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Book part

Katrina M. Hubbard, Annette M. Burris and Ashley L. Gray

This chapter examines the educational perspective of three black, female graduate students within the context of a social justice framework. The US educational system has…

Abstract

This chapter examines the educational perspective of three black, female graduate students within the context of a social justice framework. The US educational system has a long history of racial discrimination, which has created an environment that is in many ways hostile to those who are different. For many students of color, negotiating this culturally hostile environment can lead to feelings of invisibility and isolation. This chapter explores these dynamics and their impact upon an individual’s educational, social, and personal development from the perspective of nondominants in a dominant culture. Through the exploration of our own experiences, we highlight the various coping mechanisms employed by three minority students to deal with the socially constructed hierarchies that exist in the classroom environment as a result of differences across racial and gender lines. It is our hope that this chapter will provide insight to educators who desire to develop a well-balanced classroom experience for all students.

Details

Social Justice Issues and Racism in the College Classroom: Perspectives from Different Voices
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-499-2

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Book part

Patricia G. Boyer

The contributors for this book consist of different voices from students and faculty, by different race/ethnicity, even nationality, as well as feelings and instructions…

Abstract

The contributors for this book consist of different voices from students and faculty, by different race/ethnicity, even nationality, as well as feelings and instructions on various perspective on discussing race in classroom. It is important to have a conversation about race in a “safe setting” to prepare our students for a diverse society and workforce.

Details

Social Justice Issues and Racism in the College Classroom: Perspectives from Different Voices
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-499-2

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Abstract

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Midlife Creativity and Identity: Life into Art
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-333-1

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Abstract

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Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7656-1306-6

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Article

Annette L.M. van den Bosch, Wim J.L. Elving and Menno D.T. de Jong

The purpose of this paper is to develop a research model to investigate corporate visual identity (CVI) management from an organisational perspective. It is assumed that…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a research model to investigate corporate visual identity (CVI) management from an organisational perspective. It is assumed that characteristics of the organisation and of the way a CVI is managed will affect consistency of CVI.

Design/methodology/approach

The model was tested in a survey carried out among employees in 20 Dutch organisations. Structural equation modelling with AMOS was conducted to get insight into the various influences and relationships.

Findings

CVI management characteristics – socialisation processes related to CVI, knowledge of CVI strategy, and CVI tools and support – have a strong impact on the consistency of CVI, and organisational characteristics affect the way CVI is managed. With the exception of the openness and dynamics of an organisation, no supporting evidence was found for a direct relationship between organisational characteristics and CVI consistency.

Research limitations/implications

CVI has been measured by the judgement of the respondents, all employees of the organisation concerned. Therefore the measure was the perceived consistency of CVI. Further research could include a visual audit and the perception of external stakeholders towards the visual identity. There was no distinction examined among the main corporate visual identity and sub‐ or product brands. The study was conducted in the Netherlands, where the Dutch term huisstijl is unambiguous and clearly related to the corporate brand or identity. Future research can take different brands into account or can broaden the concept of CVI (including cultural aspects, language, rituals, myths, etc.).

Practical implications

The results indicate that CVI management matters, that CVI management is related to more general organisational characteristics, but that communication managers nevertheless have a considerable amount of freedom in determining the way they manage their CVI.

Originality/value

Corporate visual identity has received little attention in research and hardly been studied at all from the perspective of this paper. This paper has value to both researchers in the fields of corporate identity and organisational identity, as well as professionals involved in managing the corporate identity.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 40 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Book part

Katherine Brown Rosier and David A. Kinney

This volume of Sociological Studies of Children and Youth showcases the timely and important work of active, early career sociologists, who are helping to define the…

Abstract

This volume of Sociological Studies of Children and Youth showcases the timely and important work of active, early career sociologists, who are helping to define the direction of the sub-field. Their work shares basic premises and concerns, and these underlie and provide cohesion to this diverse collection of chapters. Children and youth are active agents in their own “socialization,” producing meaning and action collaboratively with their peers, and they struggle for agency and control in various social contexts – these are the themes that, both explicitly and implicitly, shape essentially all of the contributions. The underlying concern of our own introduction above, and of many of the chapters, is that the current processes and practices may stifle children's creativity and undermine their potential to collaboratively construct innovative solutions to societal problems.

