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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2011

Virginia E. Schein, Anthony J. Marsella, Esther Wiesenfeld, Euclides Sánchez, Mary O'Neill Berry and Walter Reichman

This paper aims to reflect on the work of Virginia E. Schein and her paper “The functions of work‐related group participation for poor women in developing countries: an…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to reflect on the work of Virginia E. Schein and her paper “The functions of work‐related group participation for poor women in developing countries: an exploratory look.”

Design/methodology/approach

Professor Schein traveled to Nicaragua, to lower‐income settings, where she observed and recorded the experiences of women working in self‐organized groups, and used those observations to argue to the profession generally that self‐organized groups of women, however marginal the work itself, can be instrumental in developing the key sense of agency, and self‐efficacy. These are basic capabilities; the stuff of the Millennium Development Goals.

Findings

For this special issue, therefore, the authors have made Schein's 2003 study a focal point. To set the context they asked Dr Schein to reiterate the rationale for the research, and provide a brief overview of the original observations. To help expand the debate on gender, work and poverty reduction, the authors have asked noted colleagues to provide a series of Commentaries on the original article.

Originality/value

Women, especially those raising children alone, are among the poorest of the poor in developing and more developed economies. Research that is applicable and relevant to their work‐related concerns can and should be a larger part of worldwide efforts to reduce poverty. Organizational psychology has much to contribute to those long‐overdue efforts.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2011

Christopher D.B. Burt and Stuart C. Carr

The guest editorial seeks to introduce the papers in this special issue, which focus on the contribution which industrial and organizational psychology can make towards…

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1954

Abstract

Purpose

The guest editorial seeks to introduce the papers in this special issue, which focus on the contribution which industrial and organizational psychology can make towards poverty reduction. It also aims to suggest future research directions.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper begins by offering a broad conceptualization of how industrial and organizational psychology can frame an approach towards poverty reduction. The second part gives a brief outline of each paper in the special issue.

Findings

This special issue brings together studies which generally focus on aspects of the aid worker experience, addressing adjustment issues for international aid workers, relationships between workers, and the value of self‐organizing and social support.

Practical implications

Factors, which could hinder aid workers from achieving their goals, are a common theme across the papers. Variables, which need to be considered, scales, which could be adopted for measuring key issues, and policy issues, which aid organizations need to consider, are discussed.

Originality/value

The paper highlights how industrial and organizational psychology can contribute to poverty reduction.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1996

Rebecca Abraham and Anthony Zikiye

Acculturation profiles based on the self‐oriented, others‐oriented, and perceptual dimensions of acculturative adjustment were derived for MNC employees of American…

Abstract

Acculturation profiles based on the self‐oriented, others‐oriented, and perceptual dimensions of acculturative adjustment were derived for MNC employees of American, Canadian, Indian, Japanese, Latin American, Carribean and Nigerian origin. Our finding of significant, target‐specific, intercultural differences is of paramount importance in delineating areas of predeparture expatriate training and development.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Book part
Publication date: 1 February 2007

Dwight R. Merunka and Robert A. Peterson

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7656-1306-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Philip Crowley

Dealing with the needs of asylum seekers and refugees presents a challenge to local health services, and mental health has been identified as the main health issue for…

Abstract

Dealing with the needs of asylum seekers and refugees presents a challenge to local health services, and mental health has been identified as the main health issue for this group. This paper reports the findings of a quantitative and qualitative study of the mental health care needs of asylum seekers and refugees in Newcastle upon Tyne. Primary and mental health services were found not to be meeting the needs of this group. In some practices, attitudes to asylum seekers among both GPs and other patients were reported as stigmatising. But there is evidence that many of the mental health problems of asylum seekers are related to post‐migration stress arising from practical and economic difficulties and experience of racism and other discrimination, highlighting the need to build support and social connections and include the needs of asylum seekers in local mental health promotion strategies.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2008

Cassandra Seow‐Ling Yee, Setsuo Otsuka, Kieran James and Jenny Kwai‐Sim Leung

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the impact that Japanese culture has on the budgeting process, using insights gained from the literature and from a single company…

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3872

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the impact that Japanese culture has on the budgeting process, using insights gained from the literature and from a single company small‐sample pilot study. It provides a research agenda which links specific aspects of Japanese culture to predictions about Japanese groups' budgetary, performance evaluation and variance investigation practices.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach takes the form of a detailed literature review of the relevant literature in accounting, education and sociology, which considers how Japanese culture systematically differs from Western culture, and a small‐sample pilot study.

Findings

It was found that the Singaporean subsidiary of the Japanese MNC studied uses common Japanese budgeting practices, as previously documented by Ueno and Sekaran. Line managers are rewarded based on overall actual company‐wide profit, consistent with the Japanese collectivist group‐orientation which is itself a product of Confucianism. Although variances are used to rectify operational problems on a timely basis, line managers are not rewarded for outperforming the budget – the budget is a stick, but there is no offsetting carrot. An interviewed line manager (Chinese Singaporean, Purchasing) expressed mixed feelings about the current reward system and a preference for rewards based on outperforming his own budgetary target. This observation is consistent with some research in the educational literature suggesting that the Chinese tend to be less collectivist than the Japanese.

