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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Soma Pillay

The effect of corruption in South Africa has seriously constrained development of the national economy and has significantly inhibited good governance in the country…

Abstract

The effect of corruption in South Africa has seriously constrained development of the national economy and has significantly inhibited good governance in the country. South Africa's complex political design is a contributing factor to the rise of corruption, which has adversely affected stability and trust and which has damaged the ethos of democratic values and principles. Although the South African government has been instrumental in systems to fight the evils of corruption, practical problems have increasingly emerged over the years. The most notable problems are: insufficient coordination of anti‐corruption work within the South African public service and among the various sectors of society; poor information about corruption and the impact of anti‐corruption measures and agencies; and the impact of corruption on good governance. This paper is a part of a broader study undertaken on corruption. It addresses issues related to corruption and good governance in the South African (National) Public Service. To articulate and analyse the challenges confronting the country, issues regarding coordination of anti‐corruption agencies will be explored.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 17 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 3 February 2012

Bryane Michael and Stephen Mendes

Macedonian municipalities should pass anti‐corruption ordinances in order to reduce corruption. The purpose of this paper is to review the legal issues involved in…

Abstract

Purpose

Macedonian municipalities should pass anti‐corruption ordinances in order to reduce corruption. The purpose of this paper is to review the legal issues involved in drafting such ordinances and provide legal advisors to local councils with the legal and economic analysis needed to tackle some of the more difficult and detailed questions.

Design/methodology/approach

The most important issue revolves around the creation of a model ordinance which Macedonian municipalities (or the Association of Units of Local Self‐Government of the Republic of Macedonia) could adopt in order to set‐up and run municipal‐level anti‐corruption agencies. The location of such agencies as well as their competencies (to monitor conflicts of interests, oversee asset declarations, and conduct corruption risk‐audits among others) are analysed. The paper also provides legal interpretations of Macedonian legislation and their likely impact on municipal council ordinance design in the area of anti‐corruption – providing the legal basis for positive administrative silence, the splitting of municipal procurement contracts, and (most controversially) qui tam rewards at the municipal level.

Findings

A brief regulatory impact analysis of the ordinance shows a gain of €162,900 in social welfare if such a programme were rolled‐out in Macedonia.

Originality/value

The present paper provides some of the legal analysis which previous papers lack.

Details

International Journal of Law and Management, vol. 54 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-243X

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Book part
Publication date: 8 November 2004

Denita Cepiku

The primary aim of this chapter is to offer an overview of corruption and state capture in Albanian public administration and to describe the solutions adopted to fight…

Abstract

The primary aim of this chapter is to offer an overview of corruption and state capture in Albanian public administration and to describe the solutions adopted to fight corruption by the government since 1998. Conflict of interest is a new aspect of concern in the policy agendas. OECD countries have recently adopted some guidelines for managing the phenomenon, which will be then transferred to eastern European countries. Given this novelty, this chapter does not deal directly with conflict of interest situations. Corruption is rarely treated as a management problem, in part because for obvious reasons as data are scarce and also because the literature is thin and tentative, with few theoretical frameworks. Also rare is analysis of how corruption has been or might be reduced. The state of research on corruption is such that there is little inductive theory or statistical evidence about the kinds of policies that work under particular conditions.

Details

Strategies for Public Management Reform
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-218-4

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2008

Steve Berkman, Nancy Z. Boswell, Franz H. Brüner, Mark Gough, John T. McCormick, Peter Egens Pedersen, Jose Ugaz and Stephen Zimmermann

The purpose of this paper is to offer anti‐corruption experts' personal assessments of the progress international organizations have made in fighting corruption.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer anti‐corruption experts' personal assessments of the progress international organizations have made in fighting corruption.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper contains a survey of the viewpoints of a number of anti‐corruption experts who themselves are current or former staff of international organizations, or who – from their positions within the private sector or in non‐governmental organizations – are able to offer a unique and distanced perspective on the key corruption‐related issues and challenges facing international organizations today.

