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1 – 10 of 21
Article
Publication date: 7 March 2019

Pierre-Jean Barlatier and Anne-Laure Mention

This paper aims to present a framework to guide managerial action for social media (SM) strategies for innovation by exploring its constituent elements – the “what” (SM…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a framework to guide managerial action for social media (SM) strategies for innovation by exploring its constituent elements – the “what” (SM types), the “who” (stakeholders to be reached), the “for” (innovation types) and the “how” (innovation process stages), as well as the value, benefits and barriers.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive and critical review of literature at the intersection of SM and innovation guides the development of a typology of SM types and their use across innovation types and stages.

Findings

SM type and use tend to differ across innovation processes. The authors identify four types of SM in use across four stages of innovation, supporting six types of innovation, influenced by five categories of barriers, benefits and stakeholders each.

Research limitations/implications

The research provides an integrative set of building blocks to consider for developing further studies of SM and innovation.

Practical implications

By highlighting the intertwined aspects of SM and innovation in an open and collaborative environment, the paper calls for development of an SM readiness organisational diagnosis. It empowers managers with a coherent framework of different elements they should take into consideration when defining their SM strategies for innovation.

Originality/value

Research on SM adoption and the extent of its usage for innovation purposes is still at its infancy. Given the increasingly open and collaborative innovation settings, the authors draw managerial attention to the need of SM strategies for innovation activities and provide a coherent analytical framework to guide action for organisational diagnosis.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 41 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 September 2021

Serdal Temel, Anne-Laure Mention and Alp Eren Yurtseven

Embracing a large set of innovation objectives and collaborating with diverse partners have been promoted as a means to improve innovation performance. However, empirical…

Abstract

Purpose

Embracing a large set of innovation objectives and collaborating with diverse partners have been promoted as a means to improve innovation performance. However, empirical evidence on the relationships between breadth of objectives, breadth of cooperation and innovation performance is limited, particularly in the context of emerging economies. A larger number of objectives and cooperation partners inevitably increases the complexity in organizational alignment, and cooperation eventually leads to diminishing returns. This study adds to the debate on the costs and benefits of cooperation for innovation. Understanding the optimal levels of the breadth of objectives and cooperation supports managerial decision-making and productivity in the practice of cooperation for innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

Operationalizing breadth of innovation objectives and cooperation via the Turkish Community Innovation Survey data, self-reports reflecting 5,863 firm-level responses between 2006 and 2008 are analysed using tobit and probit models. The maximum likelihood estimator is used to find the optimal levels for breadth of objectives and cooperation.

Findings

Firms with greater breadth of innovation objectives experience higher innovation performance; those with greater breadth of cooperation also experience higher innovation performance, but our results indicate the existence of optimal levels of breadth for both innovation objectives and cooperation.

Research limitations/implications

The authors extend the logic that there is no safety in numbers in cooperation for innovation. If the aim is to enhance innovation performance, managers and policymakers need to pay attention to the number of innovation objectives and the amount of cooperation pursued by firms. However, innovation success may be closely associated with a firm's dynamic capabilities and ability to mobilize its resources. Drawing on organizational learning theories, future research could explore why a lower than maximum level of cooperation may be more conducive to reaching levels of enhanced innovation performance and whether this level is influenced by cognitive processes.

Originality/value

The authors draw attention to the ideal number of innovation objectives and number of cooperating partners required to enhance innovation performance, thus contributing to the debate on the complex relationships between innovation, performance and cooperation in the unique setting of a large developing economy.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 13 December 2021

Avni Misra and Anne-Laure Mention

This paper reviews the literature, foundational works and current trends related to the adoption of open innovation (OI) practices in the food industry, with a particular…

1213

Abstract

Purpose

This paper reviews the literature, foundational works and current trends related to the adoption of open innovation (OI) practices in the food industry, with a particular focus on the food value chain, using a bibliometric and content analysis approach.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on 84 published documents in the field of food OI obtained using the Scopus database. First, a bibliometric analysis was conducted using a bibliographic coupling and co-citation analysis approach to understand the common themes and key clusters of food OI research. It further highlighted authors, countries, journals, years of publication and subject areas to comprehend the scope of the established literature. Second, a content analysis was undertaken to examine the titles and abstracts of the documents to explore the intersection of OI and the food value chain.

Findings

This study provides an integrated framework of the intersection of OI and the food value chain, including information about under-researched and emerging areas in the field of food innovation. It also highlights the critical challenges associated with OI food research and practices.

Practical implications

Practitioners can use the findings to uncover areas with limited open innovation adoption in the food value chain. They can identify extended research areas to explore the food value chain using an open innovation perspective, in different contexts within the food and beverage (F&B) industry. The framework can also be used for conducting comparative studies of current food innovation trends across different contexts within the F&B industry.

