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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2021

Anni Rajala and Annika Tidström

The purpose of this study is to increase understanding about vertical coopetition from the perspective of interrelated conflict episodes on multiple levels.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to increase understanding about vertical coopetition from the perspective of interrelated conflict episodes on multiple levels.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical part is based on a qualitative single case study of a coopetitive buyer-supplier relationship in the manufacturing sector.

Findings

Conflicts in vertical coopetition evolve from being merely functional and task-related to becoming dysfunctional and relationship-related, as the level of competition increases. The nature of conflict episodes influences the development of vertical coopetition, and therefore, the interrelatedness of conflict episodes is important to acknowledge.

Practical implications

Although a conflict is considered functional within a company, it may still be dysfunctional as far as the coopetitive relationship with the buyer or seller is concerned. Competition may trigger conflicts related to protecting own technology and knowledge, which may lead to termination of the cooperation, therefore coopetition should be managed in a way that balance sharing and protecting important knowledge to get advantages of coopetition.

Originality/value

The findings enhance prior research on vertical coopetition by offering new perspectives on causes of conflicts, their management, outcomes and types. The value of taking a multilevel approach lies in the ability to show how conflicts occur and influence other conflicts through the interrelatedness of conflict elements on different levels.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 36 no. 13
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2018

Anni Rajala

Relationship learning is viewed as an important factor in enhancing competitiveness and an important determinant of profitability in relationships. Prior studies have…

Abstract

Purpose

Relationship learning is viewed as an important factor in enhancing competitiveness and an important determinant of profitability in relationships. Prior studies have acknowledged the positive effects of interorganizational learning on performance, but the performance measures applied have varied. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between interorganizational learning and different types of performance. The paper also goes beyond direct effects by investigating the moderating effects of different research designs.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper applies a meta-analytic approach to systematically analyze 21 independent studies (N = 4,618) to reveal the relationship between interorganizational learning and performance.

Findings

The findings indicate that interorganizational learning is an important predictor of performance, and that the effects of interorganizational learning on performance differ in magnitude under different research conditions.

Research limitations/implications

The paper focuses on interorganizational learning, and during the data collection, some related topics were excluded from the data search to retain the focus on learning.

Practical implications

The study evinces the breadth of the field of interorganizational learning and how different research designs affect research results. Moreover, this meta-analysis indicates the need for greater clarity when defining the concepts used in studies and for definitions of the concepts applied in the field of interorganizational learning to be unified.

Originality/value

This study is the first to meta-analytically synthesize literature on interorganizational learning. It also illuminates new perspectives for future studies within this field.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 23 July 2020

Maria Järlström, Tiina Brandt and Anni Rajala

This study aims to advance a holistic and integrated view to understand the relationship between career capital and career success among knowledge workers.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to advance a holistic and integrated view to understand the relationship between career capital and career success among knowledge workers.

Design/methodology/approach

The study examines the associations of three forms of career capital – human, social and psychological capital – on career success. Career success is measured through a subjective evaluation of career satisfaction and an objective evaluation of promotion. The data are drawn from 624 knowledge workers from Finland with an academic degree in business studies. The model is tested through structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results stress the importance of psychological capital as an important career resource among knowledge workers. Therefore, our findings contribute to career research by supporting the argument that context and/or occupational group matters in the relationship between career capital and career success.

Research limitations/implications

The cross-sectional data partly restrict our ability to delimit an impact. Further research using a longitudinal design would be required to confirm longitudinal effects. The respondents were a relatively homogeneous group of knowledge workers, and thus, the results are not generalized to other samples. The Finnish context (e.g., a high-quality education system, welfare society, dual-earner model) may also include special aspects that may have an effect on results limiting generalization to different contexts rather than Nordic ones.

Practical implications

Career capital is an important element of taking charge of one's career, which is expected in current working life scenarios. Given psychological capital has an impact on employees' career success, employees' psychological capital could be supported in organizations to help them to adapt to career changes. Employers benefit from individuals who are willing to invest in their work, and therefore, the employers should be aware of the individual factors that affect employees' career success.

Social implications

The meaning of career success may be context and culture related, as might its predictors. Hence, perceived career success may benefit and spill over to several stakeholders such as employers, family members and friends through its effects of positive energy and well-being. Career counselors could place more emphasis than currently on developing the psychological capital of their clients. The findings are important for other practitioners as well, such as human resource (HR) professionals who might consider dedicated programs fostering psychological capital qualities, which seem to relate to career success among knowledge workers.

Originality/value

A research model that considers career capital as an integrated entity is presented rather than focusing on a single form of career capital. Contextual issues were included by focusing on knowledge workers who represent careerists in a welfare society. These findings could advance career theory and provide developmental guidelines to help employers, HR and career-oriented individuals to build successful careers.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Anni-Kaisa Kähkönen, Katrina Lintukangas, Paavo Ritala and Jukka Hallikas

Due to the increasing complexity in supply chains and networks, several key practices have been highlighted as beneficial for supply chain performance. However, it is less…

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1005

Abstract

Purpose

Due to the increasing complexity in supply chains and networks, several key practices have been highlighted as beneficial for supply chain performance. However, it is less known whether adopting such practices affects the innovation performance of the focal firm. This study hypothesises that supplier collaboration practices in four specific areas (green and ethical supply management, early supplier involvement, systemic purchasing and inter-firm learning) may lead to higher focal firm innovation performance, as they require the firm to adopt new business models, processes and product features.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypotheses drawn from previous research are tested with a quantitative survey study of 165 Finnish firms and analysed by means of regression analysis.

