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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2000

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/09604520010307049. When citing…

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/09604520010307049. When citing the article, please cite: Anthony T. Allred, H. Lon Addams, (2000), “Service quality at banks and credit unions: what do their customers say?”, Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, Vol. 10 Iss: 1, pp. 52 - 6.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Anthony T. Allred

John M. Browning was the greatest gun maker the world has ever known. The company he created has been recognized for a century as the industry leader in innovation and…

Abstract

John M. Browning was the greatest gun maker the world has ever known. The company he created has been recognized for a century as the industry leader in innovation and quality. A host of changes in external factors like social values and politics have brought the Browning company and the firearms industry to a major crossroad. If the industry survives, service quality will likely be the core‐competency that drives future sales and market share. The study examines a Browning task force committee whose charge was to define and implement the “best there is” in customer service. Major barriers to service quality are identified. Principles for improving service quality and customer retention are discussed in detail.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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Article
Publication date: 27 November 2017

Anthony T. Allred and Clinton Amos

The purpose of this study is to examine the usefulness of disgust imagery in a nonprofit organization context as one part of the broader social marketing paradigm.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the usefulness of disgust imagery in a nonprofit organization context as one part of the broader social marketing paradigm.

Design/methodology/approach

An experiment was conducted in the child victim segment of the market using disgust and nondisgust images. Data were collected from 167 subjects via Amazon’s Mechanical Turk. Dependent variables measured included donation intention, empathy and guilt. Control variables included religiosity and attitude toward helping others, along with demographic factors.

Findings

MANCOVA results indicate that while the disgust image evoked greater empathy, the nondisgust image evoked greater donation intentions. The disgust image had a nonsignificant effect on the level of guilt felt by subjects. Mediation analysis indicates that empathy serves as a competitive mediator for the disgust–donation intentions relationship.

Research limitations/implications

This study examines the effects of disgust images on empathy, guilt and donation intentions. Although the findings indicate a contrasting effect of disgust on empathy and donation intentions, more research is needed to validate these findings with diverse samples, contexts and various donation behavior measures. Regarding charitable giving, the current findings suggest caution should be used when using disgust images to evoke empathy, as the tactic may also negatively affect donation intentions.

Social implications

Nonprofits that effectively apply marketing can change individual and community behavior. To continue their work, they rely on donors and volunteers. This study provides social marketers.

Originality/value

Past research has demonstrated the effectiveness of disgust appeals for deterring behavior. In contrast, this research provides unique insights into disgust appeals as a catalyst for motivating behavior. This research provides a much-needed empirical evaluation of disgust appeals in a social marketing context.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2001

Anthony T. Allred

Service quality in the USA has become a frustrating and unsatisfying experience. Recent indicators suggest customer satisfaction with service has been steadily declining…

Abstract

Service quality in the USA has become a frustrating and unsatisfying experience. Recent indicators suggest customer satisfaction with service has been steadily declining. The financial services sector is no exception. Existing research indicates credit union customers are more satisfied with service quality than bank customers. Current studies also suggest service quality and employee satisfaction are linked to customer satisfaction. Surveys were administered to bank and credit union employees about service quality they receive from their managers. The results did not support the study’s hypothesis that credit union managers would receive higher scores than bank managers. However, the results and implications are important for researchers and practitioners interested in improving service quality at banks and credit unions.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Anthony T. Allred and H. Lon Addams

Bank and credit union customers were surveyed to determine bank and credit union service quality performance. The results of our study indicate that credit unions rate…

Abstract

Bank and credit union customers were surveyed to determine bank and credit union service quality performance. The results of our study indicate that credit unions rate significantly higher than banks on 11 of the 14 service quality questions: access; courtesy; communication; credibility; security; empathy; tangibles; basic service; fairness; fixing mistakes; and guarantees. The findings also indicate that neither banks nor credit unions do a good job of surveying customer needs or retaining customers. Other results indicate that 50 percent of total respondents surveyed reported that they had stopped using a financial service provider because of poor service performance. The vast majority of that group reported that their decision was made because a bank failed to provide adequate service.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1999

Anthony T. Allred and H. Lon Addams

Chief executive officers (CEOs) at America’s top 100 commercial banks, savings institutions and credit unions were surveyed to determine the importance of cost containment…

Abstract

Chief executive officers (CEOs) at America’s top 100 commercial banks, savings institutions and credit unions were surveyed to determine the importance of cost containment and customer retention practices. The study explores differences that exist among the three types of financial institutions. The results of the survey indicate that commercial bank CEOs rate themselves higher than others in almost all areas of cost containment and customer service. Commercial bank and credit union CEOs gave highest priority to customer retention items. Principles for improving service quality and customer retention are discussed in detail.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2012

Erhard K. Valentin and Anthony T. Allred

The reported study was designed to provide insight into gift cards as gifts and their place among gifts of cash and goods. It also was designed to identify promising…

Abstract

Purpose

The reported study was designed to provide insight into gift cards as gifts and their place among gifts of cash and goods. It also was designed to identify promising avenues for further research.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using a structured questionnaire administered to a convenience sample of 317 respondents of both sexes who varied greatly in age.

