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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Annette Lawson

Abstract

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Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Annette Lawson

Human rights figure largely in both rhetoric and practice, and government policy seeks to value and enhance individual equality and quality of life. This paper draws on…

Abstract

Human rights figure largely in both rhetoric and practice, and government policy seeks to value and enhance individual equality and quality of life. This paper draws on recent work, some funded by the Judith Trust, to illustrate gaps in the achievement of these ideals. The proposed new single body, a Commission on Equality and Human Rights (CEHR), may offer an improved framework for implementation of policy goals and more fulfilled lives. The Judith Trust aims to improve the lives of people with both learning disabilities and mental health needs.

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Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2008

Annette Lawson, Renee Francis, Philippa Russell and Janet Veitch

Governments mediate, through their architecture of machinery and policy, access to rights and, by extension, to services. There is limited but growing recognition in both…

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211

Abstract

Governments mediate, through their architecture of machinery and policy, access to rights and, by extension, to services. There is limited but growing recognition in both the UK and other European governments that individuals' power to negotiate this access is limited by the structural inequality of groups in certain named categories of disadvantage (inter alia, people with disabilities), and they are adapting their machinery to provide the support they require to ‘level the playing field’. However, intersectionality (identities which cut across these recognised categories of disadvantage) prevents those affected from using such mechanisms effectively. Those whose disability impairs their mental awareness and understanding face an additional barrier. The paper explores how this limits the rights of those with both learning disabilities and mental illness, and looks at some of the ways in which this problem is being addressed.

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Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-0180

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2009

Laurence Taggart, R McMillan and Annette Lawson

This study examined the personal characteristics and social context of two groups of women with learning disabilities and psychiatric disorders who resided in some form of…

Abstract

This study examined the personal characteristics and social context of two groups of women with learning disabilities and psychiatric disorders who resided in some form of community residential facility. One group of women had been admitted to hospital in the past 12 months (N = 20) and the other had been maintained in the community without any admissions (N = 33). A prospective natural group comparison design was employed over a 12‐month period to study any differences between the groups. Data was collected from the women's key workers using a pro forma and three standardised instruments: Index of Social Competence, Aberrant Behaviour Checklist and the PAS‐ADD Checklist. The groups were matched on age and level of learning disabilities. Differences were found between the groups' behavioural and psychiatric profiles. Anti‐psychotic medication was the first line of treatment. A non‐significant trend was found on negative life experiences, and a binary logistic regression analysis confirmed that high levels of challenging behaviour and having behavioural/mental health management strategies in place predicted hospital admission. The findings of this study are discussed and improvements are explored.

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Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-0180

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Elizabeth Parker

Abstract

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Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Book part
Publication date: 15 October 2013

Susie Balderston

Disabled women are reported to be between twice and five times more likely to experience sexual violence than non-disabled women or disabled men; when these are hate…

Abstract

Background

Disabled women are reported to be between twice and five times more likely to experience sexual violence than non-disabled women or disabled men; when these are hate crimes they compound harms for both victims and communities.

Purpose

This user-led research explores how disabled and Deaf victims and Survivors most effectively resist the harm and injustice they experience after experiencing disablist hate crime involving rape.

Design/methodology/approach

Feminist standpoint methods are employed with reciprocity as central. This small-scale peer research was undertaken with University ethics and supervision over a five year period. Subjects (n=522) consisted of disabled and Deaf victims and Survivors in North of England.

Findings

The intersectional nature of violence against disabled women unsettles constructed macro binaries of public/private space violence and the location of disabled women as inherently vulnerable. Findings demonstrate how seizing collective identity can usefully resist re-victimization, tackle the harms after disablist hate crime involving rape and resist the homogenization of both women and disabled people.

Practical implications

The chapter outlines inequalities in disabled people’s human rights and recommends service and policy improvements, as well as informing methods for conducting ethical research.

Originality/value

This is perhaps the first user-led, social model based feminist standpoint research to explore the collective resistance to harm after experiencing disablist hate crime involving rape. It crossed impairment boundaries and included community living, segregated institutions and women who rely on perpetrators for personal assistance. It offers new evidence of how disabled and Deaf victims and Survivors can collectively unsettle the harms of disablist hate crime and rape and achieve justice and safety on a micro level.

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Gendered Perspectives on Conflict and Violence: Part A
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-110-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Geraldine Holt

Abstract

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Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1995

Anne Brockbank and Joanne Traves

Women in UK retail management are well represented at therecruitment stage and at middle‐management level, but in spite of theprovision of equal opportunities policies…

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1511

Abstract

Women in UK retail management are well represented at the recruitment stage and at middle‐management level, but in spite of the provision of equal opportunities policies, are not well represented at senior levels (the so‐called “glass ceiling” effect). Reports recent research findings about the experience of female managers in the UK retail industry. Researchers sought to explore possible reasons for women′s under‐representation at senior management levels, including: varying emphasis on commitment; equal opportunities practices; and factors influencing career progression. Questionnaires were distributed to a sample of 34 female managers awaiting promotion to the senior position of store/general manager and data yielded significant results. The majority of female managers in the sample were highly committed and ambitious for promotion; criteria for promotion may not always reflect equal opportunities policies; and results suggest that women are disadvantaged by different career planning, a lack of political awareness and support.

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Women in Management Review, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

Pawan Budhwar, Andy Crane, Annette Davies, Rick Delbridge, Tim Edwards, Mahmoud Ezzamel, Lloyd Harris, Emmanuel Ogbonna and Robyn Thomas

Wonders whether companies actually have employees best interests at heart across physical, mental and spiritual spheres. Posits that most organizations ignore their…

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33952

Abstract

Wonders whether companies actually have employees best interests at heart across physical, mental and spiritual spheres. Posits that most organizations ignore their workforce – not even, in many cases, describing workers as assets! Describes many studies to back up this claim in theis work based on the 2002 Employment Research Unit Annual Conference, in Cardiff, Wales.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 25 no. 8/9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 22 July 2021

Christopher Paul Cain, Lisa Nicole Cain, James A. Busser and Hee Jung (Annette) Kang

This study sought to understand how having a calling influenced engagement, work–life balance and career satisfaction for Professional Golfers Association of America (PGA…

Abstract

Purpose

This study sought to understand how having a calling influenced engagement, work–life balance and career satisfaction for Professional Golfers Association of America (PGA) and Golf Course Superintendent of America (GCSA) professionals.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual model was used to examine callings among golf course supervisors and its impact on their engagement, work–life balance and career satisfaction. This study also explored the moderation effect of employees’ generalized or specialized role on the calling–engagement relationship. Surveys were collected from a single golf management company and partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) was used for data analysis.

Findings

The results revealed significant relationships among all of the variables, with the exception of the impact of having a calling on work–life balance. Additionally, the more having a calling increased, the more important it was for supervisors to have specialized roles to increase their engagement.

Originality/value

This study identifies important differences in factors that promote career satisfaction for golf course supervisors and extends current understanding of role theory.

Details

International Hospitality Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-8142

Keywords

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