Findings

It is agreed that international organizations today are at a cross‐roads in their individual and collective fight against corruption. International organizations must weather the corruption scandals that have recently plagued several organizations, and must confront the question of whether their staffs, boards, and member governments indeed have the ability, will, and commitment to fight corruption. To address these challenges, international organizations must adopt proactive investigative strategies when combating corruption, seek greater cooperation with each other, and must ensure that their respective investigation units have the necessary resources and independence to effectively detect, investigate, and prevent corruption.

Originality/value

The paper offers a realistic prognosis on the future of the anti‐corruption movement within and among international organizations.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 January 2015

Ernie Ko, Yu-Chang Su and Chilik Yu

The purpose of this paper is to provide insights into the multiple anti-corruption agencies (ACAs) in Taiwan and their conflict resolution. The birth of the Agency Against…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide insights into the multiple anti-corruption agencies (ACAs) in Taiwan and their conflict resolution. The birth of the Agency Against Corruption (AAC) in 2011 created the unintended consequence of sibling rivalry with the elder Ministry of Justice Investigation Bureau (MJIB).

Design/methodology/approach

A historical background of these agencies is discussed and followed by an analysis of the diversified conflicts among the prosecutor’s office, the AAC and the MJIB. The empirical sources of this study include 17 in-depth interviews with government officials both at ministerial level and field level, scholars and NGO representatives.

Findings

The redundancy of ACAs in Taiwan is a fact, which is extremely difficult to change in the foreseeable future in the light of current political and fiscal constraints. This paper concludes that the conflicts among multiple ACAs and their operational weaknesses will not fade away after a mere directive from their superior, the Ministry of Justice, unless genuine cooperation is put into place in various individual cases.

Practical implications

This paper provides a road-map for decision makers to improve collective anti-corruption performance. Taiwan’s AAC serves as the latest example testing the efficacy of the multiple specialized ACAs.

Originality/value

This pioneering study provides insights into Taiwan’s anti-corruption policy and practices. More investigative studies should be conducted on the effectiveness of multiple ACAs in other countries.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2021

Dmytro S. Melnyk, Oleg A. Parfylo, Oleksii V. Butenko, Olena V. Tykhonova and Volodymyr O. Zarosylo

The experience of most European Union (EU) Member States has demonstrated effective anti-corruption practices, making the EU one of the leaders in this field, which can be…

Abstract

Purpose

The experience of most European Union (EU) Member States has demonstrated effective anti-corruption practices, making the EU one of the leaders in this field, which can be used as an example to learn from in the field of anti-corruption. The purpose of this study is to analyze and identify the main features of anti-corruption legislation and strategies to prevent corruption at the national and supranational levels of the EU.

Design/methodology/approach

The following methods were used in the work: discourse and content analysis, method of system analysis, method of induction and deduction, historical-legal method, formal-legal method, comparative-legal method and others. Using the historical and legal method, the evolution of the formation of anti-corruption regulation at the supranational level was revealed. The comparative law method helped to compare the practices of the Member States of the EU in the field of anti-corruption regulation. The formal-legal method is used for generalization, classification and systematization of research results, as well as for the correct presentation of these results.

Findings

The main results, prospects for further research and the value of the material. The paper offers a critical review of key EU legal instruments on corruption, from the first initiatives taken in the mid-1990s to recent years.

Originality/value

In addition, the article analyzes the relevant anti-corruption legislation in the EU member states that are in the top 10 countries with the lowest level of corruption, namely: Denmark, Finland, Sweden, the Netherlands, Germany and Luxembourg.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Sophal Ear

The purpose of this paper is to provide a critical analysis and survey of Cambodia’s recent efforts to combat corruption. It explores the policy context, perceived extent…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a critical analysis and survey of Cambodia’s recent efforts to combat corruption. It explores the policy context, perceived extent of corruption, causes of corruption, anti-corruption measures, evaluates those anti-corruption measures, and provides policy recommendations.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews the literature on corruption and anti-corruption efforts in Cambodia. It relies on available data from the World Bank and Transparency International, and compares these data over time.

