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Abstract

Organizational researchers studying well-being – as well as organizations themselves – often place much of the burden on employees to manage and preserve their own well-being. Missing from this discussion is how – from a human resources management (HRM) perspective – organizations and managers can directly and positively shape the well-being of their employees. The authors use this review to paint a picture of what organizations could be like if they valued people holistically and embraced the full experience of employees’ lives to promote well-being at work. In so doing, the authors tackle five challenges that managers may have to help their employees navigate, but to date have received more limited empirical and theoretical attention from an HRM perspective: (1) recovery at work; (2) women’s health; (3) concealable stigmas; (4) caregiving; and (5) coping with socio-environmental jolts. In each section, the authors highlight how past research has treated managerial or organizational support on these topics, and pave the way for where research needs to advance from an HRM perspective. The authors conclude with ideas for tackling these issues methodologically and analytically, highlighting ways to recruit and support more vulnerable samples that are encapsulated within these topics, as well as analytic approaches to study employee experiences more holistically. In sum, this review represents a call for organizations to now – more than ever – build thriving organizations.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80455-046-5

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 10 June 2015

Anthony C. Klotz and Ryan D. Zimmerman

Although a significant body of work has amassed that explores the antecedents, correlates, and consequences of employee turnover in organizations, little is known about…

Abstract

Although a significant body of work has amassed that explores the antecedents, correlates, and consequences of employee turnover in organizations, little is known about how employees go about quitting once they have made the decision to leave. That is, after the decision to voluntarily quit their job is made, employees must then navigate through the process of planning for their exit, announcing their resignation, and potentially working at their company for weeks after their plans to resign have been made public. Our lack of understanding of the resignation process is important as how employees quit their jobs has the potential to impact the performance and turnover intentions of other organizational members, as well as to harm or benefit the reputation of the organization, overall. Moreover, voluntary turnover is likely to increase in the coming decades. In this chapter, we unpack the resignation process. Specifically, drawing from the communication literature and prior work on employee socialization, we develop a three-stage model of the resignation process that captures the activities and decisions employees face as they quit their jobs, and how individual differences may influence how they behave in each of these three stages. In doing so, we develop a foundation upon which researchers can begin to build a better understanding of what employees go through after they have decided to quit but before they have exited their organization for the final time.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-016-6

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 4 October 2022

Abstract

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80455-046-5

Article
Publication date: 4 January 2013

Anthony C. Klotz and M. Ronald Buckley

The purpose of this paper is to chronicle the study of deviant behavior aimed at the organization, or CWB‐O, from the dawn of the Industrial Revolution to the present day.

4737

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to chronicle the study of deviant behavior aimed at the organization, or CWB‐O, from the dawn of the Industrial Revolution to the present day.

Design/methodology/approach

Counterproductive work behaviors that have been documented and studied since the Industrial Revolution were systematically reviewed and discussed.

Findings

Over the past few centuries, employees have engaged in behaviors that harm their organizations; as organizations have become more complex, however, employees have found many more ways to engage in CWB‐O. Further, recent advances in technology have made employee CWB‐O much more ambiguous.

Research limitations/implications

The study of CWB‐Os will remain a rich area for researchers as the boundaries between work and personal life continue to blur, as employees develop new forms of CWB‐O, and as employers increase their use of technology to detect employee deviance.

Practical implications

As the penetration of technology into job roles grows and the use of personal mobile devices becomes institutionalized, managers now must decide how much company time they will tolerate their employees spending on personal issues while at work. Put another way, managers must cope with the reality that a certain amount of what was once considered deviant behavior in the workplace may now be a minimum expectation of employees.

Originality/value

This paper builds a historical foundation of the present conceptualization of CWB‐O, thereby providing scholars with a greater understanding of what past events drove the emergence of the types of CWB‐O that are prevalent today and why some counterproductive behaviors may have become less prevalent.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 March 2014

Mark C. Bolino, Anthony C. Klotz and Denise Daniels

The purpose of these studies was to investigate how the repeated use of impression management (IM) tactics is related to supervisor perceptions in newly formed…

3829

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of these studies was to investigate how the repeated use of impression management (IM) tactics is related to supervisor perceptions in newly formed supervisor-subordinate dyads.

Design/methodology/approach

Two studies were conducted – a lab study in which participants evaluated a confederate who performed an accounting task while using different types of IM across five trials, and a field study examining the IM tactics of new employees and their supervisors' ratings of likability and performance at two points in time.

Findings

In the lab study, the repeated use of ingratiation had an increasingly positive effect on performance ratings, whereas repeated apologies had an increasingly negative effect on evaluations of performance. The influence of IM tactics on ratings of subordinate likability did not change with repeated use. In the field study, subordinates' use of apologies and justifications was more strongly associated with supervisor evaluations of likability and performance in earlier stages of their relationship.

Practical implications

Employees need to be mindful that IM tactics may vary in their effectiveness depending on the timing and frequency of their use. Furthermore, supervisors should consider the initial influence that IM has on their ability to objectively evaluate new subordinates.

Originality/value

This research is unique in that it examined how the repeated use of both assertive (i.e. ingratiation and self-promotion) and defensive (i.e. apologies and justifications) IM tactics are related to both evaluations of likability and performance ratings at multiple points in time.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 8 June 2011

M. Ronald Buckley, Maria Riaz Hamdani, Anthony C. Klotz and Sorin Valcea

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to establish some of the reasons why there exists a chasm between micro and macro disciplines of organizational sciences. We aim…

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to establish some of the reasons why there exists a chasm between micro and macro disciplines of organizational sciences. We aim to suggest some fecund areas for bridging the gap between the micro and macro side of our science.

Methodology/Approach – In this chapter, we have polled our colleagues to ascertain the areas that they believe have the most potential to bridge the micro–macro divide. In addition, we have reviewed extant literature to identify some of the areas where bridging work has already started.

Findings – Through our survey and literature review, we have identified a number of areas which can help in narrowing the micro–macro divide.

Social Implications – By suggesting some ways to bridge the micro–macro divide, this chapter helps in setting future research agenda that will help in viewing organizational problems from multiple lenses. Our work also encourages the scholars from various disciplines to explore ways that can integrate the broad disciplines of organizational sciences.

Originality/Value of Paper – We have attempted to take the pulse of researchers in management disciplines concerning the chasm between micro and macro disciplines, and we have tried to integrate this information with the bridging research that has already been reported. Moreover, we have suggested a number of reasons why this gap is so difficult to remediate. We discuss how bridging the gap is connected to the way in which we train, develop, and reward nascent scholars in our field.

Details

Building Methodological Bridges
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-026-1

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 8 June 2011

Abstract

Details

Building Methodological Bridges
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-026-1

Book part
Publication date: 10 June 2015

Abstract

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-016-6

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 10 June 2015

Abstract

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-016-6

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 January 2013

Shawn M. Carraher

942

Abstract

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

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