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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2018

Matthias Woeckener, Danielle L. Boisvert, Eric M. Cooke, Nicholas Kavish, Richard H. Lewis, Jessica Wells, Todd A. Armstrong, Eric J. Connolly and James M. Harper

Research reports a positive relationship between parental rejection and antisocial behavior in adolescents and young adults. Studies also report a positive association…

Abstract

Purpose

Research reports a positive relationship between parental rejection and antisocial behavior in adolescents and young adults. Studies also report a positive association between testosterone and antisocial behavior. The purpose of this paper is to examine whether testosterone moderates the influence of parental rejection on antisocial behavior in a sample of young adults.

Design/methodology/approach

The current study analyzed a sample of undergraduate students (N=322) to examine the interaction between testosterone and parental rejection in the prediction of antisocial behavior. Multivariate ordinary least squares (OLS) regression was used to explore this association.

Findings

Results from OLS regression models revealed that parental rejection and testosterone were independently associated with antisocial behavior and that the effect of parental rejection on antisocial behavior was stronger at higher levels of testosterone.

Originality/value

This current study is the first to examine how testosterone conditions the influence of parental rejection on antisocial behavior in young adults. Findings from the study add to the growing body of literature examining the interplay between biological and environmental factors.

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

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Article
Publication date: 9 September 2014

J. Carmelo Visdómine-Lozano

– The purpose of this paper is to introduce a contextualistic account of antisocial responding, with the addition of recent developments on the study of personality.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a contextualistic account of antisocial responding, with the addition of recent developments on the study of personality.

Design/methodology/approach

A behavioural and contextualistic view point is developed to account for antisocial personality and related topics, inasmuch as traditional definitions of antisocial personality disorder as provided on formal diagnostic manuals derive on several and not always coherent classifications of antisocial behaviours. Some of these classifications centre on issues like guilt, impulsivity or aggressiveness for establishing different types of offending and antisocial patterns. This paper focuses on functional personal backgrounds.

Findings

A total of five types of “potentiated contingencies” are described as being the main underpinnings involved in antisocial patterns. An analysis of the transformation of aversive functions of antisocial behaviours, leads to specify a distinctive rule-following behaviour that is concerned with that responding. Finally, the exposition of the four verbal clinical contexts that behaviour analysis highlights as taking place at therapeutic settings, serves to propose a fitter contextualistic intervention for antisocial personality patterns.

Research limitations/implications

Novel investigations should contrast the functional classification of antisocial responding. Those studies should experimentally demonstrate the way in which the different instances of transformation of antisocial functions the author has described are prompted.

Practical implications

The analysis also allows for the anticipation of the behaviour of individuals fitting to every category of antisocial avoidance. And as the functional analysis of “antisocial avoidance” uncovers specific relations between environmental stimuli as they are produced and established in the history of interactions of individuals, a more fitting intervention based upon those relations is feasible.

Originality/value

An exhaustive functional taxonomy of antisocial personalities and delinquent behaviours has never been presented before elsewhere. Besides the author reinterprets from a contextualist position traditional empirical studies.

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

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Article
Publication date: 14 February 2020

Po-Chien Chang, Ting Wu and Juan Du

The purpose of this study is to examine the dual effects of the violation of psychological contract on patient’s antisocial behaviour via the mediator of patient trust and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the dual effects of the violation of psychological contract on patient’s antisocial behaviour via the mediator of patient trust and the role of doctor-patient communication as a critical contingent variable in the psychological contract violation of patient’s antisocial behaviour relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected from 483 hospitalized patients distributed in Shanxi province, China by using a self-administered survey.

Findings

The results indicated that psychological contract violation is positively associated with patient antisocial behaviour via patient trust. Moreover, the study found that doctor-patient communication moderates the mediated effects of psychological contract violation on patient’s antisocial behaviour through patient trust; that is, the mediated effect on antisocial behaviour is weaker when both doctor and patients have more communication.

Research limitations/implications

Due to a cross-sectional design in nature, the causal relationship cannot be developed based on the results. Despite the limitation, the present study provides insights for improving doctor-patient relationship by emphasizing the importance of increasing patient trust and doctor-patient communication.

