Search results

1 – 10 of over 1000
Article
Publication date: 23 October 2007

He Ping

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the merits and disadvantages of the law of the People's Republic of China on anti‐money laundering.

686

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the merits and disadvantages of the law of the People's Republic of China on anti‐money laundering.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes the main contents contained in the newly adopted law of the People's Republic of China on anti‐money laundering, celebrates the enactment of the law and points out the gap still remaining between Chinese legislation and international standards.

Findings

The enactment of the law of the People's Republic of China on anti‐money laundering is of vital significance. Based on the international experience in the fight against money laundering, Chinese anti‐moneylaundering legislation has made considerable progress. Its shortcomings, however, are also evident.

Originality/value

This paper presents a comprehensive description of, and comments on, the law of the People's Republic of China, which would be beneficial to the legislature.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 October 2019

Lisanawati Go and Njoto Benarkah

This paper aims to explore the obstacles that the ethical guidelines of legal professionals pose in the implementation of an effective anti-money laundering regime…

302

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the obstacles that the ethical guidelines of legal professionals pose in the implementation of an effective anti-money laundering regime, established in the law on anti-money laundering in Indonesia. Some compliance schemes have been developed to integrate the participation of gatekeepers in anti-money laundering efforts, but the solution to mitigate the challenges must be implemented through the participation of the legal profession.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a qualitative research methodology, including a triangulation of interviews with relevant experts, literature review and analysis of regulations. A deductive approach is employed to analyse the data.

Findings

The legal profession’s ethical regulations and laws were considered to be the cause for the Indonesian Government’s inability to implement the anti-money laundering regime. The findings show two practical solutions that could be implemented: A government policy for the amendment of the anti-money laundering law and organizational policy to increase support for the anti-money laundering regime; and active participation of legal professionals in an effective anti-money laundering regime in Indonesia.

Originality/value

This study provides insight into the participation of the legal profession in anti-money laundering efforts.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 October 2019

Ronald F. Pol

This paper aims to increase the transparency of information in official anti-money laundering rating data to assist evidence-informed decision-making in compliance…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to increase the transparency of information in official anti-money laundering rating data to assist evidence-informed decision-making in compliance, policy-making and research.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper converts anti-money laundering rating data into information-rich visualisations, reintroduces a comparison methodology and ranks all anti-money laundering regimes evaluated to date.

Findings

Official anti-money laundering ratings as currently structured and presented offer surprisingly little policy-relevant information. Persistent failure to transform available data into information for knowledge and insight suggests that the risk has been realised that impressionistic judgments or politicised interests drive the policy agenda at least as much as objective evidence or substantive economic and social goals.

Practical implications

Any reluctance to generate policy-relevant information from the industry’s primary data set or disinclination to engage constructively with a growing body of independent critical policy effectiveness evidence calls into question whether implementing anti-money laundering controls with some prospect of achieving substantial societal benefits, or perpetuating the current system, prevails.

Originality/value

With a dearth of scholarship at the intersection of money laundering and policy effectiveness scholarship and practice, this paper combines elements of these disciplines and examines anti-money laundering effectiveness from a different viewpoint. Rather than seeking to measure money laundering or estimate the proportion of criminal proceeds successfully intercepted, this paper draws directly from the anti-money laundering industry’s own “main” data set.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 21 January 2020

Ronald F. Pol

The purpose of this paper is to utilise underused information in anti-money laundering rating data to assist policymaking and research.

858

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to utilise underused information in anti-money laundering rating data to assist policymaking and research.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper explores what evidence “hidden in plain sight” in official anti-money laundering rating data reveals about claims justifying the expansion of money laundering controls in response to European bank scandals.

Findings

A perceived lack of international coordination influencing the policy response to a series of alleged anti-money laundering breaches does not accord with the anti-money laundering industry’s own evidence base.

Practical implications

Responding to new crises with superficial solutions without addressing fundamental questions with a multi-disciplinary perspective risks repeating and extending a decade-long cycle of ineffectiveness in efforts to mitigate the social and economic harms from profit-motivated crime.

