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Article
Publication date: 3 December 2020

Larissa von Alberti-Alhtaybat, Zaidoon Alhatabat and Khaldoon Al-Htaybat

The current study aims to investigate the development of the sustainability habitus in the Arab Middle East (ME) based on the pioneer case organisation, Aramex, which has…

Abstract

Purpose

The current study aims to investigate the development of the sustainability habitus in the Arab Middle East (ME) based on the pioneer case organisation, Aramex, which has been the pioneer of sustainability practices and reporting. The context of the Arab region, as well as the global logistics sector, has significantly influenced the development of sustainable development at Aramex, as illustrated by their sustainability and integrated reports.

Design/methodology/approach

The research approach of the current study is qualitative on the basis of open and selective coding techniques. The case organisation’s annual sustainability and integrated reports and additional relevant publicised information are analysed. Using publicised information from different sources increases triangulation and allows for more reliable findings. The theoretical context is Bourdieu’s habitus and field, which also reflects the interplay between habitus and field, and how Aramex’s sustainability practices and reports are being constructed.

Findings

The findings reflect Aramex’s sustainability practices and related reporting, subsumed in its organisational sustainability habitus. They span the sustainability reporting endeavours of the case organisation, commencing with the first sustainability report in 2006 until the most recent annual integrated report in 2018. Aramex is the precursor of sustainability and integrated reporting (IR) in the ME and is a significant contributor to developing a sustainability habitus in the region. The findings outline various elements of their reports as evidence of sustainability practices and reporting in the ME and the global logistics sector and as an illustration of the developing sustainability habitus.

Originality/value

This study reviews the original case of Aramex and its sustainability and IR practices. It also discusses the company’s practices and reporting details with regard to its organisational sustainability habitus and interplay with the local, Arab World and global, logistics sector, fields.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-372X

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 22 June 2015

Melodena Stephens Balakrishnan

Aramex PJSC: carving a competitive advantage in the global logistics and express transportation service industry.

Abstract

Title

Aramex PJSC: carving a competitive advantage in the global logistics and express transportation service industry.

Subject area

Entrepreneurship, International Business, Strategy.

Study level/applicability

Post-graduates, Practitioners.

Case overview

This case chronicles the Aramex PJSC story of entrepreneur Fadi Gandhour. The case looks at the new start-up, its growth and financing plans for expansion and how it got a competitive advantage in an industry dominated by big players. Aramex, as of 2012, was the only Arab company to have successfully listed on the NASDAQ Stock Exchange. After 30 years at the helm of the company, Fadi Ghandour, the Chief Executive Officer (CEO), was stepping down and was being succeeded by regional head, Hussein Hachem, the CEO of Middle East and Africa. Aramex had a competitive edge in emerging markets, and Fadi and Hussein knew that the route to sustainable growth was to capitalize on this opportunity using organic growth, acquisitions and strategic alliances.

Expected learning outcomes

Strategy included looking at gaining a competitive advantage in the Middle East, North Africa, South Asia and other emerging markets. Lessons are provided on capitalization of opportunity, funding and creating an organization culture that is sustainable and reflects the Founder's ideal.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 1 October 2011

Melodena Stephens Balakrishnan and Ian Michael

Strategic stakeholder engagement, entrepreneurialism, ecosystem, corporate social responsibility, event management, branding, marketing strategy.

Abstract

Subject area

Strategic stakeholder engagement, entrepreneurialism, ecosystem, corporate social responsibility, event management, branding, marketing strategy.

Study level/applicability

Post-graduate level, practitioners interested in MENSA Region, entrepreneurship policy makers and NGOs.

Case overview

Abraaj Capital Ltd (Abraaj), a highly reputed private equity investment and management company, strongly believed in corporate social responsibility, strategic stakeholder engagement and entrepreneurship ecosystem development. In November, 2010, Abraaj held the “Celebration of Entrepreneurship” (CoE) a two-day free entrepreneur event, in Dubai. CoE was attended by more than 2,400 participants. The purpose of CoE was to contribute to building an entrepreneurship ecosystem in the Middle East North Africa South Asia region (MENASA). Based on participant feedback, CoE Outcomes and stakeholder feedback, the event was very successful.

This case is a good example of community engagement and showcases entrepreneurship ecosystem development. This case also highlights the challenges of putting together a signature event in a very short time frame. The future management dilemmas are also raised on various issues like whether to make this successful event a regular part of their organizational activities, and issues concerning the funding of such events. This case can be used to teach event management, branding, marketing strategy, CSR and entrepreneurship (from the ecosystem point of view). It will appeal to both educationalists and practitioners interested in the MENASA region, policy makers who facilitate entrepreneurship, CSR managers, event management companies and marketing specialist. It can be used to teach both undergraduate and postgraduate courses.