Originality/value

By adopting a multi-step approach involving a computer-assisted bibliometric examination complemented by a manual review undertaken through the lens of the food value chain, this literature review provides fresh and unique insights into past and present research on OI in the food industry and paves the way for future studies by laying out specific research avenues.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 124 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 April 2013

Anne‐Laure Mention and Nick Bontis

Intellectual capital is widely acknowledged as the most critical resource of modern organizations. Nevertheless, empirical evidence on its actual contribution to the…

3159

Abstract

Purpose

Intellectual capital is widely acknowledged as the most critical resource of modern organizations. Nevertheless, empirical evidence on its actual contribution to the dynamics of the value creation process remains scarce, especially within certain sectors and geographic regions. The purpose of this paper is to address this gap by investigating the effects of intellectual capital and its components on business performance in banking institutions within Luxembourg and Belgium.

Design/methodology/approach

This empirical research is conducted using a dedicated survey instrument administered to over 200 banks. Data analysis is achieved through structural equation modeling.

Findings

Results indicate that human capital contributes both directly and indirectly to business performance in the banking sector. Structural and relational capital are positively related to business performance, though results are not statistically significant. Surprisingly, relational capital has been evidenced to negatively moderate the effect of structural capital on performance.

Research limitations/implications

Traditional limitations of a cross‐sectional study apply with respect to the attribution of causality and the time lag effects.

Practical implications

A set of reliable items to capture intellectual capital has been identified and represents actionable knowledge for implementing an intellectual capital dashboard in banks. The dominant role of human capital also provides insight to managers with respect to business performance levers.

Originality/value

Disentangling the effects of intellectual capital on business performance is of the utmost importance in service firms, as they are heavily reliant on intangible resources and capabilities. This research contributes to develop current understanding of these effects. Moreover, interaction effects between human, structural and relational capital have also been uncovered, thus extending prior knowledge on these complex relationships.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 January 2011

Dieter De Smet and Anne‐Laure Mention

The purpose of this paper is to report on the suitability of an ISO standard to create an internal control assessment model, which effectively acts as a control system…

3653

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on the suitability of an ISO standard to create an internal control assessment model, which effectively acts as a control system template and mental model to evaluate compliance with the Know Your Customer (KYC) and anti‐money laundering (AML) requirements in the Luxembourg retail and private banking sector.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper used a qualitative approach with various focus groups and case studies, to elaborate and validate the developed model through methodological triangulation.

Findings

The proposed assessment model has a matrix structure that facilitates the incorporation of checklists and narratives to ensure effective testing of controls and its structure allows targeting specific areas of risk in the identified KYC/AML processes.

Research limitations/implications

The development of the model tended to be time consuming and could explain why matrix formats are used less often and the traditional limitations of a qualitative research apply.

Practical implications

The model can be used to combine various reporting formats on internal control, hence the audit effectiveness can be increased and information asymmetries can be reduced.

Originality/value

The proposed assessment model offers an innovative approach because it combines a process view of the business with an internal control view. Research in internal control assessment models has been very limited in the past years.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2016

Andrey Martovoy and Anne-Laure Mention

– The purpose of this paper is to map the existing patterns in the development of services innovations in financial institutions.

1787

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to map the existing patterns in the development of services innovations in financial institutions.

Design/methodology/approach

The data come from a dedicated survey of banks located in Luxembourg. Executives and innovation managers reported on banks’ innovation processes for the period of 2010-2012.

Findings

The study unveils four patterns of new service development (NSD) processes. The problem-driven pattern starts with problem definition and represents a bank’s response to an issue. The proactivity-driven pattern commences with idea generation to explore a variety of alternatives. The market-driven pattern emphasises a profit rationale and starts with a business analysis. The strategy-driven pattern frames idea generation within the scope of business goals and starts with the development of a service concept. Most banks keep a balance between being open and closed to cooperation with external partners in the innovation process. Service concept development is the stage most open to the cooperation for innovation, while introduction to a market is the opposite.

Research limitations/implications

The national context and small sample size are the limitations of this study. Promising research avenues include the extension of findings to other settings and understanding of the effects of NSD patterns.

Practical implications

Banks adopt different approaches to the innovation process in order to pursue their innovation goals. Practitioners may use this knowledge in order to re-think the way they innovate.

Originality/value

The unveiled mapping of NSD processes contributes to the understanding of the innovation in financial services. The findings will be valuable for innovation managers, scholars, and students.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Abstract

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 124 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Giovanni Mangiarotti and Cesare A.F. Riillo

The research empirically investigates the firm-level impact of ISO 9000 certification on innovation propensity. The study aims to distinguish between manufacturing and…

1464

Abstract

Purpose

The research empirically investigates the firm-level impact of ISO 9000 certification on innovation propensity. The study aims to distinguish between manufacturing and service sectors and adopts different innovation definitions aimed at capturing the peculiarities of innovation in services and small firms.

