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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Anurag Sharma, Arun Khosla, Mamta Khosla and Yogeshwara Rao M.

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the face processing responses of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) using skin conductance response (SCR) patterns…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the face processing responses of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) using skin conductance response (SCR) patterns and to compare it with typically developed (TD) children.

Design/methodology/approach

Two experiments have been designed to analyze the effect of face processing. In the first experiment, learned non-face (objects) vs unknown face stimuli have been shown and in the second experiment, familiar vs unfamiliar face stimuli have been shown to ten ASD and ten TD children and SCR patterns have been recorded, analyzed and compared for both the groups.

Findings

It has been observed that children with ASD were able to differentiate faces out of learned non-face stimuli and their SCR patterns were similar as TD children in the first experiment. In the second experiment, children with ASD were unable to recognize familiar faces from unfamiliar faces but TD children could easily discriminate between familiar and unfamiliar faces as their SCR patterns were different from children with ASD.

Research limitations/implications

The present study advocates that impairment in face identification exists in children with ASD. Hence, it can be concluded that in children with ASD face processing is present but they do not recognize familiar faces or it can be said that face familiarization effect is absent in children with ASD.

Originality/value

There are very few findings that used SCR signal as main analysis parameter for face processing in children with ASD, in most of the studies; Electroencephalography signal has been used as analysis parameter. Moreover, familiar and unfamiliar face processing with multiple stimuli used in present work adds novelty to the literature.

Details

Advances in Autism, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3868

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2021

Shilpa Sharma, Punam Rattan, Anurag Sharma and Mohammad Shabaz

This paper aims to introduce recently an unregulated unsupervised algorithm focused on voice activity detection by data clustering maximum margin, i.e. support vector…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to introduce recently an unregulated unsupervised algorithm focused on voice activity detection by data clustering maximum margin, i.e. support vector machine. The algorithm for clustering K-mean used to solve speech behaviour detection issues was later applied, the application, therefore, did not permit the identification of voice detection. This is critical in demands for speech recognition.

Design/methodology/approach

Here, the authors find a voice activity detection detector based on a report provided by a K-mean algorithm that permits sliding window detection of voice and noise. However, first, it needs an initial detection pause. The machine initialized by the algorithm will work on health-care infrastructure and provides a platform for health-care professionals to detect the clear voice of patients.

Findings

Timely usage discussion on many histories of NOISEX-92 var reveals the average non-speech and the average signal-to-noise ratios hit concentrations which are higher than modern voice activity detection.

Originality/value

Research work is original.

Details

World Journal of Engineering, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1708-5284

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

To study the risks, and benefits, to companies or introducing new products to the market.

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Abstract

Purpose

To study the risks, and benefits, to companies or introducing new products to the market.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the findings in context.

Findings

Ahn‐Sook Hwang describes Korean cosmetic company AmorePacific's integrated approach to innovative technology, marketing and management to win market share against domestic and global competition. Patrick Barwise and Seán Meehan say, as products and services become more and more alike, customers aren't looking for “something different”, but something which works well. Anurag Sharma and Nelson Lacey study the new product development process of the US pharmaceutical industry to determine whether or not a steady stream of new product innovations has a beneficial effect on firm performance.

Originality/value

Prompts organizations to ask themselves why they are introducing new products. Introduces the argument that striving to “be better” may be an alternative to a constant search for new products.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1991

Anurag Sharma, Debra L. Shapiro and Idalene F. Kesner

In this paper, findings from the negotiation literature are tested in the context of mergers. Firms' relative threat capacity, surveillance by constituents, accountability…

Abstract

In this paper, findings from the negotiation literature are tested in the context of mergers. Firms' relative threat capacity, surveillance by constituents, accountability to constituents, and the attractiveness of initial offers are shown to predict management's resistance to mergers in a manner consistent with theories in the negotiation literature. The pattern of predicted two‐way and three‐way interactions support speculations and findings previously reported in the negotiation literature as well. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Anurag Shrivastava and Sudhir Kumar Sharma

Increase in the speed of processors has led to crucial role of communication in the performance of systems. As a result, routing is taken into consideration as one of the…

Abstract

Purpose

Increase in the speed of processors has led to crucial role of communication in the performance of systems. As a result, routing is taken into consideration as one of the most important subjects of the network-on-chip (NOC) architecture. Routing algorithms to deadlock avoidance prevent packets route completely based on network traffic condition by means of restricting the route of packets. This action leads to less performance especially in non-uniform traffic patterns. On the other hand, true fully adaptive routing algorithm provides routing of packets completely based on traffic conditions. However, deadlock detection and recovery mechanisms are needed to handle deadlocks. Use of a global bus beside NOC as a parallel supportive environment provides a platform to offer advantages of both features of bus and NOC.

Design/methodology/approach

In this research, the authors use this bus as an escaping path for deadlock recovery technique.