Findings

Effective liquidity served largely as the basis for categorizing gift cards. The greater a card's effective liquidity, the more its economic impact on the recipient resembles that of cash. The results indicated the following: face value affects recipient preference for effective liquidity; the giver‐getter relationship affects recipient preference for effective liquidity; the gift cards givers give tend to have less effective liquidity than those they prefer to get; some gift cards are more appropriate gifts than others and some, but not all, gift cards are more appropriate gifts than cash; and people feel less guilt when paying for personal luxuries with gift cards than with cash.

Research limitations

The study was largely exploratory insofar as its breadth greatly exceeded its depth and findings derived from a convenience sample.

Originality/value

The study introduced effective liquidity as a basis for assessing similarities and differences between gift cards and gifts of cash and goods. Findings enhance scholarly understanding of gift cards and their place among gifts of cash and goods. Moreover, they afford insights into marketing gift cards and into promising paths for further research.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Case study
Publication date: 12 November 2018

Anthony Allred, Skyler King and Clinton Amos

VoiceStream was a strong brand within the digital wireless communications industry at the time CEO Robert Dodson led the company. It had a loyal following of customers and…

Abstract

Synopsis

VoiceStream was a strong brand within the digital wireless communications industry at the time CEO Robert Dodson led the company. It had a loyal following of customers and a strong reputation for value. Despite pushback from senior management, CEO Robert Dotson made the decision to undergo a rebranding strategy during a period of declining revenue and growth. As VoiceStream transitioned to T-Mobile, it had initial success, but faced the challenge of how to position the brand long term.

Research methodology

This case study was written with the historical background of a well-known company and traces key decisions made during the company’s rebranding transition. This case comes complete with insights from then current CEO, Robert Dotson.

Relevant courses and levels

This case is suitable for undergraduate and graduate courses in marketing, management or strategy, where students are studying brand management. Additionally, this case will be valuable for courses that include advanced branding strategies such as rebranding. This case could also be used for discussion in positioning and advertising techniques. This case includes, via in-depth interviews, critical strategic insights from CEO Robert Dotson. The case illustrates some of the major opportunities and threats associated with the VoiceStream/T-Mobile rebranding strategy.

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2010

Anthony Allred, E.K. Valentin and Goutam Chakraborty

This study intends to examine effects of price ending and level on preference for a provider of a risky service, LASIK eye surgery, which poses notable health and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study intends to examine effects of price ending and level on preference for a provider of a risky service, LASIK eye surgery, which poses notable health and financial risk. Additionally, the study aims to explore quality concerns thought to intervene between price cues and preference.

Design/methodology/approach

Price was manipulated by showing each of three groups an advertisement offering LASIK surgery at one of three prices: US$299, US$300 or US$600. Subjects were asked how likely they were to choose the featured provider if they were to have LASIK surgery; replies were interpreted as indicating the degree to which the featured provider was preferred to all other potential providers. To facilitate exploring the possibility that pricing affects preference via perceived quality, subjects were asked 16 questions about service quality.

Findings

LASIK provider preference ratings were significantly lower at US$299 than at US$300 and, thus, contradicted much prior research into the effects of 9 and 0 price endings. Supplemental analyses implied that, in consonance with prior research, US$299 was seen as much less than US$300. However, cognitive price underestimation attenuated preference because it raised stronger concerns about quality and risk. Exploratory analyses revealed three pertinent quality dimensions: outcome expectations, service process expectations, and customer apprehensions.

Research limitations/implications

Findings are based on a small convenience sample not limited to serious LASIK surgery candidates. The depiction of quality within the risky‐service context was rudimentary and requires refinement.

Practical implications

Purveyors of risky services seem ill‐advised to use prices ending in 9. While 9‐endings tend to stimulate sales of common low‐risk goods, they appear to attenuate sales of risky offerings.

Originality/value

Results shed light on the generalizability of findings from prior psychological pricing research focused on goods and services quite unlike LASIK surgery. They also provide insights into designing more refined inquiries into quality concerns and the effects of pricing on quality concerns, which seem to affect preference.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1983

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This…

Abstract

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This wealth of material poses problems for the researcher in management studies — and, of course, for the librarian: uncovering what has been written in any one area is not an easy task. This volume aims to help the librarian and the researcher overcome some of the immediate problems of identification of material. It is an annotated bibliography of management, drawing on the wide variety of literature produced by MCB University Press. Over the last four years, MCB University Press has produced an extensive range of books and serial publications covering most of the established and many of the developing areas of management. This volume, in conjunction with Volume I, provides a guide to all the material published so far.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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