Search results

1 – 10 of 20
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 July 2021

Subhan Shahid, Annika Becker and Yasir Mansoor Kundi

This paper aims to untangle the underlying mechanisms through which reputational signals promote stakeholders' intentions to donate in nonprofit organizations via…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to untangle the underlying mechanisms through which reputational signals promote stakeholders' intentions to donate in nonprofit organizations via stakeholder trust.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors apply a moderated mediation model using an experimental design with N = 248 business and public management students of France.

Findings

The results indicate that both a formal reputational signal (third-party certificate) and an informal reputational signal (self-proclaiming to be social entrepreneurial) affect stakeholder trust and intentions to donate. Stakeholder trust partially mediated the relationship between the formal signal and intentions to donate, and the mediation effect was stronger when an informal signal was present (vs. not present).

Practical implications

Trust is central to the exchange of nonprofit organizations and their external stakeholders. To enhance trust and supportive behavior toward nonprofit organizations, these organizations may consider using formal and informal reputational signaling within their marketing strategies.

Originality/value

This research highlights the pivotal role of formal and informal reputational signals for the enhancing stakeholders' trust and donation behavior in a nonprofit context.

Details

Management Decision, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 26 July 2021

Mohammed Aboramadan, Yasir Mansoor Kundi and Annika Becker

Building on the theories of social exchange and organizational support, this study proposes a research model to investigate the impact of green human resources management…

Abstract

Purpose

Building on the theories of social exchange and organizational support, this study proposes a research model to investigate the impact of green human resources management (GHRM) on nonprofit employees' green work-related outcomes, namely green voice behavior, green knowledge-sharing behavior and green helping behavior. In the model, perceived green organizational support (PGOS) is theorized and employed as an intervening mechanism between the examined linkages.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected in two different waves from 408 employees working in the Palestinian nonprofit sector. Covariance based-structural equation modeling was used to validate the study's research model and to examine the hypotheses.

Findings

The results indicated that GHRM is positively associated with green voice behavior, green knowledge-sharing behavior and green helping behavior. Moreover, the results show that PGOS exhibits a significant mediation effect between the aforesaid links. This study thus provides initial empirical evidence in the field of GHRM, with particular focus on the nonprofit sector.

Research limitations/implications

This research provides a roadmap to nonprofit managers and practitioners on how GHRM can encourage employees to speak up, share information and help others in the environmental and green domain. By supporting nonprofit managers strengthening green employee behavior, it provides an additional source to fostering intrinsically motivated behaviors in the workplace.

Originality/value

In response to urgent environmental threats, this study contributes to green and sustainable management research with a focus on GHRM, thereby providing initial empirical research from a nonprofit perspective.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 25 March 2020

Annika Lindberg and Tobias Georg Eule

The article examines situations of unease during ethnographic fieldwork with migration control agents in Sweden, Denmark and Germany. It shows how these “tests” are both…

Abstract

Purpose

The article examines situations of unease during ethnographic fieldwork with migration control agents in Sweden, Denmark and Germany. It shows how these “tests” are both methodologically challenging and analytically valuable, and how they need to be addressed properly. The article concludes a special issue on “passing the test in organisational ethnography”.

Design/methodology/approach

The article is based on ethnographic research with migration control agents, carried out by both authors in Denmark and Sweden (Annika) and Germany (Tobias). However, rather than presenting the main results from this research, the article focuses on the tests encountered during the research.

Findings

The article has two main findings. First, it provides an open typology of tests. Second, it proposes four ways in which ethnographers could address these tests: acknowledging them methodologically, working through them personally and collectively, unpacking them analytically and preparing others in teaching and peer-feedback.

Research limitations/implications

The article encourages ethnographers to engage reflexively with fieldwork challenges, and provides a framework for doing so.

Originality/value

The article presents contributes to the current debate on organisational ethnography with recommendations of how to engage with tests in ethnographic fieldwork.