Practical implications

To improve the quality of doctor-patient relationship, this study addresses the significance of properly showing understandings and care to regain mutual trust and reducing the likelihood of patient’s antisocial behaviour.

Social implications

The research findings have implications for both the health system and medical schools in China to reinforce the professional ethics and improve their medical humanities as the main concerns to generate a more sustainable doctor–patient relationship.

Originality/value

This study includes patient trust as a mediator and doctor-patient communication as a moderator to investigate the moderated mediation relationship among patients and medical professionals. By further examining the doctor-patient relationship, the results may not only help improve the efficient implementation of medical practices but also support the institutes and develop medical professionals for more positive doctor-patient relationships.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Laurier Fortin

Students’ antisocial behavior can often lead to violence in school. Longitudinal studies pertaining to antisocial behavior have contributed considerably to the development…

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Abstract

Students’ antisocial behavior can often lead to violence in school. Longitudinal studies pertaining to antisocial behavior have contributed considerably to the development of knowledge in this field of research. This knowledge now enables us to identify the different developmental stages of aggressive and antisocial behavior during childhood and adolescence. Consequently, we are better able to identify antisocial behavior in the classroom, to describe the developmental pathways leading to antisocial behavior, to identify the risk factors relating to this issue and finally, to predict who might be at‐risk of developing antisocial behavior. In the past, antisocial behavior was conceived as following a single developmental pathway encompassing several categories of behavioral problems. Now, on the other hand, many studies demonstrate how the development of these behaviors can be explained through different pathways.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 41 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2013

Isabel Brunton and Tom Hartley

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether the Enhanced Thinking Skills (ETS) programme, prepared for the Joint Prison Probation Service Accreditation Panel…

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351

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether the Enhanced Thinking Skills (ETS) programme, prepared for the Joint Prison Probation Service Accreditation Panel, might reduce antisocial behaviour if delivered to school‐aged children.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents two studies. In the first, adult offenders' executive function was measured before and after undertaking the ETS course, using a self report form. Change in behaviour following the course was assessed using behaviour checklists completed by prison staff. In the second study, schoolchildren's executive function was measured using a self report form and their behaviour was also assessed using a comparable behaviour checklist.

Findings

The results showed an association between antisocial behaviour and poor executive function in both offenders and schoolchildren. Offenders displayed less antisocial behaviour following the ETS course. Executive function and antisocial behaviour measured before the ETS course predicted reduction in antisocial behaviour following the course.

Research limitations/implications

The studies do not establish a causal role for the ETS programme in reducing antisocial behaviour, and it was not possible to investigate the effect of the programme in schoolchildren. However, the results indicate that further research may be fruitful.

Practical implications

The possibility that an adapted ETS programme might lead to a reduction in antisocial behaviour in schoolchildren should be investigated. Behavior checklists and measures of executive function should guide the selection of individuals joining the ETS programme.

Originality/value

The findings suggest that the ETS programme might be effective outside a criminal justice setting, as an early intervention with schoolchildren aimed at preventing later offending.

Details

The Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

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Article
Publication date: 2 April 2019

Andra McGauran, Matthew Brooks and Roxanne Khan

Despite a robust link between poor caregiver attachment and antisociality, few studies have examined the influence of parentification and emotional resilience on…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite a robust link between poor caregiver attachment and antisociality, few studies have examined the influence of parentification and emotional resilience on delinquency in later life, in groups at differing risk for antisocial conduct. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This pilot study compared the influence of parentification, attachment style (avoidance or anxious) and emotional resilience on adulthood antisocial behaviour in an offender and normative sample. Of the 137 participants in this study, 66 were supervised by the National Probation Service (age M=36.90, SD=13.91), and 71 were recruited from community-dwelling and student populations (age M=31.83, SD=13.25).

Findings

In partial support of the predictions, participants in the offender group reported significantly greater levels of attachment anxiety compared to the normative group. However, emotional resilience was positively associated with antisociality in the normative sample.

Research limitations/implications

This small-scale investigation indicates value in exploring these specific variables in a larger, matched samples study, to enable clearer comparisons to be made between offender and normative groups.

Practical implications

The preliminary findings suggest that attachment anxiety is associated with antisociality in offender populations, which indicate a therapeutic focus on attachment anxiety as part of correctional care and offender rehabilitation.

