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Article
Publication date: 31 July 2009

Vincent Kotwicki and Zaher Al Sulaimani

The purpose of this paper is to look into climate and climate change in a wider setting ranging from geological time through historical to instrumental records.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to look into climate and climate change in a wider setting ranging from geological time through historical to instrumental records.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors give an overview of the past, present, and future climates and the status of water resources of the Arabian Peninsula, and describe climatic forcings that shape the current climate, and the variables that are most prone to the change of existing atmospheric conditions.

Findings

Present weather patterns of the Peninsula are governed by Hadley circulation, and modulated by El Niño – southeastern oscillation, PDO, NAO, and IOO. The process of aridification is proceeding.

Originality/value

The global assessment of the imminent climate change is streamlined into predictions that are relevant for the Arabian Peninsula. Conclusions are drawn on the need for extended research effort based in countries of the Arabian Peninsula for the optimal preparation of management actions to tackle both climate change and resulting water resources issues in the region.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2013

Romie Frederick Littrell and Andy Bertsch

The purpose of this paper is to address issues relating to the United Nations Millennium Development Goals (UNMDG) in the Middle East, analysing socio‐cultural issues

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address issues relating to the United Nations Millennium Development Goals (UNMDG) in the Middle East, analysing socio‐cultural issues having direct relevance to the region's progress toward “Promote Gender Equality and Empower Women”.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors employ meta‐analyses with data from the United Nations, the Arab Human Development Report, and various sources of measurement of national means for Hofstede's five‐dimensional model of cultural value.

Findings

The authors find that the percentage of women in employment, excluding the agricultural sector, in their sample of Middle East countries has declined since 2000, while in the samples of other Muslim‐majority and all other countries the percentage employed has increased.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of the authors' research are that complete sets of data for women in employment are not available for all years for all countries in their samples.

Practical implications

Implications for practice for governments and businesses in Middle East countries are that women are a valuable economic resource which is being excluded from contribution and for the past decade the change in the Middle East has been in a negative direction.

Social implications

The economic contributions and rights of women in the Middle East lag behind most of the developed and developing nations, including other Muslim‐majority nations.

Originality/value

This study provides empirical evidence from publicly available data concerning the employment status of women in Middle Eastern nations. The authors found no similar empirical studies in the literature. The study is of value to planners and policy‐makers in business, government, and non‐governmental organisations.

Details

Foresight, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 12 July 2017

Mike Rosenberg

Abstract

Details

Strategy and Geopolitics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-568-9

Content available
Article
Publication date: 8 February 2021

Yuanzhuo Zhu, Zhihua Zhang and M. James C. Crabbe

Climatic extreme events are predicted to occur more frequently and intensely and will significantly threat the living of residents in arid and semi-arid regions…

Abstract

Purpose

Climatic extreme events are predicted to occur more frequently and intensely and will significantly threat the living of residents in arid and semi-arid regions. Therefore, this study aims to assess climatic extremes’ response to the emerging climate change mitigation strategy using a marine cloud brightening (MCB) scheme.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on Hadley Centre Global Environmental Model version 2-Earth System model simulations of a MCB scheme, this study used six climatic extreme indices [i.e. the hottest days (TXx), the coolest nights (TNn), the warm spell duration (WSDI), the cold spell duration (CSDI), the consecutive dry days (CDD) and wettest consecutive five days (RX5day)] to analyze spatiotemporal evolution of climate extreme events in the arid Sahara-Sahel-Arabian Peninsula Zone with and without MCB implementation.

Findings

Compared with a Representative Concentration Pathways 4.5 scenario, from 2030 to 2059, implementation of MCB is predicted to decrease the mean annual TXx and TNn indices by 0.4–1.7 and 0.3–2.1°C, respectively, for most of the Sahara-Sahel-Arabian Peninsula zone. It would also shorten the mean annual WSDI index by 118–183 days and the mean annual CSDI index by only 1–3 days, especially in the southern Sahara-Sahel-Arabian Peninsula zone. In terms of extreme precipitation, MCB could also decrease the mean annual CDD index by 5–25 days in the whole Sahara and Sahel belt and increase the mean annual RX5day index by approximately 10 mm in the east part of the Sahel belt during 2030–2059.

Originality/value

The results provide the first insights into the impacts of MCB on extreme climate in the arid Sahara-Sahel-Arabian Peninsula zone.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2013

Kheir Al-Kodmany and Mir M. Ali

Globalization has supported the exportation of exotic design and construction of many buildings including skyscrapers. In the past two decades skyscrapers have…

Abstract

Globalization has supported the exportation of exotic design and construction of many buildings including skyscrapers. In the past two decades skyscrapers have proliferated across cities all over the world, particularly those in the Arabian Peninsula. Because of their massive bulk and soaring height, these skyscrapers have dramatically altered the urban landscape and city identity. This paper examines the role of skyscrapers in supporting place identity in the Arabian Peninsula. Through case studies, the paper describes and evaluates skyscraper projects. While the “imported” iconic skyscrapers with their flamboyant forms have been transformative in re-imaging cities and their skylines, many of these have been transplanted to these cities with little consideration for local heritage and culture.