Expected learning outcomes

Strategy students can focus on marketing and branding strategies; like stakeholder engagement, internal marketing, social media, positioning and brand architecture. Student of event management can learn about prioritizing, adaptability, funding and the complexity of layering a program.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes, videos.

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Case study
Publication date: 16 October 2015

Hala Khayr Yaacoub, Shaza Abdul Aziz, Ramona Wehbeh and Rania El Debs

This case gives readers the opportunity to think about strategies employed in the postal sector amid sector, technological, national and global challenges. It highlights…

Abstract

Subject area

This case gives readers the opportunity to think about strategies employed in the postal sector amid sector, technological, national and global challenges. It highlights the importance of thinking about real options, and real solutions to counter the failures of the past and the uncertainties of the future.

Study level/applicability

The case will be particularly useful for master's degrees, Master of Business Administration, doctorate students or undergraduate specialized courses of strategy, public sector management and privatization.

Case overview

This case study aims to analyze the manner in which LibanPost transformed itself from a government bureaucracy to a commercial company and how, through diversification, it was transformed from a traditional postal operator to a high-end service provider. In addition, it attempts to examine the stages that have led to LibanPost's success, shedding the light on the major barriers and enablers for its reform.

Expected learning outcomes

The students will be able to examine how a privately owned postal company succeeded in transforming a courier company from a bureaucratic public administration incurring substantial losses to a profitable commercial company, through privatization, and grasp the major success barriers and enablers for LibanPost, while exploring the reasons behind the failure of the foreign–national partnership.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 5 no. 6
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 July 2016

Robert Grosse

Over time the countries characterized as “emerging” change, and some of the companies from these countries become world leaders even as many of those from traditional…

Abstract

Purpose

Over time the countries characterized as “emerging” change, and some of the companies from these countries become world leaders even as many of those from traditional economic powers fade. There is nothing guaranteed about success of companies from emerging markets (EMs), other than the fact that some of the firms that do survive will be among the success stories of the future. The purpose of this paper is to explore two questions: what enables companies from EMs to compete with existing firms? Is there a conceptual structure that is best for analyzing these firms and their strategies?

Design/methodology/approach

This paper discusses the strengths of EM multinational enterprises (MNEs) from the perspective of Dunning’s eclectic view, and gives four detailed examples of companies from this perspective.

Findings

It is suggested that while the eclectic view offers excellent insight into EM MNEs, an analysis of their strategies and policy implications requires further perspective such as through the global value-added chain.

Research limitations/implications

No single model will capture all of the important features of EM MNEs, but Dunning’s view and the global value-added chain are good tools.

Practical implications

Hopefully, both research analysts and company managers will be able to utilize the view presented here to better manage/understand EM MNEs.

Originality/value

This view demonstrates a mechanism for exploring key elements of EM MNEs and by moving to the global value-added chain additional, original perspective is gained.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2018

Ismail Abushaikha

The purpose of this paper is to explore why and how firms with logistics-intensive operations such as fast-moving consumer good (FMCG) distributors benefit from residing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore why and how firms with logistics-intensive operations such as fast-moving consumer good (FMCG) distributors benefit from residing in logistics clusters. In particular, this study seeks to fill a gap in the understanding of how logistics clustering may influence FMCG firms’ distribution capabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

Three case studies of FMCG distributors geographically agglomerated within Q Logistics Cluster in Jordan serve to elaborate the existing theory of clustering. Data were collected from 24 interviews as well as observational evidence of the FMCG distributors’ outbound logistics operations. The unit of analysis was the interaction between FMCG distributors and other agents in the logistics cluster.

Findings

FMCG distributors tend to gravitate to clusters where logistics service providers and other FMCG firms co-locate. FMCG distributors interact intensively and benefit greatly from building ties with non-competitor distributors in a cluster. Informal personal relations, collaborative activities and knowledge sharing, learning opportunities and resource availability were found to act as mechanisms for generating distribution capabilities within a logistics cluster.

Practical implications

This study provides practical implications for FMCG logistics and distribution managers who make distribution centre (DC) location decisions. The study provides such managers and their firms with a deeper understanding of the importance of co-locating DCs in logistics clusters, and may help them in designing their supply networks.

