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1 – 10 of over 26000
Article
Publication date: 1 July 1998

Hassan Mahomed and Max O. Bachmann

Long waiting times are a serious problem for patients using urban health centres in developing countries. A block appointment system was introduced and evaluated in a…

329

Abstract

Long waiting times are a serious problem for patients using urban health centres in developing countries. A block appointment system was introduced and evaluated in a large South African health centre. Waiting times of all patients were measured over a one‐week period before and after the implementation of appointments. Focus group and individual interviews were conducted with staff and patients. After introducing appointments, patients with acute and chronic illnesses and having appointments had significantly shorter waits than similar patients without appointments (difference in median waits: 63 and 39 minutes respectively). Appointments had no benefits for patients not seeing doctors or collecting repeat medication. There was, however, an overall increase in patients’ waiting times after introducing the system, mainly due to one atypical day in the follow‐up study. Focus groups and interviews revealed that staff were sceptical at baseline but at follow‐up were positive about the system. Patients were enthusiastic about the appointment system at all stages. The study shows that block appointments can reduce patient waiting times for acute patients, but may not be suitable for all patients. Staff and patients had different views, which converged with experience of the new system.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 April 2022

Xiaoyan Xu, Miao Hu and Xiaodong Li

This study aims to help businesses cope with consumers' no-show behaviour from a multistage perspective. It specifically identifies no-show reasons at each stage of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to help businesses cope with consumers' no-show behaviour from a multistage perspective. It specifically identifies no-show reasons at each stage of appointment services and proposes the corresponding coping strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

By focusing on an outpatient appointment service, we interviewed 921 no-show patients to extract no-show reasons, invited 18 hospital managers to propose coping strategies for these reasons using a Delphi method and evaluated the proposed strategies based on EDAS (Evaluation based on Distance from Average Solution).

Findings

The results reveal ten reasons for no-show behaviour (i.e. system service quality, overuse, did not know the appointment, self-judgment, forget, waiting time, lateness, uncontrollable problems, time conflict and service coordination), which have nine coping strategy themes (i.e. prepayment, system intelligence, target, subjective norm, system integration, ease of navigation, reminder, confirmation and cancellation). We classify the ten reasons and nine themes into scheduling, waiting and execution stages of an appointment service.

Originality/value

This study provides a package of coping strategies for no-show behaviour to deal with no-show reasons at each appointment service stage. It also extends the research in pre-service management through appointment services.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 6 October 2014

Angela Wroblewski

Women have conquered the universities but their way into top positions is still stopped by a class ceiling. Focusing appointment procedures for full professors the chapter…

Abstract

Background

Women have conquered the universities but their way into top positions is still stopped by a class ceiling. Focusing appointment procedures for full professors the chapter examines why policies aiming at gendered practices have only shown moderate success.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis follows a praxeological approach and draws on material derived from case studies covering all 22 universities in Austria. The aim of these case studies was to analyze the implementation of a new legal framework for appointment procedures at Austrian universities.

Findings

In this chapter, the effects of specific measures to tackle gender bias in appointment procedures for full professors in the Austrian context are analyzed. It is evident that despite gender awareness and a comprehensive set of regulations, regularly traditional practices remain stable and unreflected with regard to an inherent gender bias. The analysis presented thus reveals the limitations of existing equality policies. We can assume that reflexivity is a precondition for a change of unreflected practices, but does not form a part of existing policies.

Practical implications

We conclude that policies aimed at changing gendered practices have to (1) built up gender awareness as well as gender competence and (2) encourage reflexivity as well as agency among all stakeholders involved in a practice. Although there are cases where reflexivity arises from an individual conviction with regard to equality, most stakeholders have to be convinced – or even forced – by a superior authority to change their practices. Such a change can be forced by legal obligation or set down as a clear requirement by university management. It becomes evident that any guideline or regulation addressing gendered practices have to be accompanied by features that create room for reflection and reflexivity.

Details

Gender Transformation in the Academy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-070-4

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 January 2022

Kathy Brock and Robert P. Shepherd

According to the traditional view of public administration, a critical component of good policy formulation is the provision of frank and fearless advice to elected…

Abstract

Purpose

According to the traditional view of public administration, a critical component of good policy formulation is the provision of frank and fearless advice to elected decision-makers. This advice can be provided by permanent public officials or by the people selected by the elected governments to fill key and continuing posts. However, there are major questions as to whether new Governor-in-Council (GIC) appointment processes rooted in new public governance (NPG) are yielding the expected results promised, such as less partisanism, as a consideration for appointment.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a mixed methods approach to examine the GIC process as it is used in Canada. In using these methods, the authors employed interviews with senior officials, governmental documents review and expert validation interviews to triangulate its main findings.

