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Article
Publication date: 5 November 2019

Zhenbin Jiang, Juan Guo and Xinyu Zhang

A common pipeline of apparel design and simulation is adjusting 2D apparel patterns, putting them onto a virtual human model and performing 3D physically based simulation…

Abstract

Purpose

A common pipeline of apparel design and simulation is adjusting 2D apparel patterns, putting them onto a virtual human model and performing 3D physically based simulation. However, manually adjusting 2D apparel patterns and performing simulations require repetitive adjustments and trials in order to achieve satisfactory results. To support future made-to-fit apparel design and manufacturing, efficient tools for fast custom design purposes are desired. The purpose of this paper is to propose a method to automatically adjust 2D apparel patterns and rapidly generate acustom apparel style for a given human model.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors first pre-define a set of constraints using feature points, feature lines and ease allowance for existing apparels and human models. The authors formulate the apparel fitting to a human model, as a process of optimization using these predefined constraints. Then, the authors iteratively solve the problem by minimizing the total fitting metric.

Findings

The authors observed that through reusing existing apparel styles, the process of designing apparels can be greatly simplified. The authors used a new fitting function to measure the geometric fitting of corresponding feature points/lines between apparels and a human model. Then, the optimized 2D patterns are automatically obtained by minimizing the matching function. The authors’ experiments show that the authors’ approach can increase the reusability of existing apparel styles and improve apparel design efficiency.

Research limitations/implications

There are some limitations. First, in order to achieve interactive performance, the authors’ current 3D simulation does not detect collision within or between adjacent apparel surfaces. Second, the authors’ did not consider multiple layer apparels. It is non-trivial to define ease allowance between multiple layers.

Originality/value

The authors use a set of constraints such as ease allowance, feature points, feature lines, etc. for existing apparels and human models. The authors define a few new fitting functions using these pre-specified constraints. During physics-driven simulation, the authors iteratively minimize these fitting functions.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 May 2021

Lorna Christie, Elizabeth Kempen and Mariette Strydom

The purpose of this paper is to investigate custom-made apparel manufacturing micro-enterprise (CMME) owners’ perspectives of sustainability within their business…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate custom-made apparel manufacturing micro-enterprise (CMME) owners’ perspectives of sustainability within their business practices throughout the entire product development process and determine how educational initiatives can promote a more environmentally conscious product development process.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative case study, using face-to-face interviews and observations of CMMEs at an incubation hub presents evidence of owners’ sustainability perspectives.

Findings

Although CMME owners disregard sustainability as a pro-environmental approach within the business context, attempts at pro-environmental subconscious behaviour and a deliberate non-environmental consciousness are evident in sourcing and manufacturing during the product development process.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the case study approach of four CMMEs in an IH, the findings may not be applicable to other small and micro-businesses. Despite this limitation, valuable insights emerged that show the current inaptness of the CMMEs to manage an environmentally sustainable business practice.

Social implications

To promote sustainable development goal 12, related to the clothing and textile industry, it is postulated that CMMEs should be supported to minimise their use of resources, thereby promoting environmental sustainability.

Originality/value

The findings of this study direct the development of higher education educational programmes featuring learning content on pro-environmental design and business practices for CMMEs.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Anna Perry and Telin Chung

– The purpose of this paper is to understand Eco-Apparel consumption behavior in consumers who care about the environment.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand Eco-Apparel consumption behavior in consumers who care about the environment.

Design/methodology/approach

A snowball sampling technique was used to recruit 16 participants for in-depth interviews.

Findings

Two attitude-behavior gaps existed: the gap between environmental attitude and Eco-Apparel purchasing behavior; and the gap between Eco-Apparel attitude and Eco-Apparel purchasing behavior. There were two connections: product and emotional benefits leaded to Eco-Apparel purchasing behavior; and personal cost benefits, emotional benefits, and economic considerations leaded to Eco-Apparel using and disposing behavior. These gaps and connections suggested participants have certain standards regarding Eco-Apparel consumption. First, the standard of purchasing Eco-Apparel was the same as regular apparel. Second, participants did not want to expend much effort. Third, for some participants, emotional benefits (e.g. fun, good feeling, satisfaction) were important.

Research limitations/implications

The small sample size and the snowball sampling technique limit generalization of the study’s findings.

Practical implications

These findings might be of interest to apparel manufacturers and retailers who want to re-enforce consumers’ positive attitudes leading to actual purchase and consumption behaviors.