Findings

According to simulation results, this bus is a suitable platform for a deadlock recovery technique.

Originality/value

This bus is useful for broadcast and multicast operations, sending delay sensitive signals, system management and other services.

Details

World Journal of Engineering, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1708-5284

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 January 2021

Ashish Saini, Anurag Pandey, Sanjita Sharma, Umesh Shaligram Suradkar, Yellamelli Ramji Ambedkar, Priyanka Meena and Asman Singh Gurjar

The purpose of this study is to develop chicken powder (CP) incorporated fried chicken vermicelli and to evaluate the collective effect of rosemary and betel leaf extracts…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to develop chicken powder (CP) incorporated fried chicken vermicelli and to evaluate the collective effect of rosemary and betel leaf extracts (RE+BE) in developed products, on the performance of storage study parameters.

Design/methodology/approach

Two different groups were made from developed products: the first control group without RE+BE incorporated and the second group treated with RE+BE (1:1). Various chemical, microbiological and sensory parameters of both groups were evaluated at intervals of 15 days up to 60 days of storage.

Findings

RE+BE incorporation had significantly improved (p < 0.01) the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARs), free fatty acid (FFA) and tyrosine value as compared to control. TBARs value of RE+BE treated product remained lower (0.23 ± 0.08 to 0.65 ± 0.07) than the control (0.25 ± 0.06 to 0.83 ± 0.05). Similarly, RE+BE treated product had significantly (p < 0.04) lower total plate count (TPC), Staphylococcus count (SC) and significantly (p < 0.01) lower yeast and mold count than control. Likewise RE+BE incorporation significantly (p < 0.01) improves sensory score (texture, flavor and overall acceptability except for appearance) of the product. RE+BE treated sample at the 60th day had a higher overall acceptability score (6.3 ± 0.8) than the score of control at the 45th day (6.1 ± 0.9).

Research limitations/implications

A shelf-stable meat product can be made by chicken powder incorporation in the gram flour and a combination of rosemary and betel leaf extracts may be used to improve the shelf-life of meat products.

Practical implications

A shelf-stable meat product can be made by chicken powder incorporation in the gram flour and a combination of rosemary and betel leaf extracts may be used to improve the shelf-life of meat products.

Originality/value

RE+BE incorporation into chicken vermicelli improved chemical (TBARs, FFA content and Tyrosine value), microbiological (TPC, Staphylococcus count and yeast and mold count) and sensory (flavor, texture and overall acceptability) parameters of chicken vermicelli during 60-day storage.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 51 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2021

Rekha Chawla, S. Sivakumar, Santosh Kumar Mishra, Harsimran Kaur and Rahul Kumar Anurag

Milk cake is a well-renowned khoa-based dairy product in India, produced either from the buffalo milk or using a specific danedar variety of khoa. Under ambient…

Abstract

Purpose

Milk cake is a well-renowned khoa-based dairy product in India, produced either from the buffalo milk or using a specific danedar variety of khoa. Under ambient conditions, shelf-life of milk cake is generally up to 3–4 days, whereas under refrigeration conditions, it can last up to 12–14 days. Therefore, the present study aims to evaluate the effect of modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) to enhance the shelf-life and keeping intact freshness of milk cake under refrigerated conditions (4 ± 2 °C).

Design/methodology/approach

Different gas concentrations of N2 and CO2 (70:30, 50:50 and 90:10) were used as a treatment, whereas control samples were kept under atmospheric air composition. The product was examined for sensory, physicochemical and microbiological parameters at weekly intervals.

Findings

The physicochemical and microbiological attributes displayed gradual elevation with progressive storage period in all the samples. However, the overall sensory profile of the product remained acceptable for a longer duration. Most of the quality parameters in control declined more rapidly with a shelf life of 14 days, in comparison to MAP packed samples, where gas flushing with the ratio 70:30 was found to be best suited for extending the shelf life of milk cake up to 28 days at refrigeration temperature.

Originality/value

To extend the shelf life of milk cake, modified atmosphere was provided with different gas ratios to reach a best-suited environment for sensory, storage life and proximate parameters.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Yogesh Kumar, Vinay Kumar Tanwar, Anurag Pandey, Prateek Shukla and Vikas Sharma

The purpose of this paper is to develop chicken cutlets enrobed with bread crumbs vis-à-vis dried carrot pomace and to assess its effect on physico-chemical properties…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop chicken cutlets enrobed with bread crumbs vis-à-vis dried carrot pomace and to assess its effect on physico-chemical properties, sensory attributes and texture profile analysis.

Design/methodology/approach

Three experimental groups were made: control group chicken cutlets (C), chicken cutlets enrobed with bread crumbs group (Tb) and chicken cutlets enrobed with dried carrot pomace group (Tc). All the procedures used in the study for estimation of various physico-chemical properties, sensory evaluation and texture profile analysis were standard protocols.