Originality/value

This paper draws fresh conclusions from the anti-money laundering industry’s “main” data set, underused in policymaking and research.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 3 May 2022

Elissavet-Anna Valvi

The aim of the present study is to shed light on the role of legal practitioners, namely, lawyers and notaries, in the fight against money laundering: Are they considered…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the present study is to shed light on the role of legal practitioners, namely, lawyers and notaries, in the fight against money laundering: Are they considered as facilitators or obstacles against money laundering? How does the global and the EU legal framework deal with the legal professionals?

Design/methodology/approach

The research follows a deductive approach attempting to respond to questions such as: How do the lawyers’ and notaries’ societies react in front of the anti-money laundering measures that concern them and why? What are the discrepancies between the lawyers’ professional secrecy and the obligations that EU anti-money laundering legislation assigns them?

Findings

This study disclosures the response of the European union and international legal and regulatory framework as well as the reflexes of the international and European legal professionals’ associations to this danger. It also demonstrates the reaction of lawyers against European union anti-money laundering legislation, to the point that it limits not only the confidentiality principle but also the position of the European judicial systems to the contradiction between this principle and the lawyers’ obligation to report their suspicions to the authorities.

Research limitations/implications

To fulfil the study goals, it was necessary to overcome some obstacles, like the limitation of existing sources. Indeed, transnational empirical research considering the professionals who facilitate money laundering is narrow. Besides, policymakers and academics only recently expressed more interest in money laundering and its facilitators.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils an identified need to study the legal professionals’ role not only in money laundering practices but also in anti-money laundering policies.

Article
Publication date: 7 October 2014

Muhammad Usman Kemal

The purpose of this study is to check the effectiveness of anti-money laundering (AML) regulations in Pakistan. The study investigates and analyses some key variables that…

4420

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to check the effectiveness of anti-money laundering (AML) regulations in Pakistan. The study investigates and analyses some key variables that may be influencing the effectiveness of anti-money regulations in Pakistan. Money laundering is most prevalent in the banking sector, as banks deals with the money’s deposition, withdrawal and transfer, therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the effectiveness of anti-money regulations on subjective judgments. It is an exploratory study in which I have tried to find the relationship and impact of three regulations, which are customer record keeping, employee training and suspicious transaction reporting on money laundering.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of hundred responses has been collected from employees working in different banks located in Rawalpindi and Lahore through questionnaire. Questionnaire has been developed on the basis of different dimensions of the research variables.

Findings

It has been found that that there is an impact of employee training on money laundering in banking system. A moderate inverse relationship between employee training and money laundering and anti-money laundering regulation of customer record keeping has weak impact on money laundering in developing countries.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited to Pakistan only, and to apply the same concept in other countries, researchers need to check the financial institutions of that country as well.

Originality/value

It has been suggested that to stop money laundry, special budget should be allocated for the capacity building of employees through training. Timely guidance and assistance of foreign-trained instructors or experts in combating money laundering should be taken. Implementation of anti-money laundering regulations should be transparent, consistent and timely.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

Jackie Johnson

Over the last two years a number of initiatives have been brought to the attention of the financial regulators sectors of the global financial system most at risk from…

Abstract

Over the last two years a number of initiatives have been brought to the attention of the financial regulators sectors of the global financial system most at risk from money laundering. The Durban Declaration called for the return of wealth plundered by corrupt leaders. The Financial Action Task Force (FATF), the Financial Stability Forum (FSF) and the OECD all identified countries with unregulated or poorly regulated financial systems which encourage money laundering and the US Senate identified problems with correspondent banking. This added attention has encouraged more countries to join the anti‐money laundering movement and there are now 116 member countries in anti‐money laundering groups in Europe, Asia, South America and Africa. However, until their legislation is effectively implemented and the remaining countries join the global anti‐money laundering movement there is unlikely to be any significant reduction in the amount of money being laundered.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Charles S. Gittleman and Russell D. Sacks

To describe and to discuss the implications of the US Department of the Treasury's PATRIOT Act regulations requiring “covered financial institutions” (including…

315

Abstract

Purpose

To describe and to discuss the implications of the US Department of the Treasury's PATRIOT Act regulations requiring “covered financial institutions” (including broker‐dealers, banks, and mutual funds) to maintain risk‐based procedures to ensure that: correspondent accounts held on behalf of specified non‐US financial institutions; and private banking accounts, are subject to due diligence procedures to ensure that those accounts, and the financial institutions holding those accounts, are not being used for money laundering purposes.

