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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Michael A. Haughton, Anne P. Crick, Stanford E. Moore and Lawrence A. Nicholson

Universities constantly try to balance the need to be seen as research institutions contributing new knowledge to society with the need to be seen as effective teaching…

Abstract

Universities constantly try to balance the need to be seen as research institutions contributing new knowledge to society with the need to be seen as effective teaching institutions. This article describes one way in which the two requirements have been effectively resolved in teaching short courses to non‐university students. The methodology incorporated students and research teams, thus drawing on the strengths of both. The result is enhanced student participation and motivation, greater access to data and new insights for the faculty members. The paper concludes by describing other applications of such an approach.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 45 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2008

Anne P. Crick

The purpose of this paper is to determine the extent to which Caribbean hotels are managed in a way that is reminiscent of the plantation system.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the extent to which Caribbean hotels are managed in a way that is reminiscent of the plantation system.

Design/methodology/approach

Surveys are used to determine the human resource challenges and the responses to these challenges in three Caribbean destinations. Survey data is collected from 110 respondents including hotel employees, hotel managers and owners, human resource managers, policy officials and trade union officials.

Findings

The study determined that service excellence is a competitive strategy in the three destinations and managers therefore seek to attract and retain the best performers. Working individually and cooperatively with government and other tourism stakeholders, managers have therefore created a work environment that is empowering and participative rather than one that is reflective of the plantation era.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to the English‐speaking Caribbean and may therefore not be generalisable to the wider Caribbean. Future research should also examine the views in more detail through focus groups.

Originality/value

The paper responds to a commonly held view about tourism by providing an updated and more comprehensive view of the practices in Caribbean hotels. It also differentiates between the practices of small and large hotels.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2011

Anne P. Crick and Andrew Spencer

This article aims to discuss issues related to service quality in the hotel industry. It highlights unique aspects of hotel work and the implications for service delivery…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to discuss issues related to service quality in the hotel industry. It highlights unique aspects of hotel work and the implications for service delivery, and discusses methods used to measure service quality and expectations.

Design/methodology/approach

Through an assessment of the extensive body of literature on quality service in general and within hotel contexts, some key themes emerge which have been explored in detail. Much of the analysis focuses on how the body of knowledge has developed over time and points to strengths and weaknesses in the literature.

Findings

There has been much debate about what constitutes quality service and more specifically how this applies to the hotel industry. The industry is a dynamic one in which the guest dictates the pace and type of service, and in which increasing competitiveness has resulted in satisfactory service being the minimum expectation of guests. Different measurements of service expectations have been proposed for the hotel industry but the most promising is the quality function deployment (QFD) approach, which treats service as a process in which the guest ' s expectations are measured at every stage in order to create service that meets and potentially exceeds their expectations.

Practical implications

The highlighted differences between hospitality, hotel and other service organisations indicate where managers and researchers need to place their emphasis in order to enhance the level of service quality.

Originality/value

The paper adds new urgency to the need to develop effective measures and understanding of the hospitality and in particular the hotel experience.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Anne P. Crick

Tourism is the mainstay of the Caribbean and the attitude of the people in the region may have a significant impact on the success of the industry. This paper analyzes the…

Abstract

Tourism is the mainstay of the Caribbean and the attitude of the people in the region may have a significant impact on the success of the industry. This paper analyzes the way in which tourism authorities of three Caribbean destinations have internally marketed tourism to their host populations in order to encourage the desired attitudinal expressions. A matrix of five possible responses to tourism was developed and each of the three countries was found to occupy different positions in the matrix. An analysis of the internal marketing strategies determined that the countries adopted different approaches based on their particular challenges but none of the approaches had achieved lasting success. The study concludes with recommendations for future research.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Book part
Publication date: 10 November 2011

Anne P. Crick

This chapter examines the phenomena of third places as institutions that provide social interaction outside of home and work. The study explores the different types of…