Findings

There was a significant (p < 0.05) increase in water holding capacity, crude fibre content and ash content of enrobed chicken cutlets, whereas moisture, fat content and shrinkage of product were significantly (p < 0.05) decreased. The results for sensory evaluation and texture profile analysis of enrobed chicken cutlets were better than control group. Overall acceptability score of chicken cutlets enrobed with dried carrot pomace was revealed to be highest (7.5 ± 0.29) and that of control group was found to be lowest (6.4 ± 0.22). Hardness (N/cm2) value found for control group chicken cutlets, chicken cutlets enrobed with bread crumbs group and chicken cutlets enrobed with dried carrot pomace group were 2.2 ± 0.17, 3.1 ± 0.29 and 4.3 ± 0.27, respectively.

Research limitations/implications

Future research may benefit to assess the effect of enrobing with bread crumbs and dried carrot pomace on mineral and vitamin content and lipid profile of meat products.

Originality/value

Enrobing of chicken cutlets with bread crumbs and dried carrot pomace improved the sensory attributes along with texture profile analysis. Hence, enrobing with bread crumbs and dried carrot pomace could be used as processing technology to improve sensory appeal, especially crispiness of meat products.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 47 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 19 November 2013

Sangeeta Goel and Gita Bajaj

Human resource management, business ethics, public policy.

Abstract

Subject area

Human resource management, business ethics, public policy.

Study level/applicability

The case can also be taught in MBA/postgraduate in management programmes in general management or HR classes to give a lesson in organizational conflict and resolution, negotiation skills (strategies, tactics and power in negotiation) towards the middle or end of the course. The course can also be taught in MBA/postgraduate in management programmes in business ethics classes to make students appreciate the various approaches to ethics – end-results, duty, social contract and personalistic ethics. It also helps students learn how to institute ethics into the cultural fabric of the organization. In public policy programmes, it could be taught to illustrate the crucial role and at times unintended outcomes of actions of street level bureaucracies in policy implementation. The course can also be taught in refresher training programmes for executives to give lessons in conflict management, mediation strategies, union negotiations and ethics.

Case overview

This teaching case is based on a real incident that took place in a defence production factory of India in the year 2009. It succinctly unfolds a small showdown between two officers that acquires a disproportionate size and explosive dimension and vitiates the environment of the entire organization. The case is a narration of a small row that in no time became a full-blown organizational dispute with layers of issues. Two officers, one very senior and the other influential, got entangled in a conflict, unfortunately in the presence of a large audience; dissatisfied workers and officers fanned the sentiments and encouraged them to unethically leverage legal privileges by gaming in the name of caste and sexual harassment to gain power in the messy dispute. The protagonist Ram Sharma, the General Manager (head) of the factory, is in a precarious situation as the conflict not only puts his managerial skills but also his moral standards and ethics to test.

Expected learning outcomes

After discussion and analysis of this case, the students should be able to: appreciate and evaluate the complexities and multiple facets of an organizational conflict including ethical challenges faced in a real life situation, recommend the options and course of action a manager could resort to in a high stake and time bound situation, learn to develop a basic framework for analysing, negotiations and strategize to resolve a conflict as a manager-mediator in such a situation, learn to handle difficult negotiation bound by complexities of unethical and legal disputes, answer to themselves the criticality of ground level bureaucracy's role in implementation of public policies (optional if the faculty decides to discuss the part provided in the teaching note). For international students, this is a case to learn dynamics of “negotiations in Indian context”. Overall development of critical thinking and analytical skills.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 3 no. 8
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2018

Anurag Tiruwa, Rajan Yadav and Pradeep Kumar Suri

Social networking sites (SNSs), especially Facebook, have made deep inroads in the teaching-learning process worldwide. The purpose of this paper is to understand the key…

Abstract

Purpose

Social networking sites (SNSs), especially Facebook, have made deep inroads in the teaching-learning process worldwide. The purpose of this paper is to understand the key factors which influence a students’ intention to use Facebook for academic usage.

Design/methodology/approach

A web-based questionnaire survey was administered among 218 students enrolled in higher education programme of universities/institutions in National Capital Territory of Delhi. The relationship among the proposed variable were tested through structural equation modelling and neural network (NN) approach. SEM is used to identify and validate the factors significant to influence the intention to use Facebook among students. To further find which of the factors are more influential, factors NN with tenfold cross-validation was used to identify the factors which are more influential among the ones proposed in this study.

Findings

The results suggested that the proposed framework has a good fit and the five relationships hypothesized were found to be significant; thus, establishing that the antecedent factors have a positive influence on the intention of users (student) to actively use Facebook as an academic medium for collaborative learning.

Originality/value

This study establishes that the antecedent factors identified in the course of this study have a positive influence on the intention to use Facebook for higher academics and collaborative learning by the students. This paper suggests and supports the adoption and usage of Facebook as a learning tool for higher academics.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

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