Originality/value

The current study for the first time examines the attitude-behavior gaps, proposes reasons behind these gaps, as well as connections between benefits and Eco-Apparel usage and disposal behaviors. In addition, the proposed framework is the first attempt to illustrate the relationships among gaps, connections, and consumption standards.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Youngjoo Na and Dong Kyu Na

Fashion and textile industry has confronted to participate with the sustainable industry and society proactively not by the government regulations, but by the shareholders…

Abstract

Purpose

Fashion and textile industry has confronted to participate with the sustainable industry and society proactively not by the government regulations, but by the shareholders or consumers driven with corporate social responsibility. The purpose of this paper is to consider methods applied for the sustainability of products according to Korean domestic fashion and textile companies and clothing types and to investigate the limitation of current sustainability methods of companies.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used document analysis and case studies of 396 companies. The study looked into newspapers, monthly magazines, and publications of fashion companies and internet web sites of almost every possible type that have been issued to date and analyzed the previous studies as well.

Findings

The companies’ strategies are of three groups, the uses of environmental friendly materials: 36.9 percent (natural fibers, recycled fibers and biodegradable fibers), apparel reuse: 4.5 percent (remodeling/alteration and transform/combination with more materials), and eco-marketing promotions: 58.6 percent. For women’s and casual wear section, the methods used with organic materials and the green-campaign messages appeared frequently, while in the men’s wear section, coolMapsi, 0or warm OnMapsi for business wear did a lot for the low indoor energy consumption, such as no neck-tie in the hot season or wearing underwear in the cold season.

Originality/value

Fashion and textile products have provided the key solutions for the generation’s happiness, identity, value, self-realization, health and role. There have been the low quality and similarity of fashion products from mass production and high speed and we should consider sustainability for the next generation and society. But the current problem in the industry is that most of eco-product developments are only short term. Also, from the high cost of eco materials and processes, there is a limited portion of sustainability section among total products and low design quality of fashion or the low profit outcomes.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Seoha Min and Helen Koo

This study aims to provide insights to designers for seeking innovative ways to design sustainable clothes and appeal to consumers by enhancing sustainability.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to provide insights to designers for seeking innovative ways to design sustainable clothes and appeal to consumers by enhancing sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

To achieve the research purpose, the researchers went through a design process and designed three prototypes. The experts’ evaluation on the prototypes was positive.

Findings

Various design strategies derived from the Korean traditional costume were explored. Based on the strategies, three prototypes were developed, and the design experts’ evaluation on the prototypes was positive.

Originality/value

The research has implications as follows. The sustainable design process and methods used in this research for developing designs inspired from cultural costumes will provide insights to designers who want to create sustainable garments inspired by a certain culture. In addition, the design and sustainable design strategies, derived from the Chosun Dynasty, will guide apparel designers to create sustainable designs and broaden their perspectives. Furthermore, the research will provide guidance to following researchers who are interested in the topic of sustainability in apparel design. The researchers explored sustainable design strategies from the Korean culture, applied them in their design process and evaluated the design outcomes. By doing so, merits and limitations of the design strategies were more clearly understood.

Details

Research Journal of Textile and Apparel, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1560-6074

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 March 2013

Ji Young Lee, Holly Halter, Kim K.P. Johnson and Haewon Ju

The purpose of this paper is first, to investigate young consumers' fashion disposition behavior, second, to identify motivations for their fashion disposition, and third…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is first, to investigate young consumers' fashion disposition behavior, second, to identify motivations for their fashion disposition, and third, to identify emotional responses experienced during and after the fashion disposition process. The paper also aims to investigate young consumers' ideas about their future fashion disposition practices and to what extent did participants link being socially responsible to their fashion disposition decisions and behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach was adopted wherein undergraduates wrote an essay concerning their apparel disposal habits. Data were analyzed using content analyses.

Findings

Participants engaged in multiple fashion disposition behaviors including donation, selling, repurposing, and swapping unwanted clothing, Participants mentioned fashionability, physical condition of an item, and social responsibility as factors that prompted their fashion disposition. Participants experienced primarily positive emotions when disposing of unwanted apparel items. In the future, participants indicated a desire to make additional efforts to donate unwanted clothing, repurpose clothing, and to attempt to reduce the amount of clothing they acquired.

Originality/value

By investigating young consumers' fashion disposal, underlying motivations for disposal were identified as well as the need for education on how to dispose of clothing items in socially responsible ways as responses suggested that these young consumers were open to disposing of their unwanted fashion items in a socially responsible manner but did not always have the skill or knowledge to do so.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2011

Jung Ha‐Brookshire and Pamela Norum

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of intensive extra‐curricular learning opportunities on students' knowledge, skills, and attitudes regarding cotton and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of intensive extra‐curricular learning opportunities on students' knowledge, skills, and attitudes regarding cotton and sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

A three‐phase extra‐curricular learning opportunity was designed to include a Sustainable Cotton Summit; pre‐summit and post‐summit surveys of students' knowledge, skills, and attitudes toward cotton; and an individual essay competition.