Originality/value

This is the first scholarly work to uncover the various ways in which FMCG distributors benefit from logistics clustering and explain why they may differ in performance, building on observations of their capabilities. The study provides insight from an emerging market and encourages future researchers to conduct further studies on logistics clustering in order to bring relevant theory forward.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 46 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 June 2021

Alessandro Lai and Riccardo Stacchezzini

This paper aims to trace subsequent steps of the sustainability reporting evolution in terms of changes in the organisation fields and professional jurisdictions involved…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to trace subsequent steps of the sustainability reporting evolution in terms of changes in the organisation fields and professional jurisdictions involved. As such, it highlights the (interrelated) organisational and professional challenges associated with the progressive incorporation of “sustainability” within corporate reporting.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on Suddaby and Viale’s (2011) theorisation of how professionals reshape organisational fields to highlight how organisational spaces, actors, rules and professional capital evolve alongside the incorporation of sustainability within corporate reporting.

Findings

The paper shows organisational spaces, actors, rules and professional capital mobilised during the recent evolution of sustainability reporting, starting from a period in which there was no space for sustainability, to more recent periods in which sustainability gained increasing momentum beyond initial niches, and culminating in more integrated forms of sustainability reporting.

Research limitations/implications

Although the analysis is limited to empirical evidence collected by prior research and practice on sustainability reporting, the paper offers a view to imagine how the incorporation of sustainability within corporate reporting relies on and affects organisational fields and professional jurisdictions.

Originality/value

The paper offers a lens to interpret corporate and professional challenges associated with the more recent evolutions of sustainability reporting practice and standard setting. It also allows framing the papers accepted in the special issue on “new challenges in sustainability reporting” and concludes by suggesting an agenda for future research.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-372X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2020

Mark E. Mendenhall

Hal Gregersen is one of the pioneers of the field of global leadership. Along with J. Stewart Black and Allen Morrison he created one of the early foundational competency…

Abstract

Hal Gregersen is one of the pioneers of the field of global leadership. Along with J. Stewart Black and Allen Morrison he created one of the early foundational competency models in the field that was published in their book, Global Explorers: The Next Generation of Leaders (1999). Since that time, Hal has studied the skills associated with innovative leadership with Clayton Christensen and Jeff Dyer. A good introduction to this research is their award-winning book, The Innovator's DNA: Mastering the Five Skills of Disruptive Innovators (2011). His most recent book, Questions are the Answer: A Breakthrough Approach to Your Most Vexing Problems at Work and in Life (2018), explores the art of questioning – a skill he argues is critical to leadership productivity. We were curious about Hal's research journey from the study of global leaders to his current research focus – the power of questions – and he graciously agreed to be interviewed for this volume of Advances in Global Leadership. Hal is a Senior Lecturer in Leadership and Innovation at the MIT Sloan School of Management. Before joining MIT, he taught at INSEAD, London Business School, Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College, Brigham Young University, and in Finland as a Fulbright Fellow.

Details

Advances in Global Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-592-4

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 July 2018

Jean-François Hennart

The purpose of this paper is to show that existing theories, principally Dunning’s OLI model, Mathews LLL model and Rugman’s version of internalization theory are unable…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show that existing theories, principally Dunning’s OLI model, Mathews LLL model and Rugman’s version of internalization theory are unable to explain the rise of emerging market multinationals (EMNEs). The reason is that they over-emphasize the strategic importance of intangibles and ignore that of complementary local assets. Taking complementary local assets into account makes it possible to understand why EMNEs are able to finance their intangible-buying sprees and, often with the help of their governments, to swap market access for technology.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper based on the bundling model (JIBS 2009) and backed by the case histories of four EMNEs.

Findings

The author shows that EMNEs have much better prospects vis-à-vis established MNEs than generally thought in Western Europe and the USA and that they will become serious competitors.

Originality/value

This is, as far as the author knows, the first explanation of why EMNEs have the bargaining power and the resources necessary to swap or buy technology from established MNEs.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2019

Khaled Hutaibat

This study aims to illustrate an interactive project in an advanced accounting course at a Middle Eastern higher education institution, which introduced students to…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to illustrate an interactive project in an advanced accounting course at a Middle Eastern higher education institution, which introduced students to practical/applied financial and managerial accounting and sustainability reporting and created an element of cognitive dissonance with regard to their financial reporting-biased prior knowledge.

Design/methodology/approach

Groups are formed that create fictitious companies and then prepare an annual report for this company. Part of the project is a critical reflection on the experience afterwards. Students needed to critically reflect on their learning experience as part of the project assessment to fulfil the required learning outcomes, as constructive learning needs reflection.

Findings

This project introduced students to practical/applied financial and managerial accounting and sustainability reporting and created an element of cognitive dissonance with regard to their financial reporting-biased prior knowledge. While some students considered the project on financial/managerial accounting and sustainability reporting a beneficial undertaking and felt their disciplinary worldview challenged, others thought it was interesting but still preferred to remain with the primarily financial focus of their discipline.

Originality/value

The project was undertaken to allow students to engage with their disciplinary material, both conventional and sustainability reporting-related, in a constructive learning manner.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

Keywords

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