Findings

The results show that two examined practices are positively related to focal firm innovation performance: systemic purchasing and green and ethical supply management. Interestingly, early supplier involvement and inter-firm learning did not influence innovation performance.

Originality/value

Little is known about whether adopting certain practices in supply management affects the innovation performance of the firm. In fact, among the performance indicators of supply management, innovation is rarely studied, and more studies using innovation as a performance indicator are called for. Thus, this study focuses on supplier collaboration practices and their relation to the focal firm’s innovation performance.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2012

Anni‐Kaisa Kähkönen

The study aims to discuss the new value creation logic of value nets and analyze the characteristics of value nets in the context of the food industry. Previous research…

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2049

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to discuss the new value creation logic of value nets and analyze the characteristics of value nets in the context of the food industry. Previous research has shown that along with the growing importance of networking, the value creation logic is also changing from traditional chains to dynamic networks. The objective of this study is to define the characteristics of value nets and to analyze the suitability of the value net as a value creation and business model in the food industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilizes a case research as a method and analyzes a value net from the Finnish food industry. The empirical data comprises 29 individual semi‐structured interviews conducted with the personnel of four case companies.

Findings

The findings of the study suggest that the value net as a business model and value creation model is also suitable for food sector companies. The value net has several characteristics that were found to be significant and useful for food companies. Moreover, food companies can obtain remarkable benefits by utilizing value nets.

Practical implications

The results of the study carry implications for managers and practitioners in terms of shedding light on the value net as a value creation model and business model in the food industry. Managers need to be aware of the developments in value creation logic and recognize that value can no longer be added in a sequential chain, but the perspective should move towards networks in which value is co‐created by the network actors.

Originality/value

Thus far, studies on value nets have concentrated mainly on the ICT sector and there is a limited amount of research on the food industry. The food sector, therefore, offers a new empirical context in which to conduct research on value nets. Food companies are focusing more and more on value creation and networking, and the research of value nets is therefore highly relevant to the business development of the food industry.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 114 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2010

Anni‐Kaisa Kähkönen and Mari Tenkanen

The paper aims to analyze power balance and collaboration in the value net context and to discuss the role of information as a source of power. The purpose is to find out…

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1176

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to analyze power balance and collaboration in the value net context and to discuss the role of information as a source of power. The purpose is to find out how power affects information sharing and collaboration between buyers and suppliers. Both demand and supply perspectives are utilized, and the value net approach is combined with research on supply management and market orientation.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study method was used in order to analyze relationships and information sharing in the Finnish food industry. A 29 semi‐structured interviews were conducted in four case companies.

Findings

The results indicate that value net actors in the supplier role are willing to form collaborative relationships, but when they are in the role of the buyer the willingness to collaborate weakens. The implication is that power increases as the distance from the end‐markets decreases and that power relations affect collaboration and restrict information sharing between the actors in the value net.

Research limitations/implications

A single case study such as this does not purport to produce findings that can be generalized in a statistical sense, but the findings will be valuable in an analytical sense because they extend understanding of the existing theory. Further research should be directed towards comparative studies of value nets, power relations and information sharing in other countries and in other industries.

Practical implications

The paper sheds light on the critical factors that influence value net collaboration, making it possible for managers to focus on relevant issues when developing business relationships and the value net as a whole.

Originality/value

There is a limited amount of research on value nets in the food industry, and because of the changing business environment there is an urgent need for studies focusing on the food business in the context of networks and value nets. In combining the value net approach with purchasing and supply management and market orientation perspectives the study extends the discussion on information sharing with its emphasis on network relations and the complicated nature of collaboration.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 112 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Anni-Kaisa Kähkönen, Katrina Lintukangas and Jukka Hallikas

The purpose of this paper is to examine what kind of supplier relationship management activities can be seen as value-creating activities and how those might affect the…

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2705

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine what kind of supplier relationship management activities can be seen as value-creating activities and how those might affect the buyer’s dependence on its suppliers. Power and dependence provide specific insights into the supplier relationship management and value creation in supply chains.

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilizes a survey data with 165 cases collected in Finland. The concepts are tested by means of regression analysis.

Findings

The findings of the study indicate that the value-creating activities of inter-firm learning and early supplier involvement increase buyer’s dependence, but a supplier orientation does not have similar effects.

Practical implications

The results have implications for supply chain managers and practitioners in terms of shedding light on the approaches of dependence and value creation at the same time. Managers need to understand the factors that create dependence, but which also have a substantial influence on value creation in supply chains and networks.

Originality/value

The literature review reveals that the supply chain situations in which the supplier is strategically important and its role in the value-creation process is significant, and when the buyer is dependent on the supplier, have rarely been discussed. Moreover, by focusing on the supplier relationship management activities that can be seen as value-creating activities and by combining this to the dependence perspective, this study aims to narrow the research gap identified from the previous research.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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