Findings

The paper uses the case of the revised appointment process for GIC appointments in Canada and suggests that the new arrangements do not deliver on merit-based criteria that ensures independence is protected between political executive and senior bureaucratic officials. Although new processes may be more open and transparent than past processes, the paper suggests that such processes are more susceptible to partisan influence under the guise of being merit-based.

Research limitations/implications

The research was limited to one country context, Canada. As such, it will be necessary to expand this to other Westminster countries. Testing whether manifestations of new public governance in appointment processes elsewhere will be important to validate whether Canada is unique or not.

Practical implications

The authors are left to wonder if this innovation of merit-based appointments in the new administrative state is obscuring the lines of accountability and whether it forms the basis for good policy advice despite promises to the contrary.

Social implications

Trust in the government is affected by decisions behind closed doors. They appear partisan, even when they may not be. Process matters if only to highlight increased value placed on meritorious appointments.

Originality/value

Previous studies on GIC appointments have generally been to explore representation as a value. That is, studies have questioned whether diversity is maintained, for example. However, few studies have explored appointment processes using institutional approaches to examine whether reforms to such processes have respected key principles, such as merit and accountability.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 5 April 2021

Alceu Salles Camargo Jr

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the economic benefits of managing an outpatient appointments system with technological innovations.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the economic benefits of managing an outpatient appointments system with technological innovations.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a quantitative methodological procedures aiming to evaluate the cost-benefit relation and also the payback of the management and operation of an outpatient appointments system with technological innovations.

Findings

This study found a great benefit-cost relation of 30.6 showing the great economic value and social impact of managing an outpatient appointments regulation system with technological innovations.

Research limitations/implications

This study presents contribution to the literature discussion about the economic evaluation of the benefits of managing and operating more effective outpatient appointments systems because of important technological innovations.

Practical implications

This paper presents and discusses the most important and commonly used strategies and technological innovations to deal with and to manage an outpatient appointment regulation system aiming to reduce the patient no-show rates.

Social implications

The findings of this study show a great benefit-cost relation of about 30.6 which is being reverted to the society.

Originality/value

There not exist many similar studies in the pertinent literature, mostly with the Brazilian contexts.

Article
Publication date: 7 December 2020

Annie K. Lewis, Nicholas F. Taylor, Patrick W. Carney and Katherine E. Harding

Long waitlists in outpatient clinics are a widely recognised problem. The purpose of this paper is to describe and report the impact of a waitlist reduction strategy for…

Abstract

Purpose

Long waitlists in outpatient clinics are a widely recognised problem. The purpose of this paper is to describe and report the impact of a waitlist reduction strategy for an epilepsy clinic.

Design/methodology/approach

This observational study described the local impact of a methodical approach to tackling a long waiting list, using targeted strategies supported by a modest additional budget. The interventions were described using the template for intervention description and replication (TIDieR).

Findings

Over an eight-month period, the waitlist for the epilepsy clinic was reduced from 599 to 24 patients without increasing the number of days until the next available appointment. Most referrals were removed from the waitlist without an appointment. Auditing revealed a high proportion of patients no longer required the service or referrals remained on the waitlist due to administration error. A short-term increase in clinic capacity of 51 extra appointments met the needs of the remaining waiting patients. The additional project funding invested in this process was AUD $10,500 and a time-limited amount of extra work was absorbed by using existing clinic resources.

Practical implications

This waitlist reduction strategy resulted in a very small waitlist for the epilepsy clinic, which is now well placed to trial further interventions with the aim of sustaining the service with minimal waiting times. Not every referral on the waitlist, particularly the very long waiters, required an appointment. Other outpatient clinics may be able to apply this process to reduce their waitlists using a modest budget.

