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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

Pawan Budhwar, Andy Crane, Annette Davies, Rick Delbridge, Tim Edwards, Mahmoud Ezzamel, Lloyd Harris, Emmanuel Ogbonna and Robyn Thomas

Wonders whether companies actually have employees best interests at heart across physical, mental and spiritual spheres. Posits that most organizations ignore their…

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Abstract

Wonders whether companies actually have employees best interests at heart across physical, mental and spiritual spheres. Posits that most organizations ignore their workforce – not even, in many cases, describing workers as assets! Describes many studies to back up this claim in theis work based on the 2002 Employment Research Unit Annual Conference, in Cardiff, Wales.

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Management Research News, vol. 25 no. 8/9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1992

Annette Davies, Ian Kirkpatrick and Nick Oliver

This paper will investigate some of the theoretical and methodological problems associated with the way ‘culture’ is defined and studied in organizational settings. In…

Abstract

This paper will investigate some of the theoretical and methodological problems associated with the way ‘culture’ is defined and studied in organizational settings. In short we raise the fundamental question of how culture is understood and explained, i.e., how does one actually ‘discover’ the culture of an organization? The paper will consider these issues in the context of research conducted by the authors on organizational mergers in which culture is defined as a network of communication rules/norms.

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Management Research News, vol. 15 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2002

Robyn Thomas and Annette Davies

Presents a gendered analysis of the reconstitution of professional subjectivities, as part of the New Public Management (NPM) discourse in the UK police service. Draws on…

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781

Abstract

Presents a gendered analysis of the reconstitution of professional subjectivities, as part of the New Public Management (NPM) discourse in the UK police service. Draws on texts generated from interviews with police uniform and civilian professional/managers in two constabularies. Explores the ways in which individuals have received and responded to the NPM discourse. Analysis of these texts suggests the promotion of specific gendered meanings of commitment, based on high visibility and unquestioning loyalty. Drawing on a Foucauldain feminist framework, illustrates how individuals exploit the weaknesses, contradictions and spaces revealed in the NPM discourse. This takes place through thought and action, stimulated by tension, discomfort, paradox and difference and may result in accomodation, adaptation or denial of the subject positions offered.

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Women in Management Review, vol. 17 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Paula R. Dempsey

This study uses a microanalysis of interaction approach to study how interactive service workers collaborate with one another in conversations to construct their…

Abstract

This study uses a microanalysis of interaction approach to study how interactive service workers collaborate with one another in conversations to construct their professional identity in the face of the rapid contextual change. The data consist of (1) a complex written exchange downloaded from an Internet listserv and (2) a mechanically recorded conversation and detailed transcript showing the exact sequence of turns in the conversation, overlapping utterances, laughter, and speech errors. Everyday descriptions in these conversations reveal how knowledge workers produce and reproduce professional identity and a shared culture in the ways they: (1) categorize themselves and other workers, (2) amend or collaborate on each other's characterizations of clients, and (3) negotiate local policies and rules as they intersect with professional values and emotional boundaries. The results demonstrate a need for opportunities to integrate the increasing complexity of interactive service into professional identity as a response to technological and social change.

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Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1410-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1990

Nick Oliver

Based on case studies collected at two UK factories, the issueswhich arise during JIT implementation are examined. These cases showthat the changes involved in a move…

Abstract

Based on case studies collected at two UK factories, the issues which arise during JIT implementation are examined. These cases show that the changes involved in a move towards JIT have a political dimension. The implication is drawn that, in implementing a JIT system, production managers need to consider the strategic aspects of the change as much as they do the machines and materials aspects. An equally strategic approach to human resource management is indicated.

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International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1990

Nick Oliver

One of the central tenets of total quality control is that responsibility for quality lies at the point of production. Salancik′s model of commitment is used to describe…

Abstract

One of the central tenets of total quality control is that responsibility for quality lies at the point of production. Salancik′s model of commitment is used to describe systems of work organisation which encourage employees to take on this responsibility. Commitment to quality can be fostered by managing the context within which production takes place. Management of the human aspects of total quality control may be informed by relevant ideas from the commitment literature.

