus on service breakdown prevention is necessary.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Arch G. Woodside

This introductory paper aims to offer a rudimentary model that describes the antecedent recipes for creating native-visitors. The paper describes what is unique and…

Abstract

Purpose

This introductory paper aims to offer a rudimentary model that describes the antecedent recipes for creating native-visitors. The paper describes what is unique and valuable about the seven articles that follow in their descriptions and explanations of the behavior of native-tourists. This special issue is to honor the originality and value of the contributions of tourism research’s leading critic, John Urry.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a paradigm that includes eight profiles of tourists identified by low/high conjunctions of knowledge, training and authentication of performances of tourism places. The study calls for a normative stance that tourists should develop a sense of obligation to learn before visiting to enrich understanding of what they are seeing and to reduce the negative outcomes of the tourist gaze. The method includes describing the unique and valuable contributions in each of the seven following articles in the issue.

Findings

The analysis and outcomes are viewable best as propositions from a thought experiment. The seven articles that follow the introduction are appropriate data for a meta-review of the development of new meanings of tourism generated from the concept of native-tourist.

Research limitations/implications

This study may spur necessary additional work to confirm that native-tourists do interpret performing tourist places differently and more richly than naïve tourists.

Originality/value

The article is high in originality in establishing the benefits from studying native-tourists as unique contributors to clarifying and deepening the meanings of tourism drama enactments.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

James Po-Hsun Hsiao, Chyi Jaw, Tzung-Cheng (T.C.) Huan and Arch G. Woodside

This paper aims to advance a configural asymmetric theory of the complex antecedents to hospitality employee happiness-at-work and managers’ assessments of employees…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to advance a configural asymmetric theory of the complex antecedents to hospitality employee happiness-at-work and managers’ assessments of employees’ quality of work performance. The study transcends variable and case-level analyses to go beyond prior statistical findings of small-to-medium effect sizes of happiness–performance relationships; the study here identifies antecedent paths involving high-versus-low happy employees associating with high-versus-low managers’ assessments of these employees’ performances.

Design/methodology/approach

The study merges data from surveys of employees (n = 247) and surveys completed by their managers (n = 43) and by using qualitative comparative analysis via the software program, fsQCA.com. The study analyzes data from Janfusan Fancyworld, the largest (in revenues and number of employees) tourism business group in Taiwan; Janfusan Fancyworld includes tourist hotels, amusement parks, restaurants and additional firms in related service sectors.

Findings

The findings support the four tenets of configural analysis and theory construction: recognize equifinality of different solutions for the same outcome, test for asymmetric solutions, test for causal asymmetric outcomes for very high versus very low happiness and work performance and embrace complexity.

Research limitations/implications

Additional research in other firms and additional countries is necessary to confirm the usefulness of examining algorithms for predicting very high (low) happiness and very high (low) quality of work performance. The implications are substantial that configural theory and research will resolve perplexing happiness–performance conundrums.

Practical implications

The study provides useful case-level algorithms involving employees’ demographic characteristics and their assessments of work facet-specifics which are useful for explaining very high happiness-at-work and high quality of work performance (as assessed by managers) – as well as algorithms explaining very low happiness and very low quality of work performance.

Originality/value

The study is the first to propose and test the tenets of configural theory in the context of hospitality frontline service employees’ happiness-at-work and managers’ assessments of these employees’ quality of work performances.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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