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Article

Richard Burchell and Anthony Gilden

This paper aims to show how western project managers operating in Asia can employ a survey based on cultural dimensions and continua as a means to assist with managing a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to show how western project managers operating in Asia can employ a survey based on cultural dimensions and continua as a means to assist with managing a team of host national staff.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey based on a model of national cultural dimensions is described.

Findings

The results for this group of project managers suggest some utility for the Kets de Vries model of cultural dimensions as a means for cross‐cultural studies.

Research limitations/implications

The small sample size is a useful means of measuring cultural orientations in cross cultural research.

Originality/value

Previous use of this cultural model in survey form has not been reported and the approach shows promise as a means for improving cross‐cultural understanding.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 46 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Book part

Ron Stevens, Trysha L. Galloway, Ann Willemsen-Dunlap and Anthony M. Avellino

This chapter describes a neurodynamic modeling approach which may be useful for dynamically assessing teamwork in healthcare and military situations. It begins with a…

Abstract

This chapter describes a neurodynamic modeling approach which may be useful for dynamically assessing teamwork in healthcare and military situations. It begins with a description of electroencephalographic (EEG) signal acquisition and the transformation of the physical units of EEG signals into quantities of information. This transformation provides quantitative, dynamic, and generalizable neurodynamic models that are directly comparable across teams, tasks, training protocols, and team experience levels using the same measurement scale, bits of information. These bits of information can be further used to dynamically guide team performance or to provide after-action feedback that is linked to task events and team actions.

These ideas are instantiated and expanded in the second section of the chapter by showing how these data abstractions, compressions, and transformations take advantage of the natural information redundancy in biologic signals to substantially reduce the number of data dimensions, making the incorporation of neurodynamic feedback into Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITSs) achievable.

Details

Building Intelligent Tutoring Systems for Teams
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-474-1

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Article

Jan Oliver Schwarz

The aim of this paper is to highlight the relevance of the inner future of an organization for diagnosing and treating organizational disorders, as it relates to the

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to highlight the relevance of the inner future of an organization for diagnosing and treating organizational disorders, as it relates to the concept of future‐oriented psychotherapy.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper combines the concept of future‐oriented psychotherapy, with the categorization of organizations using the means of psychiatric disorders.

Findings

The paper finds that the importance of an organization's future is underlined by evidence from psychiatry. Time distortions in psychiatric illness can cloud the personal future of an individual and distort the view of the future and thereby disrupt goal‐directed behavior. The claim of future‐oriented psychotherapy is that in order to treat mental disorders, the future needs to be brought under self‐control; this process is futuring. It is suggested that in an organizational context, the Scenario technique or Strategic Issue Management can be applied to treat organizational disorders.

Research limitations/implications

Additional research will be needed to explore the implications of future‐oriented psychotherapy for other disorders, besides those discussed here (depression, schizophrenia, paranoia), and which methodologies beside the Scenario technique and Strategic Issue Management can be applied for future‐oriented psychotherapy for organizations.

Practical implications

The paper suggests that how the future is dealt with in an organization, has implications for diagnosing the mental health of an organization and for treating such disorders in an organization.

Originality/value

This paper fills a gap in the research on organizational disorders by highlighting the relevance of the inner future of an organization.

Details

Foresight, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

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