Findings

The paper shows that corruption in Cambodia is pervasive and that anti-corruption efforts are limited because of a lack of political will. Existing anti-corruption measures designed with loopholes must be amended, but implementation remains the primary challenge.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the limited literature on combating corruption in Cambodia.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Grant W Walton

– The purpose of this paper is to examine the key causes of and solutions to corruption in Papua New Guinea (PNG) and suggest ways for improving anti-corruption efforts.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the key causes of and solutions to corruption in Papua New Guinea (PNG) and suggest ways for improving anti-corruption efforts.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper comprises a desk-based review of academic literature, policy documents and media.

Findings

Fighting corruption in PNG requires an understanding of and response to local political, historic, cultural and economic issues. In particular, anti-corruption actors need to pay attention to: first, the opportunities and threats associated with state politics; second, the structural conditions that cause citizens to support corruption; third, the role of non-state actors in causing corruption; and fourth, ensuring stronger legal responses to corruption that result in prosecutions.

Originality/value

This paper highlights key issues which anti-corruption organisations in PNG should address, examines state and non-state causes of corruption, and provides an updated analysis of key drives and solutions to corruption in PNG.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 January 2015

Eric Vincent C. Batalla

– The purpose of this paper is to examine the anti-corruption performance of the Philippine government, particularly under the leadership of President Benigno Aquino III.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the anti-corruption performance of the Philippine government, particularly under the leadership of President Benigno Aquino III.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper evaluates the anti-corruption measures as represented by pertinent laws as well as anti-corruption agencies (ACAs) under the Aquino administration.

Findings

The Aquino government has exercised remarkable political will in acting on high-profile cases involving former government officials, including former President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo. However, the government’s overall anti-corruption performance is hampered by outdated and conflicting laws, lack of compliance with anti-corruption laws and regulations by public officials and employees, poor ACA operational capacities, judicial inefficiency, deficient organizational systems and change-resistant government agencies, and selective and partial enforcement of anti-corruption laws. These problems are characteristic of Philippine political administrations and are arguably rooted in a system long characterized by fragile state institutions, strong oligarchic control, and weak citizenship.

Originality/value

The paper is intended to update scholars, policy makers, and anti-corruption practitioners interested in corruption, ACA performance, and political reform in the Philippines. It discusses corruption-related problems of public administration within the purview of political economy. Based on this perspective, it argues that the key to effective control of corruption is a change in the political system’s configuration rather than the mere change in leadership.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2020

Haitham Nobanee, Osama F. Atayah and Charilaos Mertzanis

This paper aims to test the levels of anti-corruption disclosure and its implication on the banking performance of both conventional and Islamic banks listed on the Abu…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to test the levels of anti-corruption disclosure and its implication on the banking performance of both conventional and Islamic banks listed on the Abu Dhabi Securities Exchange and Dubai Financial Market.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors have used the content analysis to identify the levels of anti-corruption disclosure in the banks’ annual reports. They have also used the two-steps generalized method of moments (GMM) regression applied to dynamic panel data analysis to examine the effect of the anti-corruption disclosure on the banking performance.

Findings

The empirical results show that the anti-corruption disclosure is at low levels for all banks and conventional and Islamic banks samples. The results also show no significant differences in the anti-corruption disclosure between Islamic and conventional banks. The results of the two-steps GMM regression applied to dynamic panel data analysis show a negative and significant impact of the levels of anti-corruption disclosure on the bank’s performance for both all banks and conventional banks; the results of the dynamic panel data analysis show an insignificant impact of anti-corruption discloser for the Islamic banks' sample.

Practical implications

The findings recommended a comprehensive framework of anti-corruption disclosure to the central banks and financial market regulators to enhance anti-corruption practices within the financial institutions to increase transparency and enhance their performance.

Originality/value

Fighting against anti-corruption is essential for financial institutions. This paper is the first study that examined the extent of anti-corruption levels and their effect on banking performance for both Islamic and conventional banks operates in the UAE. The findings help in enhancing reporting practices in terms of anti-corruption to improve transparency and performance in the banking sector.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

Keywords

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