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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1984

Anthony Clunies Ross

The first thing to be said about this excellent book is that it is written at least as much for laypeople as for professionals. With the exception of an occasional…

Abstract

The first thing to be said about this excellent book is that it is written at least as much for laypeople as for professionals. With the exception of an occasional technical term such as “externality” and inevitable references to Marxian expressions that have special meanings, there is nothing in it that should deter the interested general reader. Alec Nove matches any abstraction with a gallery of lively illustrations, so that his meaning is easily discerned.

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Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1986

Anthony Clunies Ross

Weitzman's book is short, lively, written for non‐economists, and persuasive. Starting with doubts over reported versions of the Weitzman thesis, this reviewer became…

Abstract

Weitzman's book is short, lively, written for non‐economists, and persuasive. Starting with doubts over reported versions of the Weitzman thesis, this reviewer became convinced that its simple message was at least worth serious consideration. Many others have doubtless had thoughts along broadly the same lines as Weitzman. His achievement is to carry such thoughts to a conclusion and to present the argument in vivid and readily comprehensible terms.

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Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1976

ANTHONY CLUNIES ROSS

Unequal Exchange (L'échange inégal) by Arghiri Emmanuel attempts a Marxist treatment of trade between poor and rich countries. Published with it are four appendices in…

Abstract

Unequal Exchange (L'échange inégal) by Arghiri Emmanuel attempts a Marxist treatment of trade between poor and rich countries. Published with it are four appendices in which Charles Bettelheim and Emmanuel debate the issues raised by the main work, and a fifth appendix in which Emmanuel replies to other critics. Emmanuel aims, he says, to address himself “to economists of all tendencies in a common language” (p.323). This aspiration, which is reprehended by Bettelheim (p.349) — either you stand on Marxist ground or you don't — makes the book a particularly interesting one for the non‐Marxist interested in the same range of issues. Though some of the terms used are Marxist or have a peculiarly Marxist meaning, the approach — again to Bettelheim's dismay (p.284) — is through analytical models whose internal logic and empirical realism can be rigorously discussed.

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Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1988

Anthony Clunies Ross

The assignment of targets to instruments in developing countries cannot satisfactorily follow any simple universal rule. Which approach is appropriate is influenced by…

Abstract

The assignment of targets to instruments in developing countries cannot satisfactorily follow any simple universal rule. Which approach is appropriate is influenced by whether the economy is dominated by primary exports, by the importance of the domestic bond market and bank credit, by the extent of existing restriction in foreign exchange and financial markets, by the presence or absence of persistent high inflation, and by the existence or non‐existence of an active international market in the country's currency. Eighteen observations and maxims on stabilisation policy are tentatively drawn (pp. 64–8) from the material reviewed, and the maxims are partly summarised (pp. 69–71) in a schematic assignment, with variations, of targets to instruments.

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Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Anthony Clunies Ross

Curbing (without banning) potentially environmentally‐damaging activities that have global, rather than local, effects raises challenges analogous to those faced by a…

Abstract

Curbing (without banning) potentially environmentally‐damaging activities that have global, rather than local, effects raises challenges analogous to those faced by a community lacking legislative powers that has to restrict access to a common pasture in order to make its use sustainable. A local community achieves autonomy in a matter such as this by consensual cooperation. In the absence of a world coercive authority, global environmental problems (in which a measure of world autonomy is needed) have to be met similarly by consensual co‐operation among governments. The conditions under which local consensual cooperation have been observed to be successful may also be relevant to global consensual cooperation. In particular there must be clear rules, and devices for interpreting them; they must be acceptable to all parties; and monitoring of compliance is crucial. Even in such cases of quasi‐voluntary compliance, graduated sanctions for infringement, or analogous arrangements, are quite likely to play a vital part. In an international regime for reducing greenhouse‐gas emissions, it is essential that rules should be devised that will appeal as fair and practically tolerable to opinion in both rich and poor countries and to both high and low per capita emitters. This will rule out a regime of uniform percentage reductions without balancing compensation. It will also rule out a regime based on equal per capita claims to engage in the restricted activity. It is desirable that the rules also act to make the allocation of the reductions in the potentially damaging activity efficient. This will favour rules under which financial signals reflecting marginal costs or benefits play some part in the allocation of any target aggregates. It will probably be essential, given prevalent views of justice and differing valuations of environmental goals between rich and poor nations, that the arrangements involve transfers of resources from richer, higher‐per‐capita polluting countries to poorer, lower per capita polluting countries. Nevertheless, reducing emissions sufficiently through a system of tradable quotas summing to the targeted total of emissions – which might seem to meet both this requirement and the need for efficient marginal incentives – has, in its simple form in which the quotas issued are proportional to countries’ populations, little chance of being acceptable to rich, high‐emitter nations. An attempt is made to explore solutions to these dilemmas, leading on from the arrangements made under the Kyoto protocol of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change.

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Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 27 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1985

The librarian and researcher have to be able to uncover specific articles in their areas of interest. This Bibliography is designed to help. Volume IV, like Volume III…

Abstract

The librarian and researcher have to be able to uncover specific articles in their areas of interest. This Bibliography is designed to help. Volume IV, like Volume III, contains features to help the reader to retrieve relevant literature from MCB University Press' considerable output. Each entry within has been indexed according to author(s) and the Fifth Edition of the SCIMP/SCAMP Thesaurus. The latter thus provides a full subject index to facilitate rapid retrieval. Each article or book is assigned its own unique number and this is used in both the subject and author index. This Volume indexes 29 journals indicating the depth, coverage and expansion of MCB's portfolio.

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Management Decision, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1982

Dennis R. Appleyard and Alfred J. Field

This article examines the impact of the US Offshore Assembly Provisions (OAP) on the effective tariff rates of the United States. The effects of OAP are incorporated…

Abstract

This article examines the impact of the US Offshore Assembly Provisions (OAP) on the effective tariff rates of the United States. The effects of OAP are incorporated theoretically into the effective rate calculation and the resulting algorithm is then applied to the 245 affected categories in 1974. The results indicate that, with the presence of OAP, ordinary effective rate calculations overstate the protection afforded to value added in US industries. Although the OAP effect was small, greater usage of the available concessions by importers could alter considerably the level and relative industry impact of the US tariff.

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Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1977

RICHARD E. BERNSTIEN and ROBERT H. DEANS

In the land reform literature an important issue has been the effect land redistribution has on the allocation of resources and agricultural productivity. Generally…

Abstract

In the land reform literature an important issue has been the effect land redistribution has on the allocation of resources and agricultural productivity. Generally, monopolistic behaviour of plantation owners with respect to land has prevailed since control of the land has generated monopsonistic power with respect to labour. This behaviour would result in a lesser degree of land utilization by large land owners and a lower value of marginal product for labour on small farms than on large farms. The rural labour force is effectively left with no options for employment other than the plantation sector. The monopolization of land causes a higher land/labour ratio for large operations than for small farmers. In a competitive market with tillable land held constant, the value of marginal product for labour for the two farm classes would be equal. Further, monopsony theory reveals that output and employment would be lower than in a competitive market.

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Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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