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Article

Jie Gu, Xiaolun Wang and Tian Lu

The purpose of this paper is to explain the “good-to-good” app switching phenomenon that has not been specifically addressed in the prior switching literature. Drawing on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain the “good-to-good” app switching phenomenon that has not been specifically addressed in the prior switching literature. Drawing on the consumer learning theory, this study explores how external social word of mouth (WOM) and internal satisfaction influence app users’ switching intention through social learning route and analogical learning route. This study also examines the moderating effect of app heterogeneity.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was used to collect data. Two categories of mobile apps with different levels of within-category heterogeneity were targeted in survey questions. A total of 525 valid survey responses were collected.

Findings

Social WOM about a competing app increases users’ switching intention through both social norm influence and social information influence, resulting in a direct effect on switching intention and an indirect effect through the perceived attractiveness of a competing app. Users’ satisfaction with an adopted app positively influences the perceived attractiveness of an unadopted competing app, offering evidence for analogical learning in user switching. Meanwhile, users’ satisfaction imposes a direct negative effect on switching intention. A higher level of within-category heterogeneity strengthens (weakens) the positive effect of social WOM (satisfaction) on users’ perceived attractiveness of a competing app.

Originality/value

This study complements the existing switching literature by disentangling the “good-to-good” switching phenomenon in the mobile app market from the consumer learning perspective. This study extends the understanding of cross-category user switching by considering different levels of product heterogeneity.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article

Yi Ding and Kah Hin Chai

A pressing issue with mobile applications (apps) is continued use. The expectancy disconfirmation theory is employed as the theoretical basis for most studies on…

Abstract

Purpose

A pressing issue with mobile applications (apps) is continued use. The expectancy disconfirmation theory is employed as the theoretical basis for most studies on continuance. Recognising the experiential aspects of using mobile apps, the purpose of this paper is to extend the existing disconfirmation model to account for the emotional experiences and their influences on continuance. In particular, the authors are interested in the factors that drive the experience of emotions, and how these cognitive drivers differ in shaping distinct emotional experiences (i.e. positive vs negative).

Design/methodology/approach

Structural equation modelling was applied on 271 valid responses collected from an online survey conducted among mobile app users.

Findings

Disconfirmation affects emotions in a non-linear fashion through arousal, and both positive and negative emotions influence continuance intention. Furthermore, positive emotions tend to be influenced by inherent benefits, whereas negative emotions are more likely to be influenced by instrumental benefits.

Research limitations/implications

The generalisability of this study may be enhanced by collecting data from more diverse samples and validating the model on more mobile app categories.

Originality/value

This study progresses from the demonstration of a mere impact of emotions on continuance as in several recent empirical inquiries to more nuanced understandings of the role of emotions in forming continuance intention.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 115 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Book part

Unnati Narang and Venkatesh Shankar

Mobile marketing, the two- or multi-way communication and promotion of an offer between a firm and its customers using a mobile medium, device, platform, or technology…

Abstract

Mobile marketing, the two- or multi-way communication and promotion of an offer between a firm and its customers using a mobile medium, device, platform, or technology, has made rapid strides in the past several years. Mobile marketing has entered its second phase or Mobile Marketing 2.0. The surpassing of desktop by mobile devices in digital media consumption, diffusion of wearable devices among customers, and an overall integration and interconnectedness of devices characterize this phase. Against this backdrop, we present a synthesis of the most recent literature in mobile marketing. We discuss three key advances in mobile marketing research relating to mobile targeting, personalization, and mobile-led cross-channel effects. We outline emerging industry trends in mobile marketing, including mobile app monetization, augmented reality, data and privacy, wearable devices, driverless vehicles, the Internet of Things, and artificial intelligence. Within each extant and emerging area, we delineate the future research opportunities in mobile marketing. Finally, we discuss the impact of mobile marketing on customer, firm, and societal outcomes.

Details

Marketing in a Digital World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-339-1

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Article

Abu Amar Fauzi and Margaret L. Sheng

This research aims to examine the relationship of personal innovativeness, perceived value (consisting of perceived utilitarian and hedonic value) and continuance…

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to examine the relationship of personal innovativeness, perceived value (consisting of perceived utilitarian and hedonic value) and continuance intention in the context of ride-hailing apps and to investigate consumer behaviour differences between metro and non-metro consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey sample included 402 consumers of popular ride-hailing apps in Indonesia to test the research framework. Then, PLS-SEM-based software was utilised to examine the hypothesised relationship.