Design/methodology/approach

Summarizes and analyzes the adopted rules.

Findings

Since the passage of the USA PATRIOT Act, regulation relating to anti‐money laundering has been among the highest profile – and highest priority – activity of securities and financial institution regulation. Consequently, anti‐money laundering rules and regulations have become a major aspect of compliance programs at financial institutions such as banks and broker‐dealers. The rules that are the subject of this article are noteworthy in part because they continue the trend of widening the universe of “financial institutions” that are now subject to substantial anti‐money laundering regulation. The rules described in this article add substantially to the complexity of anti‐money laundering regulation at financial institutions for a number of reasons, including: firstly, placing new, broad‐based requirements on financial institutions; secondly, requiring those financial institutions to make judgments regarding both the level of risk posed by certain accounts and the appropriate diligence that may be necessary for each such account; and thirdly, interpretive and implementation challenges.

Originality/value

A summary and analysis of new anti‐money laundering regulation, which comes at a time when US regulators are placing substantial emphasis on anti‐money laundering.

Details

Journal of Investment Compliance, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1528-5812

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2001

Kern Alexander

This paper analyses the international regime of rules, principles and standards designed to reduce the risk of money laundering in the international financial system. The…

1725

Abstract

This paper analyses the international regime of rules, principles and standards designed to reduce the risk of money laundering in the international financial system. The international anti‐moneylaundering regime ranges from a variety of soft law (non‐binding) principles and rules that involve voluntary cooperative arrangements among states that have evolved in recent years, to a more specific legal framework that binds an increasing number of major states. In particular, the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) and its member states have played a crucial role in developing international norms and rules that require financial institutions to adopt minimum levels of transparency and disclosure to prevent financial crime. The FATF has focused its anti‐moneylaundering efforts on financial institutions because of the ease with which criminal groups have used financial institutions to transmit the proceeds of their illicit activities and because of the threat that money laundering poses to the systemic stability of financial systems.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

Article
Publication date: 7 October 2019

Eugene E. Mniwasa

This paper aims to examine how banks in Tanzania have been vulnerable to money laundering activities and how the banking institutions have been implicated in enabling or…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine how banks in Tanzania have been vulnerable to money laundering activities and how the banking institutions have been implicated in enabling or aiding the commission of money laundering offences, and highlights the banks’ failure or inability to prevent, detect and thwart money laundering committed through their financial systems.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper explores Tanzania’s anti-money laundering law and analyzes non-law factors that make the banks exposed to money laundering activities. It looks at law-related, political and economic circumstances that impinge on the banks’ efficacy to tackle money laundering offences committed through their systems. The data are sourced from policy documents, statutes, case law and literature from Tanzania and other jurisdictions.

Findings

Both law-related and non-law factors create an enabling environment for the commission of money laundering offences, and this exposes banks in Tanzania to money laundering activities. Some banks have been implicated in enabling or aiding money laundering offences. These banks have abdicated their obligations to fight against money laundering. This is attributed to the fact that the banks’ internal anti-money laundering policies, regulations and procedures are inefficient, and Tanzania’s legal framework is generally ineffective to tackle money laundering offences.

Originality/value

This paper uncovers a multi-faceted nature of money laundering affecting banks in Tanzania. It is recommended that Tanzania’s anti-money laundering policy should address law-related, political, economic and other factors that create an enabling environment for the commission of money laundering offences. Tanzania’s anti-money laundering law should be reformed to enhance its efficacy and, lastly, banks should reinforce their internal anti-money laundering policies and regulations and policies.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

Keywords

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