Originality/value

Although there are reports of successful waitlist reduction, few report the intervention in detail. Use of the TIDieR in reporting enables the intervention to be appraised or adapted to other settings where long waitlists are problematic. Considerations related to implementation of policy are discussed and in this case, a locally led and executed change management strategy was a key to achieving the result.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2021

Simone Cocciasecca, Giuseppe Grossi and Alessandro Sancino

The purpose of this paper is to review previous research on public appointments to systematize existing knowledge, identify gaps and discuss implications for future…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review previous research on public appointments to systematize existing knowledge, identify gaps and discuss implications for future research in this field.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on a systematic literature review, carried out using the Scopus database. We selected academic articles published in journals ranked in the 2018 CABS Academic Journal Guide plus public administration articles in journals classified by Google as falling within the areas of public policy and administration. The papers were analysed according to four categories: geographical area, theoretical framework, research method and organizational setting.

Findings

Results show the lack of research regarding areas like Latin America or East Asia; from a theoretical viewpoint, given the lack of explicit theoretical approaches, future research should have more formal and clear theoretical frameworks. Moreover, given the dominance of case study and review/reflection studies, alternative research methods, such as surveys or mixed methods are suggested for future works.

Research limitations/implications

We identify a new research agenda to revive the focus on public appointments as a tool for intra- and inter-organizational governance in the public sector. Specifically, we argue that how the process of public appointments is managed has huge democratic implications, and public managers have a key role to play in that respect by designing effective governance systems and organizational procedures. The selection of papers has been limited to articles published in peer- review journals ranked in the 2018 CABS Guide; no distinctions have been made regarding journals' positioning in the ranking. Moreover, this work takes a managerial and organizational approach, while the research on public appointments is clearly interdisciplinary, with previous contributions coming mainly from political scientists.

Originality/value

Despite the relevant body of literature on this topic, this study represents the first manuscript to summarize the state of the art of this theme, providing a research agenda on this very relevant but quite neglected issue in public governance.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Alan Fish

Evaluates the findings from a study designed to identify factors that motivate Australian managers to accept expatriate appointments in the East‐Asian business region…

1152

Abstract

Evaluates the findings from a study designed to identify factors that motivate Australian managers to accept expatriate appointments in the East‐Asian business region. These findings derive from 20 Australian business enterprises which have a physical presence in the East Asian business region. Results point to the need for a reassessment of existing Australian business practices in offering overseas business appointments to management staff. While extrinsic issues such as monetary satisfaction are important to the decision to seek and accept an overseas appointment, of more critical importance is how the overseas appointment, advances a person’s international career; and the opportunities the overseas appointment presents for professional development generally. A further consideration is the type and extent of information received by prospective international staff from those who have “gone before”. Overall, confirms the need for less attention to money and perquisites as inducements to accept overseas appointments. Suggests that more attention needs to be directed at the satisfaction of more intrinsic development and career advancement opportunities.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 1 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Georgios I. Zekos

Investigates the differences in protocols between arbitral tribunals and courts, with particular emphasis on US, Greek and English law. Gives examples of each country and…

4286

Abstract

Investigates the differences in protocols between arbitral tribunals and courts, with particular emphasis on US, Greek and English law. Gives examples of each country and its way of using the law in specific circumstances, and shows the variations therein. Sums up that arbitration is much the better way to gok as it avoids delays and expenses, plus the vexation/frustration of normal litigation. Concludes that the US and Greek constitutions and common law tradition in England appear to allow involved parties to choose their own judge, who can thus be an arbitrator. Discusses e‐commerce and speculates on this for the future.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 46 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

Philip A. Hamill, Pat McGregor and Symaralah Rasaratnam

While existing UK studies conduct a cross‐sectional analysis, this paper seeks to argue that the ratio of Executive Directors to non‐executive director (NED) on the boards…

Abstract

Purpose

While existing UK studies conduct a cross‐sectional analysis, this paper seeks to argue that the ratio of Executive Directors to non‐executive director (NED) on the boards of UK firms, coupled with a gradual appointment process, motivated by firms’ desire to comply with the recommendations of the Cadbury report, has the potential to produce a temporal effect.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for this study were collected from January 1990 to May 2000.

Findings

The empirical analysis suggests that a temporal pattern does exist. Two distinct periods were identified. In the initial period, prior to March 1998 the market viewed NED appointments favourably. After March 1998 NED appointments were no longer significant economic events. Overall, it appears that the market viewed the appointment of NEDs to the boards of FTSE 350 firms favourably; suggesting that such appointees were viewed as a significant input by firms as they attempted to achieve an optimal corporate governance mix.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the small body of literature on the market's perception of the value of non‐executive, outside, director appointments to FTSE‐350 firms from 1990 to 2000.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 26000