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Article

Antonio Leal-Millán, Jose Luis Roldán, Antonio L. Leal-Rodríguez and Jaime Ortega-Gutiérrez

Despite the positive effects of customer capital (CC), questions remain over how managers enable CC growth by applying their skills and capabilities through managerial…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the positive effects of customer capital (CC), questions remain over how managers enable CC growth by applying their skills and capabilities through managerial actions and strategies, such as developing information technology (IT) capability, fostering relationship learning (RL) activities and developing green innovation performance (GIP) with clients. These questions are especially pertinent in small and medium-sized enterprises and automotive industry companies that operate through supply chains, where knowledge about customers is likely to result from personal contact between customers and organisational members. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the extent to which these managerial actions were more likely to lead to the successful creation of CC.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the partial least squares technique, this paper studies how these three managerial actions impact on CC. To do so, data from 140 companies in the Spanish automotive components manufacturing sector have been used.

Findings

The findings support the influence of RL on both GIP and CC. RL is a key managerial action in exploiting customer information and knowledge advantages, enabling firms to structure and reconfigure resources to produce new ways to compete and to satisfy stakeholders. In addition, results show that GIP is a determinant of CC because of its contribution to achieving sustainable competitive advantage, with GIP performing a mediating role in the relationship between RL and CC. A second contribution shows that IT is not in itself able to yield a competitive advantage, thereby validating the existence of complementary or co-focused strategic assets such as RL and GIP, which enhance IT’s influence on CC.

Research limitations/implications

The authors were unable to explore the subtleties of the processes over time. Future research should include a longitudinal study.

Practical implications

This study considers RL an essential factor in achieving both GIP and CC. Consequently, managers should seek to build strong RL cultures. In addition, this study shows that IT is not in itself able to yield a competitive advantage, thereby validating the existence of complementary or co-focused strategic assets such as RL and GIP.

Originality/value

No study has ever examined these three antecedent variables (IT, RL and GIP) together, with the aim to examine their effects on CC.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Article

Francisco J. Carmona-Márquez, Antonio G. Leal-Millán, Adolfo E. Vázquez-Sánchez, Antonio L. Leal-Rodríguez and Stephen Eldridge

Prior studies by Salaheldin (2009) and Talib et al. (2011) have assessed the relationships between TQM critical success factors (CSF) and business results. The purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

Prior studies by Salaheldin (2009) and Talib et al. (2011) have assessed the relationships between TQM critical success factors (CSF) and business results. The purpose of this paper is to build upon this research by considering the relationships between these CSFs and their sequencing during the implementation of TQM. Furthermore, the influence exerted by the maturity of TQM implementation on the link between instrumental drivers and performance is explored.

Design/methodology/approach

The TQM drivers are clustered by means of three constructs: strategic enablers, tactical drivers and instrumental drivers and a model employed in which the strategic and tactical factors are treated as antecedents of the instrumental drivers. The direct effect of each cluster on business results and the indirect relationship of strategic and tactical factors via the mediating role of the instrumental drivers are assessed. These assessments use the partial least squares (PLS) approach which is a variance-based structural equation modeling technique using a sample of 113 Spanish organizations with experience of implementing a TQM program.

Findings

The findings confirm the existing relationships among the CSFs and business performance identified by studies Salaheldin (2009) and Talib et al. (2011). However, the results reveal that instrumental drivers possess the highest variance explanation power over business performance outcomes and it is possible to identify a CSF implementation sequence that generates the greatest impact on business performance. Furthermore, the study was inconclusive with regard to the influence exerted by the number of years of TQM implementation on the link between the instrumental drivers and performance.

Research limitations/implications

The first is related to organizational bias. It seems likely that those firms which are not satisfied with their TQM system performance would be less likely to be motivated to contribute to the development of this study. Therefore, the authors have included in the sample a higher proportion of “good” systems than is the case in the population at large. Second, although the authors provide evidence of causality, causality itself has not been proven. Third, this research relies mainly on perceptions and the authors only used a single method to elicit these perceptions. Finally, this research was carried out in a specific geographical setting (Spanish companies) and the authors must be cautious about generalizing these results in other contexts.

Practical implications

This study offers a substantial number of practical implications. First firms’ managers should emphasize that continuous improvement, benchmarking and zero-defects mentality is a never-ending process. Especially, they should understand that reliable product/service design is critical to exceed the customers’ expectations, leading to improved business success. The results of this study should also lead managers to seeing a “return on investment” in their efforts to implement a TQM program by first, paying more attention on how to implement the instrumental factors, and second, avoiding the belief that the passage of time and experience-based learning will bring business performance enhancement and success on their own.

Social implications

Although, the literature agrees that strategic factors are valuable assets and have a crucial role in the deployment of TQM systems, the study empirically validates this assertion. However, at the same time it shows that this impact on performance is stronger and much more significant by reconfiguring instrumental factors. This implies that strategic and tactical factors do have an effect on business success, but they do so indirectly, by reconfiguring and reinforcing instrumental factors that better fit the stakeholders’ needs and expectations.