Findings

The findings indicate that the effect of personal innovativeness on continuance intention in using ride-hailing apps will operate through the full mediation role of perceived hedonic and utilitarian value, respectively. The findings also show that there are consumer behaviour differences between metro and non-metro consumers, in which the cognitive belief of consumers in the metro areas regarding the usage of ride-hailing apps is more related to hedonic value.

Research limitations/implications

The variety of respondent demographic profiles in this research is limited in that most of the research respondents are students. In such a case, the study may face the issue of generalisation.

Originality/value

This research generates an extended idea of the information technology continuance model by validating the important role of perceived hedonic and utilitarian value as an integral part of the model and strengthens the insights that Indonesia has consumer behaviour differences regarding technology-based services, particularly ride-hailing apps, between metro and non-metro consumers.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article

Bart Larivière, Herm Joosten, Edward C. Malthouse, Marcel van Birgelen, Pelin Aksoy, Werner H. Kunz and Ming‐Hui Huang

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the concept of Value Fusion to describe how value can emerge from the use of mobile, networked technology by consumers, firms…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the concept of Value Fusion to describe how value can emerge from the use of mobile, networked technology by consumers, firms, and entities such as non‐consumers, a firm's competitors, and others simultaneously.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper discusses the combination of characteristics of mobile devices that enable Value Fusion and discusses specific value and benefits to consumers and firms of being mobile and networked. Value Fusion is introduced and defined and set apart from related, other conceptualizations of value. Examples are provided of Value Fusion and the necessary conditions for Value Fusion to occur are discussed. Also discussed are the conditions under which the use of mobile, networked technology by consumers and firms may lead to Value Confusion instead of Value Fusion. Several research questions are proposed to further enhance the understanding and management of Value Fusion.

Findings

The combination of portable, personal, networked, textual/visual and converged characteristics of mobile devices enables firms and consumers to interact and communicate, produce and consume benefits, and create value in new ways that have not been captured by popular conceptualizations of value. These traditional conceptualizations include customer value, experiential value, customer lifetime value, and customer engagement value. Value Fusion is defined as value that can be achieved for the entire network of consumers and firms simultaneously, just by being on the mobile network. Value Fusion results from producers and consumers: individually or collectively; actively and passively; concurrently; interactively or in aggregation contributing to a mobile network; in real time; and just‐in‐time.

Originality/value

This paper synthesizes insights from the extant value literature that by and large has focused on either the customer's or the firm's perspective, but rarely blended the two.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Abstract

Details

The Economics of Time Use
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-838-4

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Article

Caroline Bastos Capaverde, Igor Baptista de Oliveira Medeiros, Cláudia Simone Antonello and Maria Beatriz Rodrigues

This study aims to analyze the processes of introducing apps (Easy Taxi and Uber) in the work routine of taxi and private drivers, exploring their work relations and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to analyze the processes of introducing apps (Easy Taxi and Uber) in the work routine of taxi and private drivers, exploring their work relations and identifying new forms of relationship between them and their passengers. The authors expose the complexity in which such processes occur in a dialogical way, aligning poststructuralist notions of actor–network theory with theorizations on subjectivity production.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted semi-structured interviews with 16 drivers of Easy Taxi and Uber apps in three Brazilian capitals.

Findings

Apps came to play a central role in the work practice of the drivers interviewed. The authors suggest that they offer more security, convenience, accessibility and agility, going beyond dependent forms of working and living, in overlapping networks and connections, enacting entities that guide workers and users to an increasingly programmed way of life.

Practical implications

New forms of thinking managerial relations with taxi and private drivers work and their work relations with other drivers and passengers.

Social implications

This kind of technology not only generates new social relations but also activates mechanisms of subjectivation that reverberate new forms of relating, working and living in contemporaneity.

Originality/value

Approaches on subjectivity regarding the adoption of technology in the practice of work in the contemporaneity, with the emergence of new working relations mediated by e-hailing technology.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article

Oskaras Vorobjovas-Pinta and Isaac Jonathan Dalla-Fontana

The purpose of this paper is to report novel information about the use of gay apps by the patrons of an exclusively gay resort in Queensland, Australia. This novel…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report novel information about the use of gay apps by the patrons of an exclusively gay resort in Queensland, Australia. This novel research environment facilitates an understanding of the embeddedness of gay dating apps within contemporary gay culture and community and the spatial reorientation that comes alongside the juxtaposition of physical and digital geographies.