Details

Journal of Organizational Ethnography, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6749

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

Jürgen Hesselbach, Jan Wrege, Annika Raatz and Oliver Becker

This paper presents a concept for a micro‐assembly station and shows different possibilities for increasing the positioning accuracy. The main part of the station consists…

Abstract

This paper presents a concept for a micro‐assembly station and shows different possibilities for increasing the positioning accuracy. The main part of the station consists of a spatial parallel structure with three translational degrees of freedom. An additional rotational axis is integrated into the working platform. This structure is constructed with low friction joints, which are nearly free of backlash. The construction of these high precision joints is presented and the characteristics of the robot such as workspace and resolution are discussed. After this an approach for increasing the accuracy of parallel robots by integrating flexure hinges into the structure is described.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 June 2020

Annika Lindberg and Tobias Georg Eule

Abstract

Details

Journal of Organizational Ethnography, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6749

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 17 August 2020

Karlijn Massar, Annika Nübold, Robert van Doorn and Karen Schelleman-Offermans

There is an abundance of empirical evidence on the positive effects of employment – and the detrimental effects of unemployment – on individuals’ psychological and…

Abstract

There is an abundance of empirical evidence on the positive effects of employment – and the detrimental effects of unemployment – on individuals’ psychological and physical health and well-being. In this chapter, the authors explore whether and how self-employment or entrepreneurship could be a solution for individuals’ (re)entry to the job market and which (psychological) variables enhance the likelihood of entrepreneurial success. Specifically, the authors first focus on unemployment and its detrimental effects for health and wellbeing, and outline the existing interventions aimed at assisting reemployment and combating the negative consequences of unemployment for individuals’ well-being. Then, the authors will explore entrepreneurship as a potential solution to unemployment and explore the psychological variables that enhance the likelihood of entrepreneurial success. One of the variables the authors highlight as particularly relevant for self-employment is the second-order construct of Psychological Capital (PsyCap; Luthans, Avolio, Avey, & Norman, 2007), as well as its individual components – hope, optimism, efficacy, and resilience. PsyCap is a malleable construct that can be successfully trained, and PsyCap interventions are inherently strength-based and have positive effects on employees’ and entrepreneurs’ performance and wellbeing. Therefore, the authors end the chapter by suggesting that a PsyCap component in existing education and training programs for entrepreneurship is likely to not only increase entrepreneurial intentions and success, but also increases participants’ well-being, self-esteem, and the general confidence they can pick up the reigns and take back control over their (professional) lives.

Details

Entrepreneurial and Small Business Stressors, Experienced Stress, and Well-Being
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-397-8

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 21 October 2019

Tiina Ritvala and Rilana Riikkinen

Social enterprises (SEs) have become important new actors in solving grand challenges in a VUCA world. Nevertheless, International Business (IB) research has paid little…

Abstract

Social enterprises (SEs) have become important new actors in solving grand challenges in a VUCA world. Nevertheless, International Business (IB) research has paid little attention to them. To address this gap, we draw upon a comparative case study of two SEs: one addressing poverty and the other tackling ocean plastics pollution. Our analysis uncovers two issue-specific internationalization paths: a multi-local path and a born-glocal path. On the basis of the findings, we re-conceptualize internationalization in the context of SEs as an ongoing, issue-specific process of social impact scaling through bricolage, global optimization, and local integration. We conclude by offering suggestions for further accounting for SEs in the IB research agenda.

Details

International Business in a VUCA World: The Changing Role of States and Firms
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-256-0

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 November 2020

Anders Örtenblad

Abstract

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 19 December 2017

Karin Klenke

Abstract

Details

Women in Leadership 2nd Edition
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-064-8

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 February 2009

Annika Lantz and Kin Andersson

Learning at work generalises through socialisation into behaviours away from the workplace. The aim of this study is to give empirical evidence of a positive relationship…

Abstract

Purpose

Learning at work generalises through socialisation into behaviours away from the workplace. The aim of this study is to give empirical evidence of a positive relationship between job design, self‐efficacy, competence efficacy and personal initiative at work, and proactive job search while under notice of redundancy and in unemployment.

Design/methodology/approach

The results are based on a detailed work task analysis and self‐reported data by individuals who had been made redundant (n=176).

Findings

The paper finds that the theoretical model received substantial, but not full support. Job design has impact on personal initiative through self‐efficacy and competence‐efficacy as mediating variables between job design and personal initiative. Personal initiative at work affects proactive job search when facing unemployment.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation is that the respondents in general had jobs that were low‐skilled and routine. It is likely that a research group with larger differences in job design would show stronger relations between job design and personal initiative.

Practical implications

Work task analysis identifies conditions at work that minimise and mitigate individual initiative and makes it possible to correct them in order both to enhance organisational effectiveness and the individuals' long‐term employability.

Originality/value

The paper proposes that autonomy and complexity, which are the aspects most predominant in the study of how job design affects personal initiative and self‐efficacy, are too limited. The sequential completeness provides a broader or narrower scope of work tasks and more or less feed back which is crucial for learning and mastery‐experiences. Demand on cooperation, demand on responsibility, cognitive demand and learning opportunities affect initiative‐taking as well.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

1 – 10 of 20