Search results

1 – 10 of over 2000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Philipp Heinemann, Michael Schmidt, Felix Will, Sascha Kaiser, Christoph Jeßberger and Mirko Hornung

The paper aims to assess the potential of aircraft operation from city centres to achieve shortened travel times and the involved aircraft design process.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to assess the potential of aircraft operation from city centres to achieve shortened travel times and the involved aircraft design process.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes the methodical approach and iterative procedure of the design process. An assessment of potential technologies is conducted to provide the required enhancements to fulfil the constraints following an inner-city operation. Operational procedures were analysed to reduce the noise propagation through flight path optimization. Furthermore, a ground-based assisted take-off system was conceived to lower required take-off field length and to prevent engine sizing just for the take-off case. Cabin design optimization for a fast turnaround has been conducted to ensure a wide utilization spectrum. The results prove the feasibility of an aircraft developed for inner city operation.

Findings

A detailed concept for a 60-passenger single aisle aircraft is proposed for an Entry-Into-Service year 2040 with a design range of 1,500 nautical miles for a load factor of 90 per cent. Although the design for Short Take-off and Landing and low noise operation had to be traded partly with cruise efficiency, a noteworthy reduction in fuel burn per passenger and nautical mile could be achieved against current aircraft.

Practical implications

The findings will contribute to the evaluation of the feasibility and impact of the Flightpath 2050 goal of a 4-h door-to-door by providing a feasible but ambitious example. Furthermore, it highlights possible bottlenecks and problems faced when realizing this goal.

Originality/value

The paper draws its value from the consideration of the overall sizing effects at aircraft level and from a holistic view on an inner-city airport/aircraft concept design for a 4-h door-to-door goal.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 89 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1748-8842

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Charles Thorpe and Brynna Jacobson

Drawing upon Alfred Sohn-Rethel's work, we argue that, just as capitalism produces abstract labor, it coproduces both abstract mind and abstract life. Abstract mind is the…

Abstract

Drawing upon Alfred Sohn-Rethel's work, we argue that, just as capitalism produces abstract labor, it coproduces both abstract mind and abstract life. Abstract mind is the split between mind and nature and between subject/observer and observed object that characterizes scientific epistemology. Abstract mind reflects an abstracted objectified world of nature as a means to be exploited. Biological life is rendered as abstract life by capitalist exploitation and by the reification and technologization of organisms by contemporary technoscience. What Alberto Toscano has called “the culture of abstraction” imposes market rationality onto nature and the living world, disrupting biotic communities and transforming organisms into what Finn Bowring calls “functional bio-machines.”

Details

The Capitalist Commodification of Animals
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-681-8

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Mika Veli-Pekka Viljanen

– The purpose of this paper is to aid understanding of the changes in Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (BCBS) regulatory strategies after the global financial crisis.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to aid understanding of the changes in Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (BCBS) regulatory strategies after the global financial crisis.

Design/methodology/approach

The author uses the credit valuation adjustment (CVA) charge reform as a test case for inquiring whether BCBS has departed from its pre-crisis facilitative regulatory strategy path. The regulatory strategy of the CVA charge is discussed.

Findings

The charge exhibits a new regulatory strategy that BCBS has adopted. It seeks to manipulate market structures by imposing risk-insensitive capital charge methodologies.

Originality/value

The paper offers a new heuristic to analyse regulatory initiatives and their significance. The CVA charge has not been subject to a regulatory theory-based analysis in prior literature.

Details

Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 November 2012

Chu Ping Lo

There is great conflict between some developed countries and developing countries regarding attitudes toward reducing global warming (e.g. the USA vs China). The aim of…

Abstract

Purpose

There is great conflict between some developed countries and developing countries regarding attitudes toward reducing global warming (e.g. the USA vs China). The aim of this paper is to argue that open trade doesn't necessarily increase world pollution if clean development mechanism (CDM) is generously undertaken and if the CDM devotes considerable real resources in transfers of the associate abatement technology.

Design/methodology/approach

The impacts of trade on environment can be decomposed into scale, technique and composition effects. This paper incorporates abatement assets into Copeland and Taylor's model to argue that the technique effect stems from an increasing in pollution taxes and in international diffusion of abatement technology; however, the former is fully offset but the latter is facilitated by the CDM.

Findings

While world pollution is jointly determined by the composition and technique effects, in contrast to literature, open trade doesn't necessarily increase world pollution if CDM is generously undertaken with considerable real resources in abatement technology transfers.

Originality/value

Currently, there are more than about one half of the CDM projects that allocate no real resources in technology transfers. This study addresses how voluntary investment of the CDM from the North (e.g. the USA) to the South (e.g. China) might reduce pollution on a global level only if having “generously” technology transfer.

Details

China Agricultural Economic Review, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-137X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1985

Through a survey of 200 employees working in five of the thirty establishments analysed in previous research about the microeconomic effects of reducing the working time…

Abstract

Through a survey of 200 employees working in five of the thirty establishments analysed in previous research about the microeconomic effects of reducing the working time (Cahier 25), the consequences on employees of such a reduction can be assessed; and relevant attitudes and aspirations better known.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Anthea Tinker

The term assistive technology (AT) is relatively new but its origins go back a long way. Some of the elements of assistive technology, such as aids and adaptations, have…

Abstract

The term assistive technology (AT) is relatively new but its origins go back a long way. Some of the elements of assistive technology, such as aids and adaptations, have been a feature of policies for many years. Before the late 1990s it was more usual to focus on the most common types ‐ telephones, alarms, aids and adaptations. More recently telemedicine and smart houses have come to the fore in policies and research. What is confusing now is that a variety of other terms are being used. In this paper the development of these terms in recent policies and the changing terminology are traced. It is suggested that a narrow interpretation can play down the important role of AT in enabling older people to maintain their independence but that it must be seen in conjunction with other services, especially housing.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Peter L. Fitzgerald

The Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act was enacted on 3rd December, 1999, as part of the Intelligence Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2000. The Kingpin Act calls…

Abstract

The Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act was enacted on 3rd December, 1999, as part of the Intelligence Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2000. The Kingpin Act calls for the imposition of a series of US economic and financial sanctions — with a worldwide reach — on ‘foreign narcotics traffickers’, their related ‘organisations’, and those ‘foreign persons’ who support their activities, enforced by penalties ranging up to fines of $10m and imprisonment for ten years. In passing this legislation, Congress specifically looked to the example provided by an earlier set of economic sanctions that prohibited dealings with Colombian narco‐traffickers or entities which they controlled, established by the President under the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (IEEPA) and administered by the Treasury Department's Office of Foreign Assets Controls (OFAC). The controls established by the Kingpin Act, and the associated Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Sanctions Regulations (FNKSR), accordingly, are neither a unique nor an isolated programme. Rather, they represent the latest step in the evolution of a series of distinct, but related, economic sanctions programmes administered by OFAC.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 19 October 2015

Nedra Bahri-Ammari and Khaldoon Nusair

This study aims to show the contribution of the determinants of customer relationship management (CRM), namely, customer-centric organizational culture and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to show the contribution of the determinants of customer relationship management (CRM), namely, customer-centric organizational culture and customer-centric management system, in explaining CRM performance. The moderating role of employee support has also been examined.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was administered to 406 CRM users in 15 four- and five-star hotels in Tunisia. Data were analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results show that a consumer-centric managerial system positively affects CRM technology. Managerial system contributes to have an efficient CRM technology implemented that provides sales force with customer information, competitor information, leads for cross-sell/up-sell opportunities, tracks product availability and measures customer loyalty. These dimensions are negatively affected by a consumer-centric organizational culture. CRM technology once implemented with an adapted consumer-centric vision will enhance the CRM performance. Moreover, the use of CRM technology by employees leads to higher performance. CRM performance can improve when different CRM components are used and supported by employee. Exchange of relevant information that provides technology can improve in regaining lost customers, in acquiring customers and in improving the total return per customer and reducing customer migration.

Practical implications

The findings help managers to consider adopting a customer-oriented CRM strategy that considers all the variables that may affect the performance of this technology (initiation, maintenance and retention). Companies will be able to reconsider some notions related to CRM strategies: restructuring the human factor, disseminating information, changing hotel culture and training of users.

Originality/value

This study is the first to explain CRM performance in Tunisian hotels. It helps to highlight the importance of the visitors’ behavior in hotels, which explains, among other things, the difficulty of maintaining long-lasting relationship with hotel guests, despite a good system management and a good customer-centric culture.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9880

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 November 2019

Sani Damamisau Mohammed

Carbon emissions from gas flaring in the Nigerian oil and gas industry are both a national and international problem. Nigerian government policies to eliminate the problem…

Abstract

Purpose

Carbon emissions from gas flaring in the Nigerian oil and gas industry are both a national and international problem. Nigerian government policies to eliminate the problem 1960-2016 yielded little or no results. The Kyoto Protocol (KP) provides Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) as an international market-based mechanism to reducing global carbon emissions. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to analytically highlight the potentials of CDM in eliminating carbon emissions in the Nigerian oil and gas industry.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviewed the historical background of Kyoto protocol, Nigerian Government policies to eliminating gas flaring in its oil and gas industry 1960-2016 and CDM projects in the industry. The effectiveness of the policies and CDM projects towards ending this problem were descriptively analysed.

Findings

Government policies towards eliminating gas flaring with its attendant carbon emissions appeared not to be yielding the desired results. However, projects registered under CDM in the industry looks effective in ending the problem.

Research limitations/implications

Therefore, the success recorded by CDM projects has the policy implication of encouraging Nigeria to engage on establishing more CDM projects that ostensibly proved effective in reducing CO2 emissions through gas flaring reductions in its oil and gas industry. Apparent effectiveness of studied CDM should provide a way forward for the country in eliminating gas flaring in its oil and gas industry which is also a global menace. Nigeria could achieve this by providing all needed facilitation to realising more CDM investments.

Practical implications

CDM as a policy has proved effective in eliminating gas flaring in the Nigerian oil and gas industry. The government should adopt this international policy to achieve more gas flaring reductions.

Social implications

Social problems of respiratory diseases, water pollution and food shortage among others due to gas flaring are persisting in oil and gas producing areas as government policies failed to end the problem. CDM projects in the industry have proved effective in eliminating the problem, thus improving the social welfare of the people and ensuring sustainable development.

Originality/value

The paper analysed the effectiveness of Nigerian Government policies and an international market-based mechanism towards ending gas flaring in its oil and gas industry.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1988

Riitta Nurminen Anneli Heimbürger and Mervi Lehto

At the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT), an interactive videodisc project was carried out in order to gain experience in videodisc technology and its usefulness…

Abstract

At the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT), an interactive videodisc project was carried out in order to gain experience in videodisc technology and its usefulness for information delivery purposes. The disc ‘Optical data storage and the construction industry’ was produced by the urban planning and building design laboratory. Off‐the‐shelf videodisc products available in Finland were investigated by the Information Service of VTT in order to find the most efficient and versatile Hardwareand software combination. The Information Service also took care of the disc programming. This article looks at the characteristics of optical discs in general and videodiscs in particular. The interactive videodisc system Hardwareand software and the disc production process are described. Guidelines are provided for videodisc designing and production with the needs of libraries and information services in mind.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

1 – 10 of over 2000