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Article
Publication date: 21 January 2021

Annmarie Nicely, Shweta Singh, Dan Zhu and Soyoung Yoo

The purpose of this study is to ascertain the types of mitigation strategies used around the world to tackle the harassment of visitors by microtraders, the target…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to ascertain the types of mitigation strategies used around the world to tackle the harassment of visitors by microtraders, the target population for these strategies, the number and ratio of countries/territories where used and to posit ideas on how the academy may assist in improving their effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 247 archives from 73 countries/territories were analysed using typological analysis, cross tabulation and frequency analysis.

Findings

Eight broad strategies were found. The top three most common were: policing, media/communication and legislative strategies. In total, 79 specific strategies were also named. The strategies targeted various groups at the destination. This paper then concluded with eight sub-streams for future trader harassment of visitor research being identified. They are research focussing on criminological, learning, research design and data analysis, environmental planning and design, work analysis and design, communication, technological and social infrastructure solutions.

Originality/value

This paper was the first to look at trader harassment mitigation strategies globally and the first to propose sub-streams in the area of visitor harassment research.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Annmarie Nicely and Filza Armadita

The purpose of this study was to, first, determine the demographic predictors of the extent a visitor would feel sympathetic after a visitor harassment (VH) episode and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to, first, determine the demographic predictors of the extent a visitor would feel sympathetic after a visitor harassment (VH) episode and, second, to ascertain whether there were any significant connections between a visitor feeling sympathetic after such an episode and his or her loyalty intentions toward the destination.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey research was conducted. Snowballing was used for the online survey and accidental sampling for the paper survey. The data were analyzed using ordinal logistic regression analyses. A total of 634 surveys were analyzed.

Findings

The following were found. First, sympathy was not a common emotion visitors experienced after being harassed by a trader at a tourist destination. Second, the demographic factors age, gender, income and educational levels were not significant predictors of the extent to which visitors would be sympathetic after a VH episode. Sympathy was a significant predictor of visitors’ intention to recommend the destination and support the traders in the future but not of visitors’ intention to return to the destination.

Research limitations/implications

The study was exploratory, and hence, the findings were preliminary.

Practical implications

The findings could lead to “new” local responses to the problem of VH at tourist destinations.

Originality/Value

The study was the first known to look at visitor sympathy after a VH episode.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 November 2018

Annmarie Nicely and Raslinda Mohd Ghazali

The purpose of this paper is to use a study conducted on the Caribbean island of Jamaica to make the case that music might be a plausible suppressant of negative visitor…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to use a study conducted on the Caribbean island of Jamaica to make the case that music might be a plausible suppressant of negative visitor harassment (VH). The goal of the study in question was to determine the genres of songs and music likely to have a positive effect on emotions the antithesis of the ones associated with VH but would have positive effect on visitors’ shopping behaviors as well.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed method pre-experimental design was used for the study. Forty-two craft traders from a single craft market in Jamaica participated in seven music experiments and the data gathered were analyzed using predominantly paired and independent t-test analyses.

Findings

The researchers found that music likely to result in positive shopper behaviors also resulted in positive trader emotions, in particular in emotions the antithesis of those associated with trader harassment. In addition, the researchers discovered that old non-instrumental local songs had a significantly greater positive effect on these emotions than local contemporary songs and instrumental music.

Originality/value

The study discussed was original as it was the first known that looked at music as a possible treatment for negative VH.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 74 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2012

Annmarie Nicely and Radesh Palakurthi

Sustainable tourism demands a positivistic and holistic look at the true costs and benefits of the industry to host communities. To aid leaders in starting the process…

1600

Abstract

Purpose

Sustainable tourism demands a positivistic and holistic look at the true costs and benefits of the industry to host communities. To aid leaders in starting the process, the article proposes a tourism options navigation model looking at varying number of visitors, their average daily spend and leakages, on the socio‐economic, cultural and environmental landscape of island communities. The article aims to identify various tourism options, their expected effects and potential strategies to mitigating negative outcomes and to later apply the model to the case of the rural parish of St Thomas, Jamaica.

Design/methodology/approach

To achieve the objectives outlined a comprehensive review of related literature was conducted. The researcher interviewed six of Jamaica's national tourism leaders and analyzed their responses.

Findings

It was posited that by employing strategies that impact the number of visitors to the area, their average daily spend and industry‐related economic import leakages, leaders can control the economic, social, cultural and environmental effects of tourism on communities but the process must begin with a clear articulation of the desired effects.

Research limitations/implications

The model could be a useful decision‐making tool for leaders considering tourism as a developmental option or in analyzing the current state of their communities' tourism industry. It could also form the basis for a more objective look at tourism success by researchers.

Originality/value

The model is unique as it provides a single comprehensive look at the causes and effects of tourism and possible ways forward.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Annmarie Nicely, Radesh Palakurthi and A. Denise Gooden

The goal of this study is to identify behaviors linked to hotel managers who report a high degree of work‐related learning. To achieve this the researchers seeks to…

1624

Abstract

Purpose

The goal of this study is to identify behaviors linked to hotel managers who report a high degree of work‐related learning. To achieve this the researchers seeks to determine whether the extent to which managers were intrinsically motivated to learn, their perceived risk‐taking abilities, their attitudes towards learning and their attitudes towards the hospitality industry could determine their level of individual work‐related learning.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was conducted on the island of Jamaica. The survey was completed by 154 hotel managers and multiple regression analyses were used to analyze the data.

Findings

Of the four behaviors examined, two predicted the hotel managers' individual work‐related learning levels, i.e. their perceived risk‐taking abilities, and their attitudes towards learning. Managers who reported high work‐related learning levels also reported high risk‐taking abilities and more positive attitudes towards learning. The extent to which they were intrinsically motivated to learn and their attitudes towards the hospitality industry were not significant determinants of their work‐related learning levels.

Research limitations/implications

The exercise had a number of limitations and these should be taken into consideration when reviewing the findings.

Practical implications

The study therefore pointed to two behaviors linked to intense individual learning amongst managers in hotels. Hotel managers wishing to display high levels of work‐related learning should therefore determine the extent to which they possess the behaviors connected and make the adjustments necessary.

Originality/value

The study was one of a small number which examined objectively individual learning in hospitality business.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Fevzi Okumus

561

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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