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Article
Publication date: 22 November 2022

Genevieve d’Ament, Anthony John Saliba and Tahmid Nayeem

The prevalence of visually splendid multi-million-dollar cellar doors (CDs) builds an assumption that bricks and mortar create the co-created cellar door experience (CDE)…

Abstract

Purpose

The prevalence of visually splendid multi-million-dollar cellar doors (CDs) builds an assumption that bricks and mortar create the co-created cellar door experience (CDE). This study aims to determine what attracts the visual attention of staff and customers during a CDE at three visual designs of CD: lively, stylised and simple.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 23 customers and five staff consented to record their CDEs using TobiiPro2 glasses with 35 recordings providing 993 min for analysis with Tobii Pro Lab. Twenty-five areas of interest were used to calculate fixation and visit metrics.

Findings

The most attended elements of a co-created CDE were staff and faces. Attention is less influenced by the design of CD, whereas staff significantly influence attention.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are valuable to the industry as they highlight the importance of human resources to a winery business, an increasingly casualised workforce. Future research could focus on staffing needs, including training and performance during experience delivery, with the expectation of increasing profitability.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to analyse objective recordings of staff and customer visual attention during their experience.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 June 2014

Johan Bruwer, Courtney Buller, Anthony John Saliba and Elton Li

– The purpose of this study was to examine the loyalty of Japanese consumers to country-of-origin (COO) wine brands and how this affects purchasing behaviour.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to examine the loyalty of Japanese consumers to country-of-origin (COO) wine brands and how this affects purchasing behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi-dimensional COO brand loyalty scale was developed containing attitudinal (psychological) and behavioural loyalty dimensions. A total of 173 responses were collected using a structured self-administered questionnaire in the Japanese language.

Findings

Japanese wine consumers have moderate levels of COO brand loyalty, with high levels of satisfaction, moderate-high levels of inertia and price sensitivity and moderate levels of word-of-mouth, emotional attachment, commitment and purchase intent. Furthermore, 46 per cent of respondents exhibited true COO brand loyalty. The conceptual definition of COO wine brand loyalty proved to be sound with a high level of measurement scale reliability (a = 0.884).

Practical implications

The findings provide insights into the Japanese wine market and the nature of Japanese wine consumer behaviour. Wine exporters should focus greater marketing efforts on Japanese women, including more wine-specific education.

Originality/value

It is the first study to develop a multi-dimensional COO wine brand loyalty scale that includes psychological (cognitive, conative and affective attitudinal components) and behavioural loyalty dimensions for the Japanese wine market.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2014

Johan Bruwer, Vladimir Jiranek, Lulie Halstead and Anthony Saliba

The purpose of this paper is to provide clearer insights into and identify the key consumer behaviour metrics of the lower alcohol category (<11 per cent ABV) in the UK…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide clearer insights into and identify the key consumer behaviour metrics of the lower alcohol category (<11 per cent ABV) in the UK wine market.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected via an online survey from a sample size of 598 regular UK wine drinkers. To operationalise the study, five research questions were formulated. A highly structured quantitatively directed questionnaire was designed to find the answers to the research questions.

Findings

Barriers to a larger uptake of the product category included non-availability of the products, lower quality perceptions, taste issues, lack of awareness, lack of alcohol's “feel effect” and absence of a lower alcohol drinking occasion. Many UK consumers are not yet convinced how/if lower alcohol wine fits into their wine drinking occasions. The lower ABV wine buyer's main profile characteristics are weighted towards females, Millennial and Baby Boomer age generations, mostly mid to low income, who drink mainly white and rosé wines. Lower alcohol on its own is not seen as a big benefit, thus lower ABV wines should be more creatively communicated to sell the benefits.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the knowledge base in that it is the first to investigate consumer behaviour metrics as regards lower ABV wine in one of the world's leading markets, in the process providing some important baseline research information on this category. As such it is of value to academic researchers and practitioners alike.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 116 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 22 May 2015

Robert Smith and Gerard McElwee

To explore and document the emerging international market for stolen tractors and plant in the United Kingdom. Whilst this may appear to be a criminological problem…

Abstract

Purpose

To explore and document the emerging international market for stolen tractors and plant in the United Kingdom. Whilst this may appear to be a criminological problem relating specifically to rural crime, it is a sophisticated international criminal business organised by traditional organised crime groups (OCGs) such as the Italian, Polish and Turkish Mafia’s in conjunction with a network of criminal entrepreneurs.

Methodology/approach

Using annual statistical data provided by National Farmers Union (NFU) Mutual and Plant and Agricultural National Intelligence Unit (PANIU) and other material sourced using documentary research techniques supplemented by qualitative interviews with industry specialists we present 10 micro-case studies of rural OCGs engaged in this lucrative enterprise crime. The data is verified and authenticated using narrative inquiry techniques.

Findings

There is an entrepreneurial dimension to the crime because traditional criminal families with knowledge of rural areas and rural social capital form alliances with OCGs. The practical utility of the NFU model of entrepreneurial alliances with interested parties including the police is highlighted.

Research limitations/implications

Implications for research design, ethics and the conduct of such research which are identified and discussed. These include the need to develop an investigative framework to protect academic researchers similar to guidelines in place to protect investigative journalists.

Practical implications

An investigative framework and the adaption of the business model canvass (Osterwalder & Pigneur, 2010) to cover illegal business models are proposed.

Social implications

Suggestions are provided for the need to legislate against international criminal conspiracies.

Originality/value

Uses a mixture of entrepreneurship and criminological theories to help develop an understanding of the problem from an investigative perspective.

Details

Exploring Criminal and Illegal Enterprise: New Perspectives on Research, Policy & Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-551-8

Keywords

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