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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2008

Anthony Hesketh

The purpose of this paper is to examine the shared services or outsourcing decision.

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2267

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the shared services or outsourcing decision.

Design/methodology/approach

Data are drawn from interviews with over 70 executives in leading organizations in relation to their strategic objectives in advocating the adoption of their chosen service delivery model.

Findings

The paper notes that decision making by the numbers alone (satellite strategy) may ensure reaching the strategic destination eventually, but perhaps too belatedly. One has to consider the different stages of the “in”, “out” or “shake it all about” debate relating to sourcing strategy and the costs thereof.

Originality/value

The paper is of value in enabling organizations to recognize the distinction between strategic enablement and their competitive intangibles.

Details

Strategic Outsourcing: An International Journal, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8297

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2008

Steve Fleetwood and Anthony Hesketh

The purpose of this paper is to identify the conceptual underpinnings of the theoretical weaknesses of extant research investigating the HRM‐Organizational Performance…

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4045

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the conceptual underpinnings of the theoretical weaknesses of extant research investigating the HRM‐Organizational Performance Link (hereafter HRM‐P Link).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews a number of different empirical approaches to the HRM‐P Link and reflects upon, and defines, theory, focusing upon two important dimensions: prediction and explanation. The paper also discusses why the field in its current guise cannot sustain a commitment to explanation, so that under‐theorisation and lack of explanatory power go hand‐in‐hand. It then tackles the possibility that theoretical underpinnings for empirical research on the HRM‐P Link might come from other disciplines such as economics. The paper also begins to set out a meta‐theoretical alternative.

Findings

The paper finds that: theoretical underpinnings will not emerge and develop simply by doing more, and/or better, empirical work; meta‐theoretical problems besetting the paradigm are actually far worse than is usually recognised; and attempts to borrow theories from other disciplines have not been successful.

Research limitations/implications

The paper shows that this is a broad and complex field and it has been necessarily selective in its evaluation. It does, however, signpost additional writing in this area to complement the word limit it faces here.

Practical implications

The paper shows that both organizations and researchers need to think more robustly about the meta‐theoretical underpinnings of the relationship between HRM practices and their capacity to enable people to perform. It is hoped that renewed meta‐theoretical debate will be triggered in this direction.

Originality/value

This paper is the only critical review of the meta‐theoretical underpinnings of the HRM‐P field.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 March 2010

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241

Abstract

Details

Education + Training, vol. 52 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Robert Kaše, Jaap Paauwe and Saša Batistič

The purpose of this paper is to offer a perspective on the future of the human resource management (HRM)-performance debate and its prospects for interaction with practice…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer a perspective on the future of the human resource management (HRM)-performance debate and its prospects for interaction with practice by evaluating the debate's intellectual structure.

Design/methodology/approach

With co-citation analysis the paper examines the intellectual structure that informed the HRM-performance debate. The findings were presented to a group of academics, who have been influential in the development of the debate. In several rounds of a quasi-Delphi interaction they discussed the state of the art, future development of the debate, upcoming theoretical sources of inspiration and topics on which they (dis)agreed.

Findings

The dominant knowledge domain is built upon resource-based view, social exchange theory, human capital theory, institutional theory and critical perspective. It became well established in the mid 1990s, when the strategic HRM domain merged with the high performance work systems domain, thus forming the conceptual backbone of the debate. More recently the debate has been informed by review studies, meta-analyses and critical reflections on the current methodological paradigms, which is aligned with the debate's life cycle stage.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the theoretical foundations of the HRM-performance debate and gives valuable suggestions on how to take the field forward along with important implications for researchers and their relationship with the business community.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

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189

Abstract

Details

Education + Training, vol. 47 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2007

Richard Holden

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847

Abstract

Details

Education + Training, vol. 49 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2015

Mai Thi Ngoc Dao and Anthony Thorpe

The purpose of this paper is to report the factors that influence Vietnamese students’ choice of university in a little researched context where the effects of…

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2949

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report the factors that influence Vietnamese students’ choice of university in a little researched context where the effects of globalization and education reform are changing higher education.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative survey was completed by 1,124 current or recently completed university students in Vietnam. Marketing approaches are drawn upon to inform the exploration and understanding of student choice and decision making.

Findings

The factor analysed data showed the nine key factors influencing student decisions, in order of significance, as facilities and services, programme, price, offline information, opinions, online information, ways of communication, programme additions, and advertising. There are significant correlations in the Vietnamese context between the factors of price and facilities, and services and programme, and differences between genders and types of students in choosing a university.

Research limitations/implications

Whilst this paper is a starting point, more research is needed in the Vietnamese context with deeper levels of analysis including the differences between types of universities and fields/disciplines, in addition to wider sampling.

Practical implications

A greater understanding of the Vietnamese context helps to inform marketing practices in a country experiencing increasing competition in higher education.

Social implications

Findings from studies in other contexts many not be directly transferrable to Vietnamese universities suggesting the need for a contextual understanding of these factors and a suitably nuanced marketing response.

Originality/value

This paper identifies the need for cultural understanding of little researched contexts and calls for further research which does not assume all cultures and contexts will have the same underlying Vietnamese model of university choice.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Downloads
366

Abstract

Details

Education + Training, vol. 47 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Book part
Publication date: 1 September 2017

Abstract

Details

The Ideological Evolution of Human Resource Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-389-2

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Article
Publication date: 17 July 2007

Anthony M. Grant

The purpose of this paper is to compare the impact of a long‐term (13‐week, spaced learning) with a short‐term (two‐day, block intensive) coaching skills training

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14407

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare the impact of a long‐term (13‐week, spaced learning) with a short‐term (two‐day, block intensive) coaching skills training programme on participants' coaching skills and emotional intelligence.

Design/methodology/approach

In the study 23 participants completed a 13‐week coaching skills training course which consisted of weekly 2.5‐hour workshops and action learning. In comparison, 20 participants completed a two‐day “Manager as Coach” training programme, with a three‐week action learning break between day one and day two. Both training programmes used the same coaching frameworks, with the two‐day programme being more condensed.

Findings

Participation in the 13‐week training course was associated with increases in both goal‐focused coaching skills and emotional intelligence, whereas the two‐day block intensive training was associated with increased goal‐focused coaching skills, but not emotional intelligence. Further, the magnitude of the increase in goal‐focused coaching skills was less for the two‐day programme than for the 13‐week programme.

Research limitations/implications

These studies used a quasi‐experimental pre‐post design, and the long‐term effects were not measured. Future research should use control groups and random assignment to short‐ or long‐term training.

Practical implications

The main implications of these findings are that, while short, intensive programmes may improve participants' goal‐focused coaching skills, organisations seeking to deepen the impact of “Manager as Coach” training programmes and improve the underlying emotional intelligence of participants should use a spaced learning approach over a number of weeks.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine the impact of different approaches to coaching skills training and their impact on emotional intelligence.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

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