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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Anne-Marie Day

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Safer Communities, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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Article
Publication date: 6 April 2021

Anne-Marie Day

The purpose of the paper is to consider the impact on children in custody of the government response to COVID-19 in England and Wales. As the majority of children are held…

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127

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to consider the impact on children in custody of the government response to COVID-19 in England and Wales. As the majority of children are held in young offender institutions, this forms the focus of the piece.

Design/methodology/approach

A review and opinion piece on the government response and the impact of decisions about the juvenile custodial estate on incarcerated children.

Findings

No specific findings as this is an opinion piece.

Originality/value

This paper offers a viewpoint on the government response to COVID-19 and its impact on children in custody. It considers key publications that have cited concerns since the lockdown and seeks to identify key themes emerging from the publications.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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Article
Publication date: 16 June 2021

Anne-Marie Day

This paper aims to explore children’s experiences during their time in custody in England and Wales.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore children’s experiences during their time in custody in England and Wales.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 48 children were interviewed, as part of a wider study on children’s pathways into, through and out of custody. The focus of this paper is on children’s experiences in young offender institutions.

Findings

The findings from this study suggest that children’s behaviour during incarceration can be understood largely as strategies for surviving the hostile environment in which they find themselves.

Practical implications

This paper seeks to make a series of recommendations for practitioner and policymakers, based on the findings of this study.

Originality/value

The findings from this study suggest that children’s behaviour during incarceration can be understood largely as strategies for surviving the hostile environment in which they find themselves. This paper seeks to highlight specific elements of this environment and offers an insight into how they may impact upon a child's sense of self and place in the world.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Anne-Marie Day

The purpose of this paper is to assess the early findings of research which aims to hear the voice of looked after children about their pathways into offending and…

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1765

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the early findings of research which aims to hear the voice of looked after children about their pathways into offending and subsequent entry into the youth justice system, and the implications that this may have for policy and practice.

Design/methodology/approach

One-to-one semi-structured interviews have taken place with 19 looked after children, who are also subject to youth justice supervision. The interviews have been analysed to identify emerging themes, using broadly grounded approaches.

Findings

Three important findings arise from the interviews with the participants. First, children in care are being labelled and removed from the mainstream due to problematic behaviours, rather than searching for the underlying cause of the behaviour. Second, significant anger and frustration is expressed towards residential care staff and the child’s social worker, due to several reasons relating to the institutional environment within residential care, and a lack of trust for those professionals with whom control over the child’s life rests. Finally, the children describe feeling powerless whilst in care, and within this context, the peer group plays a crucial role within the lives of the children interviewed.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are based on the subjective views of 19 interviewees. The sample is not representative, and has not been compared with other forms of data. Rather, it provides the reader with the perspectives of some of the most challenging and vulnerable children in the youth justice system, and places their voice at centre stage.

Practical implications

This paper points to several challenges within current youth justice and social work practice which led to the interviewees feeling disempowered and ambivalent about their future. A number of recommendations for policy and practice are made in the concluding sections of the paper which may assist those in policy and practice.

Originality/value

The voice of the looked after child who is also subject to youth justice has not been given centre stage within research to date. The findings are based on this voice and offer a different perspective about a looked after child’s pathways into offending. A number of potential implications for policy and practice, which could be considered and implemented to deal with this problem, are then discussed.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2009

This paper aims to describe the origins, practical application and outcomes of the Fresh on Service accelerated‐training scheme for employees at UK supermarket chain

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1631

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe the origins, practical application and outcomes of the Fresh on Service accelerated‐training scheme for employees at UK supermarket chain Waitrose, who are known as “partners” because they share ownership of the company.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper details how the training was delivered and presents the views of some of the people who have experienced it.

Findings

The paper reveals that the successful use of non‐management partners to train colleagues in branch on how to deliver great service ensured a high level of buy‐in. The two‐day, out‐of‐branch course was made up of managers and non‐management partners. This meant that both were learning together and therefore fostered further links in their branches. It also encouraged more team‐based communication and problem solving. The allocation of a trainer or facilitator for each branch throughout the training period helped to ensure the credibility of the program and allowed better implementation.

Practical implications

The paper shows that the program raised individual partners' confidence to deliver great service by inspiring, among other things, a “can‐do” attitude.

Originality/value

The paper emphasizes that the program has made a tangible difference to customer service.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Take Care
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-292-3

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2019

Anne-Marie T. Lelkes and Thomas M. Krueger

Prior research has used computer-generated data to illustrate the benefits of the recently developed duration-based costing (DBC) and its affiliate modified duration-based…

Abstract

Purpose

Prior research has used computer-generated data to illustrate the benefits of the recently developed duration-based costing (DBC) and its affiliate modified duration-based costing (MDBC). The purpose of this paper is to use data from a Fortune 500 corporation to compare its traditional, or functional-based, cost allocation method with that of the recently developed DBC and MDBC models.

Design/methodology/approach

A Fortune 500 company provided one month of production data for a particular, key machine within its manufacturing process. The data were used to apply DBC and MDBC.

Findings

Variations arising from differences in the models’ cost allocation reveal the advantages of using time-based cost allocation over the traditional, mostly non-time-based allocation to estimate profit.

Research limitations/implications

By using actual data, this case study enhances prior theoretical research concerning the benefits of utilizing DBC and MDBC over the traditional costing method.

Practical implications

This case study is of benefit to practitioners who use traditional costing since it will encourage them to explore DBC and/or MDBC that tend to be more accurate in situations where the old adage of “time is money” applies. Implementing DBC and MDBC was not difficult to do for the Fortune 500 company as all of the components to run the models were readily available.

Originality/value

This is the first study to utilize actual company data to illustrate DBC and MDBC, and thus, adding to the literature concerning DBC and MDBC.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 46 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Abstract

Details

Police Occupational Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-055-2

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Anne Marie Turvey and Jeremy Lloyd

The purpose of this study is to investigate contemporary pre-service English teacher education in the UK and the transition, for one individual, from pre-service into…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate contemporary pre-service English teacher education in the UK and the transition, for one individual, from pre-service into early-career English teacher. The investigation explores how standards-based education reforms are narrowing the scope of professional practice in UK schools, especially in regard to the creativity of teachers and students.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use critical autobiography (Haug, 1992; Miller, 1995; Rosen, 1998) and dialogic storytelling strategies (Doecke and Parr, 2009; Parr et al., 2015), that are grounded in Bakhtinian (1981) theories of language, education and creativity.

Findings

The essay critically illustrates how standards-based reforms are narrowing the professional practice of English teachers in secondary classrooms in England and compares this with one account of pre-service teacher education in which prospective teachers are taught to appreciate the situated nature of teaching and learning and the power of creative practices to engage students in their learning and development.

Originality/value

The critical and creative use of dialogic storytelling strategies allows the authors to present rigorously contextualised accounts of English teacher education and English teaching in England. The reflexive accounts complement the increasing numbers of studies that are showing the injurious effects of standards-based education reforms on English teaching and learning in schools.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

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Book part
Publication date: 30 July 2007

Megan O’Neill and Anne-Marie Singh

Abstract

Details

Police Occupational Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-055-2

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