Details

Open House International, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2013

Ashraf M. Salama and Florian Wiedmann

Covering about three million square kilometres, the Arabian Peninsula is mainly a diverse landscape of hot humid sandy coasts, arid desert, sparse scrubland, stone-strewn…

Abstract

Covering about three million square kilometres, the Arabian Peninsula is mainly a diverse landscape of hot humid sandy coasts, arid desert, sparse scrubland, stone-strewn plains, and lush oases, as well as rocky and sometimes fertile mountain highlands and valleys. In addition to the indigenous local populace, the population is composed of large groups of expatriate Arabs and Asians, in addition to smaller groups of Europeans and North Americans; these expatriate groups represent a major workforce community of skilled professionals and semi-skilled or unskilled labourers from over sixty countries. The region's contemporary economy, dominated by the production of oil and natural gas has created unprecedented wealth, which in turn has led to a momentous surge in intensive infrastructural development and the construction of new environments (Wiedmann, 2012). The ensuing impact of this fast track development on the built environment, in conjunction with the continuous and seemingly frantic quest for establishing unique urban identities (Salama, 2012), is seen as a trigger for introducing this special edition of Open House International.

Details

Open House International, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2008

Christophe Tourenq and Frédéric Launay

The purpose of the paper is to show that the Arabian Peninsula, and the United Arab Emirates in particular, has not been spared by the trends of biodiversity loss observed…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to show that the Arabian Peninsula, and the United Arab Emirates in particular, has not been spared by the trends of biodiversity loss observed on the world scale. The authors aim to present a rapid review of the challenges facing the biodiversity in the UAE and the solutions that this young country proposes to counteract the erosion of its biodiversity.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors gathered and compiled published and unpublished information from governmental and non‐governmental sources.

Findings

Despite being regarded as a vast desertic and unfertile area with one of the lowest human populations in the world, the UAE hosts a unique and remarkably adapted fauna and flora. Adding to natural causes (drought), the main threats facing biodiversity identified were: coastal development and urbanisation, as well as over‐exploitation of natural resources (fishing, hunting, grazing and water extraction) that are linked with the tremendous population increase and changes in lifestyle. Traditional systems of resource management in the UAE have been abandoned. Over the last few decades, the UAE has lost most of its big fauna and is witnessing the remaining Arabian leopard, Mountain Gazelle, Arabian Tahr, Arabian Sailfish, groupers and shark populations at the brink of extinction.

Originality/value

The paper proposes the inclusion of environmental issues in the development planning (with proper environment impact assessments), the involvement of local communities in the decision making and the improvement of federal and international trans‐boundaries collaborations. Highlights that an urgent step would be the implementation of integrated costal management zoning to stop the current extent of coastal development that contributes through physical alteration of habitats to the disappearance of key resources and habitats.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2013

Marilyn R. Davis and Aysha Abdulla Hassan Ali Hassan

This chapter reports on one faculty member’s experience introducing a service learning component into a sequence of required courses in a College of education at a…

Abstract

This chapter reports on one faculty member’s experience introducing a service learning component into a sequence of required courses in a College of education at a University in the United Arab Emirates. This study identifies local issues associated with introducing service learning into the curriculum and examines students’ perceptions of self, attitudes toward service to others, and service as leadership and outcomes. Relatively little evidence exists in the Middle East of the actual processes involved in developing and implementing service learning programs and the relevant connections that can be made to Islamic principles for community advocacy and leadership.

Details

Collective Efficacy: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on International Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-680-4

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Anwar Ul-Hamid, Luai M. Al-Hems, Abdul Quddus, Abdulrashid I. Muhammed and Huseyin Saricimen

The purpose of this study was to determine the atmospheric corrosion behavior of aluminium (Al) exposed to the industrial and coastal environments of northeastern Arabian

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to determine the atmospheric corrosion behavior of aluminium (Al) exposed to the industrial and coastal environments of northeastern Arabian Peninsula for a period of 15 months.

Design/methodology/approach

The samples were exposed under atmospheric, underground and splatter zone conditions at the coastal region. Soil, groundwater, seawater and air particulate samples obtained from the exposure site were analyzed. Secondary electron microscopy was used to identify and study the microstructural features of the corrosion products formed at the surface of the test coupons. The corrosion rates of the samples were determined by the weight loss method.

Findings

The results showed that Al exhibited a moderate corrosion rate despite high degree of variation in temperature and humidity and large concentrations of chloride and sulfate in this region. Splatter zone environment was the most corrosive because of high chloride concentrations in seawater and the alternating wetting–drying cycles.

Originality/value

In this paper, corrosion of Al was evaluated in atmospheric, soil and splatter zone conditions along the northeastern coast of Arabian Peninsula and was also compared with the results of the test reported for other international locations.

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 64 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1984

J.S. Birks and J.A. Rimmer

This article discusses contemporary concepts and systems of education and training in the oil rich states of the Arabian peninsula. The argument focuses upon how education…

Abstract

This article discusses contemporary concepts and systems of education and training in the oil rich states of the Arabian peninsula. The argument focuses upon how education and training affect and are affected by economic and social development in these oil‐exporting states. The speed of change in the states of Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) — facilitated by receipt of oil revenues — makes analysis of educational development especially interesting in itself. The timeliness of such a discussion is enhanced by the fact that, following between one and three decades of development, these states are beginning to evaluate, rather than forge on with expansionism. Indeed, falling world crude oil prices might well oblige some thoughtful consolidation.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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