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Book part
Publication date: 9 July 2013

Pamm Kellett and Anne-Marie Hede

This chapter explores how the adoption of Web 2.0 social media platforms as information communications technology (ICT) innovations is impacting organizational design…

Abstract

This chapter explores how the adoption of Web 2.0 social media platforms as information communications technology (ICT) innovations is impacting organizational design, culture, and human resource management (HRM) in events. Individuals responsible for the development and implementation of social media in 12 event organizations were interviewed regarding its adoption and how it impacts work in their organizations. Three types of innovation adopters were identified: spontaneous activists, spontaneous reactors, and organized initiators. The findings demonstrate that the use of social media in event organizations is impacting event workers by creating role overload and ambiguity. This chapter discusses implications for event organizations and their employees in terms of HRM policy, performance management, workforce skill development, recruitment, and retention.

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Tourism Social Media: Transformations in Identity, Community and Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-213-4

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2011

Anne‐Marie Hede and Pamm Kellett

Relatively little is known about marketing communications within the context of special events. The aim of this paper is to begin to address this gap in knowledge by…

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Abstract

Purpose

Relatively little is known about marketing communications within the context of special events. The aim of this paper is to begin to address this gap in knowledge by analysing managerial practice, consumer perceptions and preferences in relation to marketing communications for this market offering.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study analysis of Festival Melbourne 2006 was undertaken using marketing communications collateral, ethnographic (participant observations) and interview (in‐depth and focus group) data.

Findings

A centralised approach to marketing communications was adopted for this event, but was difficult to implement. In addition, it was found that the marketing communications in situ did not assist attendees to make the most of their event experiences. It was also found that research participants prefer to receive information about special events passively.

Practical implications

With the increasing levels of globalisation and standardisation in the event sector there is a need to attain a balance between centralisation and adaptation in relation to marketing communications strategies and their implementation. Furthermore, it is imperative that marketing communications are integrated across all stages of consumption.

Originality/value

This study adds to the body of knowledge about marketing communications, and more generally within events. It also adds to the debate surrounding the integration of marketing communications.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 45 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2014

Anne-Marie Hede, Romana Garma, Alexander Josiassen and Maree Thyne

– This paper aims to investigate the authenticity concept and its antecedents and consequences within the context of museums.

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3407

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the authenticity concept and its antecedents and consequences within the context of museums.

Design/methodology/approach

A higher-order scale of authenticity is developed and then tested for reliability and validity using a sample of museum visitors. To investigate authenticity in a model with two antecedents and two outcomes, an additional data set was collected. Hypotheses were tested using structural equation modelling.

Findings

The results show that perceived authenticity of the museum, the visitor and the materials in the museum are dimensions of perceived authenticity, resonating with Bal’s (1996) research in this area. Findings also confirm that consumer scepticism and expectations are antecedents to perceived authenticity of the visitor experience in museums, and that perceived authenticity in turn affects visitor satisfaction and perceived corporate hypocrisy.

Practical implications

This research provides a framework for museums to manage visitors’ perceptions of authenticity, and to plan and design exhibits accordingly.

Originality/value

Our research, set in the museum context, articulates the basis of perceived authenticity, its antecedents and outcomes. This study sets the foundation for research to further explore how perceived authenticity interacts with other constructs relevant to consumption.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 48 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2009

Tabitha Ramsey White, Anne‐Marie Hede and Ruth Rentschler

The purpose of this paper is to consider whether art experiences can inform service‐dominant logic (SDL) discourse through an exploration of the co‐production and…

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1933

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider whether art experiences can inform service‐dominant logic (SDL) discourse through an exploration of the co‐production and co‐creation processes of art experiences.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical knowledge gained about art experiences is analysed to identify emergent themes about co‐production and co‐creation. Four modes of qualitative data collection are employed: research participant diaries, photo elicitation, in depth interviews and focus groups.

Findings

Key findings are there are three stakeholders involved in the co‐creation of art experiences, which all have critical and different roles; co‐creation and co‐production are both temporally based and evolving and there are points where they interact and intersect; and high levels of engagement in co‐production enhance individuals' contribution to the co‐creation of positive value and make their participation in future co‐production opportunities more likely.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is exploratory and not a general population study. The methodology and sample of participants employed do not allow for the generalisation of the findings to the broader population.

Practical implications

Organisations may benefit from devising strategies to encourage greater dialogue and connection between all stakeholders involved in co‐production and co‐creation. The higher the level of individuals' co‐production of art experiences the greater likelihood of positive value being co‐created. Furthermore, the greater the possibility of individuals engaging in other co‐production experiences in the future. While individuals are attracted to co‐production possibilities, there are factors that are external to an experience that can act as either barriers to or facilitators of co‐production, and that consequently impact on co‐creation.