Originality/value

This study is novel in its aim to examine the influence of childhood parentification, attachment deficits and emotional resilience on adulthood antisociality in participants from a high-risk offender sample and non-high-risk normative sample.

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

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Book part
Publication date: 25 March 2011

Danielle Boisvert and Jamie Vaske

While the field of criminology is rooted in sociological tradition, biosocial criminology has emerged as a promising perspective in studying antisocial behaviors. This…

Abstract

While the field of criminology is rooted in sociological tradition, biosocial criminology has emerged as a promising perspective in studying antisocial behaviors. This perspective encompasses the research from other scientific disciplines, namely behavioral genetics and molecular genetics. At its core, biosocial criminology views criminal behavior as a function of both the social environment as well as biological/genetic factors. This chapter will provide a description of the prominent methodologies used in behavioral genetics and molecular genetics, a review of the empirical research, an overview of some of the statistical and methodological issues, as well as a discussion on the potential avenues for future research.

Details

Biology and Politics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-580-9

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Article
Publication date: 21 July 2010

Gregory O'Brien, John Taylor, William Lindsay, Anthony Holland, Derek Carson, Lesley Steptoe, Karen Price, Claire Middleton and Jessica Wheeler

This study was carried out as part of a larger study commissioned by the UK Department of Health to investigate the service pathways for offenders with learning…

Abstract

This study was carried out as part of a larger study commissioned by the UK Department of Health to investigate the service pathways for offenders with learning disabilities (LD). The study covered three health regions in the UK and included 477 people with LD referred to services because of antisocial or offending behaviour during a 12‐month period. Data were collected concerning demographic, individual, offending behaviour and service characteristics. The findings of the study are broadly consistent with contemporary research concerning this population, particularly in relation to the nature and frequency of offending, history of offending, psychopathology, age and gender distribution. However, very few of those referred had any form of structured care plan, despite having significant offending histories, and this may have compromised early identification of their needs and communication between the health, social and other services involved.

Details

Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0927

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2018

Zachary Giano, Michael J. Merten and Brooke Tuttle

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between persistently sleeping away from the home as a predictor of adolescent delinquency in a largely Latino…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between persistently sleeping away from the home as a predictor of adolescent delinquency in a largely Latino sample of 91 adolescents.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employs multiple linear regressions to examine the relationship between sleeping away from the home (IV) and antisocial behavior and substance use (DVs) with dangerous neighborhood characteristics as a moderator.

Findings

Results show that sleeping away from the home on a persistent basis is a significant predictor of antisocial behavior and substance use. Neighborhood characteristics moderated the effect of sleeping away on substance use only. One possible explanation includes opportunities for increased time with deviant peers that is created by persistently sleeping away from home. Additionally, sleeping away from the home may allow adolescents from strict households to opportunistically engage in delinquent behavior in households with less strict rules.

Originality/value

Although sleeping away is a common behavior often encouraged by parents as a part of social learning, there is evidence to suggest that it could be potentially detrimental, particularly amplified when the adolescent lives in more dangerous neighborhoods. To date, this is the first study to examine the effects of persistently sleeping away from the home on adolescent delinquency.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Article
Publication date: 2 July 2016

Morten Hesse and Birgitte Thylstrup

This article presents the Impulsive Lifestyle Counselling program, a time-limited psychoeducational approach to increasing patient awareness of antisocial personality…

Abstract

Purpose

This article presents the Impulsive Lifestyle Counselling program, a time-limited psychoeducational approach to increasing patient awareness of antisocial personality disorder and its consequences.

Design/methodology/approach

This article describes the ILC program, a program developed as an add-on to treatment for substance use disorders, gives examples of issues and patient-counsellor interactions in the ILC sessions.

Findings

During the ILC sessions the patients engaged with the counsellors in diverse ways, reflecting the varying levels of psychopathology and overall functioning and barriers and incentive for lifestyle changes.

Originality/value

Patients with substance use disorder and comorbid antisocial personality disorder can receive better care with brief counselling that focuses on antisocial behavior and thinking. More diverse evidence-based treatments are needed for this disorder.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 9 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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