Findings

The two‐group mean comparisons showed that the summit made the largest impact on students' knowledge in cotton and sustainability, followed by students' skills and attitudes. The student essays indicated that the summit provided insight that is not readily available in their education curricula.

Research limitations/implications

The benefits derived from educating students about sustainability and cotton should be extended to other fibers, as well as to other segments of the supply chain.

Practical implications

Businesses involved with cotton supply chain must do a better job at educating and explaining sustainability aspects of cotton to consumers. Educators must also further their efforts in preparing students as professionals in the industry.

Originality/value

In response to the lack of educational opportunities about cotton and sustainability in the textile‐ and apparel‐related academic field in the USA, this study offered the two‐day Sustainable Cotton Summit in 2010 in which over 400 students have participated. Changes in students' knowledge, skills, and attitudes were assessed through pre‐ and post‐summit surveys, and post‐summit essays.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 June 2021

Timmy H. Tseng, Crystal T. Lee, Hsiao-Ting Huang and Wei Hao Yang

Due to fierce competition in the mobile retailing market, it is desirable to identify the success factors driving consumers to reuse a mobile shopping application. This…

Abstract

Purpose

Due to fierce competition in the mobile retailing market, it is desirable to identify the success factors driving consumers to reuse a mobile shopping application. This research intends to develop a model for mobile shopping app success by integrating an e-commerce systems success (ESS) model and sales promotion benefits and parasocial interaction literatures.

Design/methodology/approach

302 useable online questionnaires were obtained. The data analysis was conducted using the structural equation modelling.

Findings

The results indicate the validity of the ESS model in predicting consumers' reuse intention of mobile shopping apps where three quality dimensions of system, information and service facilitate both perceived value and user satisfaction, which in turn generates reuse intention. Furthermore, savings and entertainment denoting the utilitarian and hedonic sales promotion benefits have positive impact on perceived value but have no influence on satisfaction. Parasocial intention between consumers and sellers facilitates both value perception and satisfaction.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the mobile retailing literature by identifying the success factors driving consumers' continuance intention of mobile shopping apps. Theoretically, it validates and extends the ESS model in mobile shopping app context by identifying savings, entertainment and parasocial interaction as additional success factors. Based on the findings, two approaches are proposed to suggest mobile retailers design a successful mobile shopping app.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 August 2019

Manoj Kumar Paras, Antonela Curteza and Geetika Varshneya

Undesired changes in the environment and reduction of natural resources have necessitated the need for environmental protection and resource conservation. Textile and…

Abstract

Purpose

Undesired changes in the environment and reduction of natural resources have necessitated the need for environmental protection and resource conservation. Textile and clothing industry is the second largest (after food) industry. Therefore, there is a need to protect the environment by reducing the use of natural resources. The purpose of this paper is to explore and identify the best reverse value chain alternatives for the clothing industry.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory study is undertaken at six organizations working in the area of used clothes. The data were collected with the help of semi-structured interviews and a questionnaire, for the analytical hierarchy process analysis. The information from other sources such documents, websites, and reports was also gathered to strengthen the findings.

Findings

There are different reverse value chain methods to minimize the use of natural resources such as direct reuse, upcycling and downcycling. Incineration and landfill can be considered as the last options. The selection of best reverse value chain method is a multi-criteria value decision-making problem, as this involves complex decision parameters.

Practical implications

The industry practitioners can use the above model and results to make end-of-life decisions.

Originality/value

This paper develops a model on the basis of the analytic hierarchy process to determine the best method to close the loop of the clothing value chain. On the basis of the result and analysis, upcycling emerged to be the best alternative to close the loop of the clothing industry.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2020

Amira Mukendi, Iain Davies, Sarah Glozer and Pierre McDonagh

The sustainable fashion (SF) literature is fragmented across the management discipline, leaving the path to a SF future unclear. As of yet, there has not been an attempt…

Abstract

Purpose

The sustainable fashion (SF) literature is fragmented across the management discipline, leaving the path to a SF future unclear. As of yet, there has not been an attempt to bring these insights together or to more generally explore the question of “what is known about SF in the management literature and where could the SF field go from there?”. The purpose of this paper is to bring together the field to identify opportunities for societal impact and further research.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review was conducted from the first appearances of SF in the management literature in 2000 up to papers published in June 2019, which resulted in 465 included papers.

Findings

The results illustrate that SF research is largely defined by two approaches, namely, pragmatic change and radical change. The findings reveal seven research streams that span across the discipline to explore how organisational and consumer habits can be shaped for the future.

Research limitations/implications

What is known about SF is constantly evolving, therefore, the paper aims to provide a representative sample of the state of SF in management literature to date.

Practical implications

This review provides decision makers with insights that have been synthesised from across the management field.

Originality/value

This review identifies knowledge gaps and informs managerial decision making in the field, particularly through serving as a foundation for further research.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 54 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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