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International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Book part
Publication date: 1 February 2007

Dwight R. Merunka and Robert A. Peterson

Abstract

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Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7656-1306-6

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2020

Thorsten Schwetje, Christiane Hauser, Stefan Böschen and Annette Leßmöllmann

The paper reports on a research project exploring the change in the organizational context of communicators and communication units in higher education and research…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper reports on a research project exploring the change in the organizational context of communicators and communication units in higher education and research institutions (HERIs), the importance of informal processes within their daily work and the great diversity of expectations communicators have to tackle.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a literature review, a mixed-methods study combining expert interviews with 54 German HERI heads of communication units, an online-survey and a document analysis of organizational characteristics was conducted. Findings were validated in four focus groups.

Findings

The study illuminates the impact of organizational and operational structures of HERIs on communicators and their boundary spanning activities. Due to varying expectations of stakeholders, communicators constantly have to switch roles. Members of HERIs' executive boards affect status and working conditions for communicators in the organization.

Research limitations/implications

Interviews with other HERI actors, especially members of the executive board, are proposed to get more thorough insights into the organizational context of HERIs and the mutual expectations of different internal stakeholders.

Practical implications

Insights from the project may help HERI actors to reflect their organizational context and to identify potentially contentious structures or processes.

Originality/value

Communicating science sometimes clashes with complex organizational and operational structures. Despite the “organizational turn” in HERI research, there is a lack of data on the relation between communicators, their communication units and the larger organizational context. The exploratory study addresses this gap.

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Journal of Communication Management, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2018

Andrew Kirk, Kevin Armstrong, Niina Nurkka and Annette Jinks

The purpose of this paper is to explore English and Finnish paramedic perceptions of the healthcare blame culture, its relationship to complaints, the use of defensive…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore English and Finnish paramedic perceptions of the healthcare blame culture, its relationship to complaints, the use of defensive practice and if this impacts on paramedic practice and clinical care.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants were recruited from English and Finnish ambulance services that have similar organisational and professional scopes of practice. The aim was to gain insight into the similarities and differences between the countries regarding the existence of a blame culture in paramedic practice. Semi-structured focus groups and interviews involving 20 English and Finnish paramedics were undertaken. Qualitative perceptions concerning the reality of a blame culture in paramedic practice and its impact on professional roles were sought.

Findings

Three major themes that were identified in the thematic analysis included: blame culture and its influences; the impact of complaints against paramedics; and the use of defensive practice within their roles. These data themes were similar for both groups of participants. The majority of participants thought the healthcare blame culture to be widespread and believed that this was likely to directly influence paramedics’ working practices.

Originality/value

Whilst the impact of blame culture and complaints on the medical profession has previously been examined, this study makes an important contribution by exploring the factors that impact on paramedics’ lives and their practice, within two European countries. The inappropriate use of social media by some members of the public in both countries was a disturbing issue for many participants and was identified as an area for further research.

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International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2007

Mark Colman, Amy Hebblethwaite, Annette Hames, Alison Forsyth and Martin Donkin

People who are homeless and have a learning disability tend to be more vulnerable and have greater health needs than homeless people who do not have a learning disability…

Abstract

People who are homeless and have a learning disability tend to be more vulnerable and have greater health needs than homeless people who do not have a learning disability (Leedham, 2002). However, the literature on the experiences of this population is very limited. This paper investigates the experiences and views of professionals from a range of settings who work with people who are homeless and have a learning disability. Semi‐structured interviews were conducted with 23 professionals working for health, social care, probation, employment and voluntary agencies. Professionals described how people who are homeless and have a learning disability have a range of complex personal, health and social needs that are often not met by current accommodation and support provision. Improvements to the quality of temporary accommodation and the on‐site support offered are needed in order to react effectively to episodes of homelessness. In addition, improvements in the quality of outreach support and a greater choice of suitable housing might help to prevent homelessness among this client group. Another paper on a difference aspect of this research (Hebblethwaite et al, this issue) will report on the personal experiences of homeless people with a learning disability.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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