Originality/value

There is little extant research that explores the applicability of art experiences to SDL. This paper is significant in that it employs empirical research methods to develop knowledge on the topic. Furthermore, this paper is innovative in that it seeks to see whether the art experiences can inform generic marketing models, rather than whether generic marketing models can inform arts marketing.

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Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2009

Noel Dennis, Gretchen Larsen and Michael Macaulay

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Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Book part
Publication date: 22 June 2012

Anne-Marie Hede and John Hall

This chapter focuses on tourism from Australia to Gallipoli to attend Anzac Day commemorations. The research examines diary excerpts of tourists to Gallipoli using theory…

Abstract

This chapter focuses on tourism from Australia to Gallipoli to attend Anzac Day commemorations. The research examines diary excerpts of tourists to Gallipoli using theory on emotions to gain insights into the consumption experience. We describe this tourist experience as a pilgrimage, as it is purposeful and is aimed at reaching a specific destination that has spiritual meaning for the consumer. We found that this tourist experience elicits both positively and negatively valanced emotions. The findings highlight that not all tourism experiences elicit hedonically related emotions; however, the outcome of the experience can be positive. Further research on emotions that explores this paradox between emotions in consumption and emotions in post-consumption will assist to understand the ways in which consumers process their emotions within this context.

Details

Field Guide to Case Study Research in Tourism, Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-742-0

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Book part
Publication date: 22 June 2012

Kenneth F. Hyde

The Field Guide opens with a series of chapters addressing somewhat disparate issues – touristification of the countryside, emotions experienced in a secular pilgrimage…

Abstract

The Field Guide opens with a series of chapters addressing somewhat disparate issues – touristification of the countryside, emotions experienced in a secular pilgrimage, assessment of museum performance, tourists’ packing for travel and the role of the hospitality receptionist. Yet, what these chapters hold in common is their broad approach to case study research. Each chapter presents findings based on the analysis of texts. Here we use the term texts in its broadest sense, to mean the written word, spoken word or visual image intended to express meaning. Thus, amongst these chapters we see research findings generated from the analysis of words and images in tourism promotional materials; analysis of the diaries of tourists; computer software analysis of concepts generated from focus group discussions amongst museum stakeholders; verbal protocol analysis and videotape analysis of a tourist packing for travel; analysis of story, poetry and metaphor used by hospitality reception staff to express their lived experiences of their jobs. Each of the chapters concludes with comment on lessons learned about the processes of data gathering and analysis.

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Field Guide to Case Study Research in Tourism, Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-742-0

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2011

This paper aims to consider the factors contributing to the successful marketing of one‐off special events.

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4298

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to consider the factors contributing to the successful marketing of one‐off special events.

Design/methodology/approach

Uses a case study of Festival Melbourne 2006, a multi‐site, multi‐activity sporting and cultural event, to investigate ways of increasing participation through effective marketing communications.

Findings

Have you ever been invited to something only to discover that it has already happened? That you have missed your chance to take part in something special? That is the marketing challenge facing the organizers and promoters of special events – large‐scale, never‐to‐be‐repeated happenings taking place in several venues: how do you attract prospective participants and get the right sort of information to them at the right time?

Practical implications

Offers guidance on what does and does not work in the marketing of special events and the level of information needed to deliver a memorable experience.

Social implications

Highlights the importance of tailoring marketing materials for local events to the socioeconomic and demographic characteristics of the community audience.

Originality/value

Draws attention to the distinctive challenges of marketing special events.

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Book part
Publication date: 22 June 2012

Maria Amoamo is a post-doctoral fellow in Te Tumu, the School of Māori Pacific and Indigenous Studies at University of Otago in New Zealand. Maria's research interests…

Abstract

Maria Amoamo is a post-doctoral fellow in Te Tumu, the School of Māori Pacific and Indigenous Studies at University of Otago in New Zealand. Maria's research interests include the representation of indigenous, cultural and heritage tourism. Her PhD thesis examined the issue of identity in relation to Māori regional tourism within a post-colonial framework. She is currently examining the economic value of identity in relation to determining ‘what is the profile of Māori tourism in Dunedin?’ Maria is also examining the issue of social vulnerability and resilience of Pacific Island communities in relation to tourism.

Details

Field Guide to Case Study Research in Tourism, Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-742-0

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Book part
Publication date: 22 June 2012

Abstract

Details

Field Guide to Case Study Research in Tourism, Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-742-0

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