Design/methodology/approach

An ethnographic study was conducted at the resort, and qualitative data presented here are drawn from semi-structured interviews with 27 gay-identifying male patrons of the resort. Critical ethnography provided beneficial access to situated perspectives and realities.

Findings

These data indicate that gay apps remain a pervasive way of making connections, even in an environment where common homosexuality is a reasonable expectation and where open self-expression is permitted and even encouraged. This complicates assumptions that gay apps’ emergence was in response to a need for privacy or anonymity for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people in wider, straight society.

Originality/value

This paper reports the results of an ethnographic survey conducted in a highly novel research environment and particularly seeks to address divergent experiences of social and cultural change by LGBT people, including generational divides. It has value in demonstrating clear differences, ambiguities and mixed implications of gay apps and their relationship with changing LGBT spaces.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 74 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

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Article

Jungmin Son

The purpose of this paper is to examine the dynamic effects of users’ initial experience and user attachment on downloading information-seeking (e.g. news, map, education…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the dynamic effects of users’ initial experience and user attachment on downloading information-seeking (e.g. news, map, education) and -sharing (e.g. messenger, chatting, social networks) applications.

Design/methodology/approach

From one of the largest application stores in South Korea, 225 applications were examined through analysis of 1.5 years of download records. Logistic regression and Bayesian models including time-varying coefficients were used.

Findings

Over time, the download patterns of users of the app market become dynamic. In the initial stage, users have a tendency to download apps of similar types. For example, users who initially download information-seeking applications continue to download these types of applications more frequently than information-sharing applications. In the later stage, however, users tend to download applications that accord with their attachment intensity. Users who want to share information with others are more likely to download information-sharing applications as compared to information-seeking ones. Finally, this tendency persists with the accumulation of more experience.

Research limitations/implications

This study applies existing models and theories from previous research to the app market, such as state dependence, intrinsic motivation, and time-varying coefficient models. However, this study focuses on information-seeking and -sharing applications. Therefore, further study is needed in order to extend the findings to other types of applications, including games, paid applications, and so on.

Practical implications

This study provides valuable information for marketing managers running application stores and app developers who want to maximize performance. In the initial stages when users download apps, app market managers must recommend apps with consideration of both the users’ attachment and their initial experience, but after app users have accumulated some experience, only user attachment should be considered as a criterion for recommendations.

Originality/value

This is a unique study in which users’ download behavior regarding information-seeking and -sharing applications is analyzed using long-term actual data.

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Article

Nadine Strauß, Laura Alonso-Muñoz and Homero Gil de Zúñiga

The purpose of this study is to identify the structural processes that lead citizens to escape their common social circles when talking about politics and public affairs…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identify the structural processes that lead citizens to escape their common social circles when talking about politics and public affairs (e.g. “filter bubbles”). To do so, this study tests to what extent political attitudes, political behavior, news media consumption and discussion frequency affect discussion network heterogeneity among US citizens.

Design/methodology/approach

Supported by the polling group Nielsen, this study uses a two-wave panel online survey to study the antecedents and mechanisms of discussion network heterogeneity among US citizens. To test the hypotheses and answer the research questions, ordinary least squares (OLS) regressions (cross-sectional, lagged and autoregressive) and mediation analyses were conducted.

Findings

The findings imply that political discussion frequency functions as the key element in explaining the mechanism that leads politically interested and participatory citizens (online) as well as news consumers of traditional and online media to seek a more heterogeneous discussion network, disrupting the so-called “filter bubbles.” However, mediation analyses also showed that discussion frequency can lead to more homogenous discussion networks if people score high on political knowledge, possibly reflecting the formation of a close network of political-savvy individuals.

Originality/value

The survey data give important insights into the 2016 pre-election situation, trying to explain why US citizens were more likely to remain in homogenous discussion networks when talking about politics and public affairs. By using two-wave panel data, the analyses allow to draw tentative conclusions about the influential and inhibiting factors and mechanisms that lead individuals to seek/avoid a more heterogeneous discussion network.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 44 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

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