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Book part
Publication date: 8 November 2017

Mhairi Mackenzie, Annette Hastings, Breannon Babbel, Sarah Simpson and Graham Watt

This chapter addresses inequalities in the United Kingdom through the lens of health inequalities. Driven by inequalities in income and power, health inequalities…

Abstract

This chapter addresses inequalities in the United Kingdom through the lens of health inequalities. Driven by inequalities in income and power, health inequalities represent a microcosm of wider debates on inequalities. They also play a role as the more politically unacceptable face of inequalities – where other types of inequality are more blatantly argued as collateral damage of advanced neoliberalism including ‘inevitable’ austerity measures, politicians are more squeamish about discussing health inequalities in these terms.

The chapter starts by depicting health inequalities in Scotland and summarises health policy analyses of the causes of, and solutions to, health inequalities. It then describes the concept of ‘proportionate’ universalism’ and sets this within the context of debates around universal versus targeted welfare provision in times of fiscal austerity.

It then turns to a small empirical case-study which investigates these tensions within the Scottish National Health Service. The study asks those operating at policy and practice levels: how is proportionate universalism understood; and, is it a threat or ballast to universal welfare provision?

Findings are discussed within the political context of welfare retrenchment, and in terms of meso- and micro-practices. We conclude that there are three levels at which proportionate universalism needs to be critiqued as a means of mitigating the impacts of inequalities in the social determinants of health. These are within the political arenas, at a policy and planning level and at the practice level where individual practitioners are enabled or not to practice in ways that might mitigate existing inequalities.

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Inequalities in the UK
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-479-8

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Book part
Publication date: 8 November 2017

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Inequalities in the UK
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-479-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1993

James Carlopio

Argues that organizational rules have developed over time to servethe needs of both workers and managers. Unfortunately, it is being foundthat rules are double‐edged; they…

Abstract

Argues that organizational rules have developed over time to serve the needs of both workers and managers. Unfortunately, it is being found that rules are double‐edged; they restrict both the rule maker and the potential rule breaker. It is clear that many existing workplace rules do not serve the needs of anyone involved. Discusses several reasons why rules are difficult to change and suggests ways in which to facilitate changes in workplace rules. Concludes that, in order for rules governing existing workplace practices to change, all the relevant stakeholders must expect to gain from their revision.

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International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 13 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Book part
Publication date: 8 November 2017

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Inequalities in the UK
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-479-8

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Book part
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Javier Ruiz-Tagle

In this chapter, I focus on stigmatization exercised and experienced by local residents, comparing two socially-diverse areas in very different contexts: the Cabrini…

Abstract

Purpose

In this chapter, I focus on stigmatization exercised and experienced by local residents, comparing two socially-diverse areas in very different contexts: the Cabrini Green-Near North area in Chicago and the La Loma-La Florida area in Santiago de Chile.

Methodology/approach

Data for this study were drawn from 1 year of qualitative research, using interviews with residents and institutional actors, field notes from observation sessions of several inter-group spaces, and “spatial inventories” in which I located the traces of the symbolic presence of each group.

Findings

Despite contextual differences of type of social differentiation, type of social mix, type of housing tenure for the poor, and public visibility, I argue that there are important common problems: first, symbolic differences are stressed by identity changes; second, distrust against “the other” is spatially crystallized in any type and scale of social housing; third, stigmatization changes in form and scale; and fourth, there are persisting prejudiced depictions and patterns of avoidance.

Social implications

Socially-mixed neighborhoods, as areas where at least two different social groups live in proximity, offer an interesting context for observing territorial stigmatization. They are strange creatures of urban development, due to the powerful symbolism of desegregation in contexts of growing inequalities.

Originality/value

The chapter contributes to a cross-national perspective with a comparison of global-north and global-south cities. And it also springs from a study of socially-mixed areas, in which the debate on concentrated/deconcentrated poverty is central, and in which the problem of “clearing places” appears in both material (e.g., displacement) and symbolic (e.g., stigmatization) terms.

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Article
Publication date: 16 June 2021

Elanor Lucy Webb, Annette Greenwood, Abbey Hamer and Vicky Sibley

Forensic health-care workers are frequently exposed to behaviours that challenge and traumatic material, with notably high levels in developmental disorder (DD) services…

Abstract

Purpose

Forensic health-care workers are frequently exposed to behaviours that challenge and traumatic material, with notably high levels in developmental disorder (DD) services. The provision of support is key in alleviating distress and improving work functioning. This paper aims to incite clarity on whether staff in DD services are more likely to access trauma support. The prevailing needs and outcomes for this population are also explored.

Design/methodology/approach

Data was extracted retrospectively from a database held by an internal trauma support service (TSS) for staff working in a secure psychiatric hospital. Overall, 278 permanent clinical staff accessed the TSS between 2018 and 2020, 102 (36.7%) of whom worked in an adult DD forensic inpatient service.

Findings

Staff working in DD services were over-represented in referrals to the TSS with a greater number of referrals per bed in DD services than in non-DD services (0.94 vs 0.33). DD staff were comparatively more likely to access support for non-physical, psychologically traumatic experiences. Psychological needs and outcomes following support were comparable between staff across services.

Practical implications

The findings highlight the more frequent need for trauma support of staff in forensic inpatient DD settings. Embedding a culture of safety and openness, and establishing appropriate and responsive models of staff support reflect key priorities for inpatient DD health-care providers, for the universal benefit of the organisation, workforce and service users.

Originality/value

This study offers novel insight into levels of access to support for staff working with people with DDs.

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Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

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Book part
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Jerry Toomer, Craig Caldwell, Steve Weitzenkorn and Chelsea Clark

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The Catalyst Effect
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-551-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Georgios I. Zekos

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination…

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Abstract

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination of some legal aspects concerning MNEs, cyberspace and e‐commerce as the means of expression of the digital economy. The whole effort of the author is focused on the examination of various aspects of MNEs and their impact upon globalisation and vice versa and how and if we are moving towards a global digital economy.

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Managerial Law, vol. 45 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2016

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Personnel Review, vol. 45 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1974

Tom Schultheiss

The following classified, annotated list of titles is intended to provide reference librarians with a current checklist of new reference books, and is designed to…

Abstract

The following classified, annotated list of titles is intended to provide reference librarians with a current checklist of new reference books, and is designed to supplement the RSR review column, “Recent Reference Books,” by Frances Neel Cheney. “Reference Books in Print” includes all additional books received prior to the inclusion deadline established for this issue. Appearance in this column does not preclude a later review in RSR. Publishers are urged to send a copy of all new reference books directly to RSR as soon as published, for immediate listing in “Reference Books in Print.” Reference books with imprints older than two years will not be included (with the exception of current reprints or older books newly acquired for distribution by another publisher). The column shall also occasionally include library science or other library related publications of other than a reference character.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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