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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2010

Brian Leavy and John Sterling

The current downturn may offer a unique opportunity for astute corporate leadership to undertake the kind of innovation that disrupts markets, channels or even industries

Abstract

Purpose

The current downturn may offer a unique opportunity for astute corporate leadership to undertake the kind of innovation that disrupts markets, channels or even industries says Scott Anthony, president of innovation consultancy Innosight, co‐founded by disruptive innovation guru, Clayton Christensen. This paper aims to investigate this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

In this interview, Anthony reviews how the tenets of disruptive innovation – identify the job the customer cannot get done, look for innovative ways to get that job done, focus on experimentation and learning – apply in a recessionary environment.

Findings

Anthony warns that in recessions, a company may think has a choice – risk innovation or choose the safety of survival mode. But it is a false choice. The only way to survive is to innovate.

Practical implications

Anthony explains that “Scarcity is a great innovation enabler. Lean teams have to focus on the most critical issues.”

Originality/value

Anthony's golden rule: “The best way to develop disruptive capabilities is to start small and learn as you go.”

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2009

Anthony J. Hall and Anthony Clayton

The purpose of this paper is to explore the views of industrial practitioners from Jamaica's hotel, travel and tourism industry on climate change.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the views of industrial practitioners from Jamaica's hotel, travel and tourism industry on climate change.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses standard questions to explore the likely impact of climate change on tourism and the kinds of action needed by government and by industry to mitigate these impacts.

Findings

It is indicated that practitioners are aware of the growing impact of climate change on their business and the need for a co‐ordinated response.

Originality/value

The paper relates the analysis of climate issues in the Caribbean to the views and experiences of industry leaders.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Content available
Article
Publication date: 27 January 2012

Anthony Clayton and Ian Boxill

Abstract

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2012

Anthony Clayton, K'adamwe K'nIfe and Andrew Spencer

The purpose of this paper is to report on the application of integrated assessment (IA) methods to examine the impact of policy changes on Jamaica's sugar industry; also…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on the application of integrated assessment (IA) methods to examine the impact of policy changes on Jamaica's sugar industry; also the potential implications for the economy, employment, society, environment and biodiversity.

Design/methodology/approach

The project applied the integrated assessment (IA) methodology described in the United Nations Environment Programme UNEP‐WCMC/ETB 2009 document “Biodiversity in Integrated Assessment of Trade Policies in the Agriculture Sector”.

Findings

Jamaica's sugar industry has survived because of European Union subsidies, which are now being phased out. The Government therefore decided to divest the industry and refocus it on ethanol production to reduce oil imports. The plan failed, because it depended on factors which were not under the Government's control; specifically, external trade regimes and tariffs. The application of IA identified several possible future scenarios for the industry and developed a solution that would achieve a range of goals, moving away from extensive, low‐value forms of agriculture to intensive, high‐value forms, increasing revenue, profits and skill transfer, while simultaneously reducing environmental impact.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation is the specific focus on one traditional, uncompetitive industry, so results have to be generalized with caution to other sectors with different characteristics.

Originality/value

This paper draws on a much longer technical report titled “The Sugar Industry in Jamaica” written by Anthony Clayton, K’adamwe K’nIfe and Andrew Spencer for the United Nations Environment Programme, Division of Technology, Industry, and Economics, Economics and Trade Branch in 2009. This paper focuses on the main conclusions with regard to the use of IA, and updates the findings, demonstrates the utility of IA methods and shows how Governments can use IA to avoid serious, costly policy failures, and increase the chances of successful outcomes.

Details

World Journal of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 8 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5961

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 August 2009

Richard Teare

Abstract

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

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Article
Publication date: 14 April 2014

Kwame Emmanuel

Population growth, climate change, shortages of oil and other resources will have dramatic implication on where, when and how tourists travel in the future. This will also…

Abstract

Purpose

Population growth, climate change, shortages of oil and other resources will have dramatic implication on where, when and how tourists travel in the future. This will also reshape the tourism industry for the future. Knowing what will happen in the future has always fascinated mankind from time immemorial. However, forecasting and predictions require not only a systematic approach to development but also an imagination and the ability to think and see beyond the ordinary. As a result, the purpose of this paper is to underscore the projected northward shift in tourism demand due to the global impacts of climate change and the lack of policy attention.

Design/methodology/approach

A rapid assessment of the literature was conducted to explore tourism flows to the Caribbean in a changing climate and recommendations for adaptation.

Findings

Tourism demand from major markets such as Europe and North America may be reduced significantly as tourists travel to other destinations, which are closer to home and have a more favourable climate. Regulation of carbon emissions from long haul flights will also influence demand substitution. Despite this projection, current policies in the Caribbean promote further development of the climate sensitive 3S model without anticipating a possible decrease in demand in the future.

Research limitations/implications

Research implications include a recalibration of tourism policy and diversification of Caribbean tourism and economies.

Originality/value

Recommendations are outlined for a critical issue that is not on the policy agenda.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

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Article
Publication date: 14 April 2014

Anthony H. Clayton, Fritz H. Pinnock and Ibrahim Ajagunna

The purpose of this paper is to critically review the contributions made by the articles in this theme issue with reference to the literature and by examining the linkages…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to critically review the contributions made by the articles in this theme issue with reference to the literature and by examining the linkages between global economic change and the sustainable development efforts of tourism-dependent economies.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews the theme issue ' s contribution to four key questions: What are the implications of global economic transformation for tourism? Where will the tourists come from in future? Where will they go? What are the implications for tourism-dependent economies?

Findings

The paper concludes that success in tourism can only be determined by measuring the long-term benefits to the investors and other stakeholders. As such, tourism businesses cannot be sustained indefinitely unless the government, the investors and other stakeholders are broadly satisfied with the benefits derived.

Research limitations/implications

The paper observes that small, tourism-dependent economies need good governance, shrewd management and, in some cases, the determination to leave behind the failed politics of patronage and corruption that have inflicted so much harm in the past.

Originality/value

This article discusses the practical implications and action points arising in response to the question: How might small developing nations achieve long-term sustainable development in a world where the balance of economic output and influence is shifting so rapidly to the emerging industrial powers?

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 April 2014

Richard Teare, Anthony H. Clayton, Fritz H. Pinnock and Ibrahim Ajagunna

Abstract

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Anthony Clayton

The common failure to give due weight to environmental and social factors creates a risk that that short‐term economic growth objectives may be traded off against…

Abstract

The common failure to give due weight to environmental and social factors creates a risk that that short‐term economic growth objectives may be traded off against long‐term objectives, such as environmental quality. This potential policy conflict may be exacerbated in the developing countries that are undergoing structural adjustment, as the associated trimming of non‐core public expenditure will typically include measures designed to manage the environment. Thus the long‐term future of the vital tourist industry might be compromised in the process of meeting short‐term public expenditure reduction targets. The solution lies partly in improved policy coherence; micro‐level prescriptions are more likely to be sustainable per se and also help to underpin a wider process of sustainable development if the appropriate policy framework is analysed and evolved integrally, as part of a coherent national plan. The need, therefore, is for an appropriate, flexible structure that could capture the business, environmental and developmental aspects of tourism.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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