Originality/value

The results suggest the need to consider whether all the CSFs are equally relevant on the basis of their contribution to business success. For example, strategic enablers are generally considered to be of primary importance with tactical and instrumental drivers assuming a secondary position. The study challenges this view and highlights the role of instrumental drivers over strategic and tactical factors with the clear implication that managers should focus strongly on daily implementation tasks such as benchmarking, zero-defects mentality and continuous improvement processes in order to achieve good business performance outcomes.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

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Article

Ricardo Hernández‐Mogollon, Gabriel Cepeda‐Carrión, Juan G. Cegarra‐Navarro and Antonio Leal‐Millán

There is no empirical evidence, particularly in relation to small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs), to support the concept of cultural barriers and how they relate to…

Abstract

Purpose

There is no empirical evidence, particularly in relation to small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs), to support the concept of cultural barriers and how they relate to open‐mindedness (OM). Some of these cultural barriers can be linked to outdated knowledge, which can impede the adoption of new configurations. The purpose of this paper therefore is to test the role of cultural barriers in the relationship between OM and organizational innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

These relationships are examined through an empirical investigation of 133 SMEs.

Findings

The results show that the relationship between OM and organizational innovation is likely to suffer if a firm does not overcome previously its cultural barriers. An explanation for this could be thatoutdated knowledge can impede the adoption of new configurations. Therefore, it is important for organizations to provide an appropriate environment for overcoming cultural barriers. Otherwise new knowledge will not be acted on or incorporated into new products and services.

Originality/value

The authors point out the importance for organizations of taking this perspective into account when they are seeking to respond proactively to the challenges thrown up by the external environment.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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Article

Anthony K.P. Wensley, Juan Gabriel Cegarra‐Navarro, Gabriel Cepeda‐Carrión and Antonio Genaro Leal Millán

Today, in small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs), entrepreneurs must take a more strategic perspective that is evidenced by the need to scan the enterprise to discover…

Abstract

Purpose

Today, in small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs), entrepreneurs must take a more strategic perspective that is evidenced by the need to scan the enterprise to discover how they might improve customer relations as well as promote improved entrepreneurial actions. The paper aims to focus on this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

This study examines the impact of the existence of an “open‐minded context” in an organisation at time (T) on actions that concern the challenging of entrepreneurial actions at time (T+1). It also examines the relationship between explorative and exploitation processes and customer relations. These relationships are examined through an empirical investigation of data obtained from 107 SMEs from the Spanish telecommunications industry, using partial least squares (PLS).

Findings

The results indicate that the effects of an “open‐minded context” at time (T) on customer relations at time (T+1) are mediated through the existence of explorative and exploitation knowledge processes at time (T+1).

Research limitations/implications

Practices which may be based on explicit knowledge or on tacit knowledge in the form of processes and routines need to be challenged prior to the adoption of new knowledge by the organisation. In such situations, it will be necessary to modify or even delete some knowledge in order to ensure that employees have access to the up‐to‐date explorative and exploitative knowledge processes necessary to maintain or enhance customer relations.

Practical implications

In situations where organisations and their members face rapidly changing environments it is necessary to challenge the entrepreneurial actions which have been derived from the founding entrepreneurs.

Originality/value

The paper examines how the nature and existence of an open‐mindedness context is linked to the nature and existence of knowledge exploration and exploitation processes enacted by the workforce of an organisation.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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Article

Gabriel Cepeda‐Carrión, Juan Gabriel Cegarra‐Navarro and Antonio G. Leal‐Millán

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of an organization's unlearning context and information systems (IS) capabilities on the organization's ability to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of an organization's unlearning context and information systems (IS) capabilities on the organization's ability to challenge basic beliefs and to implement processes that are explicitly or tacitly helpful in the reception of new ideas (absorptive capacity). The authors also seek to examine the relationship between absorptive capacity and the existence and enhancement of innovativeness.

Design/methodology/approach

These relationships are examined through an empirical investigation of 54 doctors and 62 nurses belonging to 44 hospital‐in‐the‐home units (HHU) in Spain.

Findings

The results show that absorptive capacity is an important dynamic determinant for developing a HHU's innovativeness. Moreover, this relationship is best explained with two related constructs. Firstly, the HHU's unlearning context plays a key role in managing the tension between potential absorptive capacity and realized absorptive capacity. Secondly, the results also shed light on a tangible means for health managers to enhance their units' innovativeness (quality of service) through IS capabilities.

Research limitations/implications

The cross‐sectional design does not allow observation of the short‐ and long‐term impact of absorptive capacity on the unlearning context, information systems capability and HHU's innovativeness. Although the model presented here proposes sequenced relationships between absorptive capacities (PACAP and RACAP), the unlearning context and IS capability, the authors measure all these constructs at one point in time.

Practical implications

This sequential model presented in this paper provides practical steps for managers interested in organizational structures that support organizational innovativeness.