Originality/value

As a literature review the paper provides a synthesis of a diverse variety of sources. The literature review and pilot study findings add to the accounting literature by studying in greater detail than prior studies exactly how and why Japanese culture characteristics will and should affect budgetary practice. The paper should be of special value and interest to higher‐degree and early‐career researchers.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 23 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2021

Mohamed Behery

This study aims to examine the effects of cosmopolitanism on organizational commitment (OC), with a particular focus on the mediating impact of the employees…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the effects of cosmopolitanism on organizational commitment (OC), with a particular focus on the mediating impact of the employees’ challenge-oriented and affiliation-oriented organizational citizenship behaviors within the United Arab Emirates (UAE). The researcher has adopted the theory of planned behavior, the theory of reasoned action and the social exchange theory as a theoretical foundation.

Design/methodology/approach

The quantitative (deductive) method is used. The primary data is collected using a cross-sectional questionnaire. The data collection process was administered across five months. A total of 800 questionnaires were distributed randomly to various business sectors and industries in the UAE. A response rate of 86.9% was achieved, leading to 695 complete and feasible questionnaires.

Findings

Statistical analyzes prove that cosmopolitanism was indeed a valid predictor of OC. Contrary to the expectations, and more specifically, the results revealed that diversity is not a predictor of both challenge-oriented organizational citizenship and OC. The current study indicates that global openness (GOP) is an insignificant predictor of OC. Most remarkably, the present study shows a partially substantial mediation effect of affiliation-oriented organizational citizenship between GOP and OC. Last but not least, challenge-oriented and affiliation-oriented organizational citizenship are significant full mediators between one-world consciousness, cultural acceptance and OC.

Originality/value

Globalization has dramatically increased the diversity of the workforce. This scenario has led to the creation of the concept of Cosmopolitanism. The UAE is a unique setting, given that the workforce in the region is globally diverse. Thus, this study is a unique attempt to bridge the gap between the rich Western theories and the under-researched Non-Western context, namely, the UAE. As each city has its local-rooted environment, one cannot argue that Cosmopolitanism inevitably ignores international orientation. This study explains the embedded factors that constitute Dubai city’s cosmopolitan community, where developments and emerging growing economic trends arise.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Meadhbh Campbell and Charlotte Wilson

The purpose of this paper is to explore mental health service users’ experiences of involvement in a clinical psychology course.

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1464

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore mental health service users’ experiences of involvement in a clinical psychology course.

Design/methodology/approach

Five participants were recruited from a service user and carer group aligned to a university professional clinical psychology course. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews and data were analysed using an interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA).

Findings

Four superordinate themes, group processes, advocating, transforming and power, were drawn from the data, with ten subthemes emerging capturing experiences on the personal, professional and group levels.

Research limitations/implications

The study is not generalisable and has a small number of participants. However, many of the themes have resonance with existing literature.

Practical implications

Service user initiatives need to consider the personal and contextual issues that service users may have experienced prior to their involvement. The needs of service user initiatives may change over time. Such initiatives must evolve in conjunction with the personal and political journeys of participants.

Originality/value

Few studies have explored the experiences of mental health service users in clinical psychology training using a robust methodology. The current study suggests that eliciting these experiences highlights factors that facilitate involvement as well as the barriers.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2021

Nir Kshetri

The purpose of this paper is to examine the use of artificial intelligence (AI) in human resource management (HRM) in the Global South.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the use of artificial intelligence (AI) in human resource management (HRM) in the Global South.

Design/methodology/approach

Multiple case studies of AI tools used in HRM in these countries in recruiting and selecting as well as developing, retaining and productively utilizing employees have been used.

Findings

With AI deployment in HRM, organizations can enhance efficiency in recruitment and selection and gain access to a larger recruitment pool. With AI deployment in HRM, subjective criteria such as nepotism and favoritism are less likely to come into play in recruitment and selection of employees. AI deployment in HRM also has a potentially positive impact on the development, retainment and productive utilization of employees.

Research limitations/implications

AI is an evolving technology. Most HRM apps have not gained enough machine learning capabilities with real-world experience. Some of them lack a scientific basis. AI in HRM thus currently affects only a tiny proportion of the population in the GS.

Practical implications

The paper explores the roles of AI in expanding recruitment pools. It also advances our understanding of how AI-based HIRM tools can help reduce biases in selecting candidates, which is especially important in the Global South. It also delves into various mechanisms by which AI helps in the development, retainment and productive utilization of employees.

Originality/value

We provide details of various mechanisms by which AI brings input and output efficiencies in recruitment and selection in these countries.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 44 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2008

Sohail Inayatullah

The purpose of this paper is to present a new approach to the study of the future.

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9132

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a new approach to the study of the future.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes six foundational concepts (the used future, the disowned future, alternative futures, alignment, models of social change, and uses of the future), six questions (will, fear, missing, alternatives, wish, and next steps as related to the future) and six pillars (mapping, anticipating, timing, deepening, creating alternatives, and transforming), giving examples and case studies where appropriate.

Findings

In an increasingly complex and heterogeneous world, futures studies can help people to recover their agency, and help them to create the world in which they wish to live.

Originality/value

The paper integrates and builds on a variety of futures studies' concepts, ways of thinking and techniques and integrates them into a new approach.

Details

Foresight, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

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