Details

Sociological Studies of Children and Youth
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-256-6

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Article

Annette M. Mills and Trevor A. Smith

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the impact of specific knowledge management resources (i.e. knowledge management enablers and processes) on organizational performance.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the impact of specific knowledge management resources (i.e. knowledge management enablers and processes) on organizational performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses survey data from 189 managers and structural equation modeling to assess the links between specific knowledge management resources and organizational performance.

Findings

The results show that some knowledge resources (e.g. organizational structure, knowledge application) are directly related to organizational performance, while others (e.g. technology, knowledge conversion), though important preconditions for knowledge management, are not directly related to organizational performance.

Research limitations/implications

The survey findings were based on a single dataset, so the same observations may not apply to other settings. The survey also did not provide in‐depth insight into the key capabilities of individual firms and the circumstances under which some resources are directly related to organizational performance.

Practical implications

The study provides evidence linking particular knowledge resources to organizational performance. Such insights can help firms better target their investments and enhance the success of their knowledge management initiatives.

Originality/value

Prior research often utilizes composite measures when examining the knowledge management‐organizational performance link. This bundling of the dimensions of knowledge management allows managers and researchers to focus on main effects but leaves little room for understanding how particular resources relate to organizational performance. This study addresses this gap by assessing the links between specific knowledge management resources and organizational performance. The results show that some resources are directly related to organizational performance, while others are not.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article

Annette M. Jinks and Ruth Daniels

Addresses the workplace health concerns of employees at an Acute Hospital Trust. The research conducted utilised a focus group methodology to investigate the health…

Abstract

Addresses the workplace health concerns of employees at an Acute Hospital Trust. The research conducted utilised a focus group methodology to investigate the health concerns of multidisciplinary groups of health care workers (n=27). The findings indicate that the concern for the majority was workplace stress. Stressors that were identified as important to the groups were, for example, the nature of the work they were undertaking, staffing levels, volume of the work, management styles and their work environments. Health promotion and prevention topics such as motivation and health status, smoking, alcohol and drug misuse, nutrition and weight control and physical exercise were seen of subsidiary concern. Limitations of the study are given. Future research in the subject area is identified.

Details

Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

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Article

Annette L.M. van den Bosch, Menno D.T. de Jong and Wim J.L. Elving

Corporate visual identity (CVI) comprises all the symbols and graphical elements that express the essence of an organisation. Although it is by far the most visible and…

Abstract

Purpose

Corporate visual identity (CVI) comprises all the symbols and graphical elements that express the essence of an organisation. Although it is by far the most visible and tangible asset in the armoury of tools used by the majority of organisations in their interaction with the outside world, the role of CVI is scarcely mentioned in studies on corporate reputation. Despite the growing interest in measuring reputation and brand values, little is known about the role of CVI. This article aims to explore the relationship between CVI and five general dimensions of reputation: visibility, distinctiveness, authenticity, transparency, and consistency.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper explores the relationship between corporate visual identity and reputation. In which ways and to what extent can CVI support a corporate reputation? This exposition of the relationship between reputation and CVI is based on the framework established by Fombrun and Van Riel and the reputation model they present, which consists of five dimensions: visibility, distinctiveness, authenticity, transparency, and consistency. This relationship is explored by investigating these dimensions.

Findings

It is concluded that CVI can, in principle, support each of these dimensions, through the quality of the design, the range of its application, and the condition of carriers.

Practical implications

CVI must be considered a useful tool that can be successfully applied to managing the reputation of any organization.

Originality/value

The results will be helpful to communication professionals who deal with integrated communication and aim to enhance the consistency of messages – both written and visual – within their organisation.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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Book part

Jeffry M. Netter and Annette B. Poulsen

The 1988 Basel Accord and the proposed revisions to the Accord represent some of the most significant international regulations impacting the financial decisions of firms…

Abstract

The 1988 Basel Accord and the proposed revisions to the Accord represent some of the most significant international regulations impacting the financial decisions of firms, in this case, financial services firms, in recent years. The revisions to the Accord incorporate operational risk into the capital, supervisory and market requirements. In our review of the issues in this area, we provide insight into the workings of an important international regulation. We also present suggestions for further research in this area that will become feasible when data on the impact of the new regulations become available after the proposed implementation in 2006.

Details

Advances in Financial Economics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-214-6

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