Design/methodology/approach

Relying chiefly on Community Innovation Survey data for Luxembourg, the impact of certification on innovation probability is assessed using a logit model that controls for relevant firms characteristics and market features.

Findings

The innovation potential of services and small firms is understated when adopting innovation definitions restricted to technological aspects and more formalised innovation activities. ISO 9000 certification may promote innovation when adopting definitions that captures sectoral innovation specificities. In particular, certification increases innovation propensity in manufacturing when the focus is on technological innovation and formalised innovation expenditures. On the contrary, when non-technological aspects are included and allowance is made for wider innovation activities, the impact of certification on services tends to emerge. However, sharper statistical evidence for manufacturing indicates a more important role of certification for innovation success in this sector.

Research limitations/implications

Case-study research could supplement the findings concerning the relative effectiveness of certification in services and manufacturing. The investigation would also benefit from extensions in the econometric analysis to address comparisons across samples and potential causality issues.

Practical implications

Findings are interesting to practitioners and registrars in order to identify the specific characteristics of firms for which certification provides higher innovative potential.

Originality/value

The study highlights the relevance of sectoral specificities and innovation definitions for the debate about the effect of ISO 9000 certification on innovation.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 June 2021

María Isabel Roldán Bravo, Antonia Ruiz Moreno, Alejandro Garcia Garcia and Irene Huertas-Valdivia

This paper aims to investigate whether and under what conditions open innovation (OI) drives innovation performance (IP) in the financial sector. To this end, the paper…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate whether and under what conditions open innovation (OI) drives innovation performance (IP) in the financial sector. To this end, the paper first analyzes in-depth the indirect effect of overcoming two attitudinal mediators, namely, not-invented-here syndrome (NIHS) and not-sold-here syndrome (NSHS). It then uses dynamic capabilities theory to hypothesize that the indirect effects are moderated by absorptive and desorptive capabilities, respectively.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors perform an empirical study of major Spanish financial entities. Data are collected from 288 questionnaires from employees at branches of 13 bank entities. Regression analysis tests the mediating role of overcoming syndromes and the moderated-mediating role of dynamic capabilities in the OI–IP relationship.

Findings

Results confirm the indirect effect of overcoming NIHS on the relationship between outside-in OI and IP, and the indirect effect of overcoming NSHS on the relationship between inside-out OI and IP. Further, absorptive capacity moderates the indirect effect between outside-in OI practices and IP by overcoming NIHS, and desorptive capacity moderates the indirect effect between inside-out OI practices and IP by overcoming NSHS.

Originality/value

This paper advances knowledge by explaining discrepancies in the sign of the OI–IP relationship. By introducing comprehensive absorptive and desorptive capacity models to explain OI, it advocates an integrative framework to understand OI activities and their outcomes. Managers should develop these capacities using human talent training and cultural values development to mitigate NIHS and NSHS and optimize firms’ OI efforts and the improved IP benefits derived from them.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Anne-Laure Fayard and John Van Maanen

The purpose of this paper is to describe and reflect on the experience as corporate ethnographers working in (and for) a large, multinational company with a remit to study…

1403

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe and reflect on the experience as corporate ethnographers working in (and for) a large, multinational company with a remit to study and articulate “the culture of the firm.”

Design/methodology/approach

The research relied heavily on interviews and some (participant) observation carried out periodically – in North America, Europe and Asia – over an eight-year period.

Findings

The authors discuss how the studies were produced, received, and occasionally acted on in the firm and the realization over time of the performativity of the work as both expressive and constitutive of firm’s culture.

Research limitations/implications

The increasing entanglement in the organization raises questions regarding emic and etic perspectives and the possibility (or impossibility) of “enduring detachment” or “going native” and the associated, often unintended consequences of being both outsiders and insiders.

Practical implications

The authors start with the premise that ethnography is about producing a written text and conclude by arguing that ethnography is not fully realized until the writing is read.

Social implications

The ethnographic reports, when read by those in the company, made visible a version of Trifecta culture that was interpreted, framed and otherwise responded to in multiple ways by members of the organization.

Originality/value

Corporate ethnography is a growing pursuit undertaken by those inside and outside firms. This paper focusses on how and in what ways corporate ethnography sponsored by and written for those in the company shifts the positioning of the ethnographer in the field, the kinds of texts they produce, and the meanings that readers take away from such texts.

Details

Journal of Organizational Ethnography, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6749

Keywords

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