Originality/value

The contribution of unlearning context is related to its ability to prepare the ground for innovation processes.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 50 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Content available
Article

Abstract

Details

Management Research: Journal of the Iberoamerican Academy of Management, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1536-5433

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Article

Gema Albort-Morant, Antonio L. Leal-Rodríguez and Valentina De Marchi

This paper aims to explore in depth how internal and external knowledge-based drivers actually affect the firms’ green innovation performance. Subsequently, this study…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore in depth how internal and external knowledge-based drivers actually affect the firms’ green innovation performance. Subsequently, this study analyzes the relationships between absorptive capacity (internal knowledge-based driver), relationship learning (external knowledge-based driver) and green innovation performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This study relies on a sample of 112 firms belonging to the Spanish automotive components manufacturing sector (ACMS) and uses partial least squares path modeling to test the hypotheses proposed.

Findings

The empirical results show that both absorptive capacity and relationship learning exert a significant positive effect on the dependent variable and that relationship learning moderates the link between absorptive capacity and green innovation performance.

Research limitations/implications

This paper presents some limitations with respect to the particular sector (i.e. the ACMS) and geographical context (Spain). For this reason, researchers must be thoughtful while generalizing these results to distinct scenarios.

Practical implications

Managers should devote more time and resources to reinforce their absorptive capacity as an important strategic tool to generate new knowledge and hence foster green innovation performance in manufacturing industries.

Social implications

The paper shows the importance of encouraging decision-makers to cultivate and rely on relationship learning mechanisms with their main stakeholders and to acquire the necessary information and knowledge that might be valuable in the maturity of green innovations.

Originality/value

This study proposes that relationship learning plays a moderating role in the relationship between absorptive capacity and green innovation performance.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article

Ángeles Montoro‐Sánchez and Domingo Ribeiro Soriano

The aim of this paper is to introduce the special issue on “Human resource management and corporate entrepreneurship”.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to introduce the special issue on “Human resource management and corporate entrepreneurship”.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper discuses the articles in the special issue, which investigate the relationships between human resource management and entrepreneurship from different points of view, approaches and employing different empirical contexts.

Findings

The papers highlight different human resource management factors of entrepreneurial behaviour and their influence on corporate entrepreneurship. Results from different empirical contexts as small and medium‐size firms, case studies, joint ventures, in the USA, China, and Spain, among others, make important contributions to the previous literature.

Originality/value

The paper discusses the intersection and association between human resource management and corporate entrepreneurship. Human resources play an essential role in so far as they can encourage or hinder corporate entrepreneurship.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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Article

Domingo Ribeiro‐Soriano and David Urbano

The purpose of this paper is to add new theoretical insights on the employee‐organization relationship (EOR) in the context of corporate entrepreneurship (CE)…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to add new theoretical insights on the employee‐organization relationship (EOR) in the context of corporate entrepreneurship (CE), specifically in collective entrepreneurship.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a brief overview of the content of each of the articles included in this special issue.

Findings

In the last decades, the study of the EOR has become an integral part of the literature as an approach aimed to provide the theoretical foundations to understanding the employee and employer perspectives to the exchange. Also, the greater complex environment and the higher level of innovativeness have pushed firms to become more entrepreneurial in order to identify new opportunities for sustained superior performance. In this context, emerges CE and involves not only formal activities to enhance product innovation, risk taking and a proactive response to environmental forces, but also organizational learning, driven by collaboration, and commitment. Specifically, different EORs and specific human resources management practices are required in the light of collective entrepreneurship, understood as work among entrepreneurial teams within the organizations and collaboration among employees.

Originality/value

The paper provides an overview of the EOR in collective entrepreneurship.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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Article

Lee Heng Wei, Ramayah Thurasamy and Simona Popa

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of human dimensions, team climates, and technological features on Global Virtual Team (GVT) performance in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of human dimensions, team climates, and technological features on Global Virtual Team (GVT) performance in the Malaysian Global Business Services (GBS) industry. Attention has also been paid to examine the moderating effect of team diversity and the extent of virtuality on GVT performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using structured questionnaire and tested using partial least square – structural equation modelling. The authors collected 263 sample and the assessment of reflective measurement models, structural model, reliability and validity were conducted subsequently.

Findings

This paper found that team climates like team cohesion, team confidence, and team knowledge, skills, and abilities demonstrated different impact on the human dimensions which include trust and creativity. It will then subsequently affect GVTs’ performance. Besides, team diversity which comprised of three major components that include age diversity, functional diversity, and attitudes/values diversity was found to moderate the relationships between the antecedents and consequent. In spite of that, the extent of virtuality was found to have no moderating effects on the relationships between the team creativity and trust and perceived team performance.

Originality/value

As nowadays an increasing number of firms are becoming global, inquiring into GVTs efficient management is of crucial importance for successful implementation of open innovation practices, while GBS companies could represent the most suitable setting to examine the GVT’s underlying principles. This paper integrates adaptive structuration theory with input-mediator-output-input model to provide a holistic study on GVTs’ performance. In addition, this study also illustrated how the extent of virtually can be measured quantitatively.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 56 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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