Abstract

This chapter examines the phenomena of third places as institutions that provide social interaction outside of home and work. The study explores the different types of third places and the opportunities and challenges offered by each. This is a conceptual paper that examines different conceptualizations of third places using brand examples to highlight the ways in which organizations try to benefit from society's need for a neutral gathering place. The chapter highlights the growth of organizations seeking to benefit from the phenomena of third places and the opportunities for them to profit further. The chapter also highlights the potential for virtual third places to enhance opportunities for increasing brand awareness and sales of products and services at other third places. The chapter identifies ways in which hospitality organizations can capitalize on the public's need for third places. The study moves the discussion beyond the rather limited perspective Oldenburg presented and shows how the needs of a new generation may require more flexibility and excitement than other generations. The study also highlights the ways in which organizations use a combination of third places to their benefit. Third places create opportunities for social interaction and community building and benefit organizations once they position themselves to achieve the status of third places. This chapter compares different conceptualizations of third places and shows the similarities and differences between them. It shows how organizations may position themselves to appeal to different generations seeking a third place.

Details

Tourism Sensemaking: Strategies to Give Meaning to Experience
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-853-4

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Abstract

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Book part
Publication date: 10 November 2011

Abstract

Details

Tourism Sensemaking: Strategies to Give Meaning to Experience
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-853-4

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Book part
Publication date: 28 August 2020

Laëtitia Gabay-Mariani and Anne-Flore Adam

This chapter seeks to advance ongoing research concerning entrepreneurial commitment. While the concept of commitment has been addressed time and again in organizational…

Abstract

This chapter seeks to advance ongoing research concerning entrepreneurial commitment. While the concept of commitment has been addressed time and again in organizational literature, few entrepreneurship scholars have used it to understand entrepreneurial behaviors. In line with recent developments in entrepreneurial psycho-social literature (Fayolle & Liñán, 2014; Adam & Fayolle, 2015; Van Gelderen, Kautonen, Wincent, & Biniari, 2018), this conceptual chapter aims to advance understanding of the concept of commitment in the context of emerging organizations. Building on Meyer and Allen’s three-component model of commitment (TCM), it addresses how this multidimensional concept, developed in the organizational setting, is a lens through which one can investigate volitional phases of the entrepreneurial process (Van Gelderen, Kautonen, & Fink, 2015). Our work also explores how the TCM could be specifically adapted for emerging organizations, drawing on its main evolutions and re-conceptualizations since the 1990s. In this way, it uncovers potential avenues for further research on how to operationalize entrepreneurial activity. In doing so, it enhances knowledge of the entrepreneurial process and can improve training and support techniques for nascent entrepreneurs. It also contributes to broader discussions on the TCM and how it should be adapted in order to foster self-determined processes.

Details

The Entrepreneurial Behaviour: Unveiling the cognitive and emotional aspect of entrepreneurship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-508-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Adamantios Diamantopoulos, Anne L. Souchon, Geoffrey R. Durden, Catherine N. Axinn and Hartmut H. Holzmüller

The extent to which and ways in which export information is used can play a significant role in a firm's level of export performance. Surprisingly, however, little…

Abstract

The extent to which and ways in which export information is used can play a significant role in a firm's level of export performance. Surprisingly, however, little empirical research has been conducted in the area of export information use, and even less attention has been paid to potential cross‐national differences in how export information is used. The focus of this study is the examination of export information use practices across different countries. Data from a total sample of 989 exporting companies across Austria, Germany, New Zealand, the UK, and the USA were analyzed using analyses of covariance to control for extraneous, firm‐level variables. The results indicate that firms from all countries use information instrumentally/conceptually more often than symbolically; they also tend to use export market intelligence more than other sources of information. Further, examination of the findings revealed that firms from different countries also use information differently. For instance, US exporters are much more symbolic in their use of information than exporters from the other countries, while Austrian exporters tend not to use information symbolically. Implications and limitations are discussed and future research avenues are proposed.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

Anne L. Souchon and Adamantios Diamantopoulos

Export information acquisition has mostly been examined disparately as researchers have tended to focus on certain modes of information acquisition independently of…

Abstract

Export information acquisition has mostly been examined disparately as researchers have tended to focus on certain modes of information acquisition independently of others. Furthermore, past studies have typically employed single‐item measures to operationalize information acquisition. The present study attempts to redress these deficiencies by considering a comprehensive set of export information acquisition modes and by developing psychometrically sound measures for each. The results show the adequacy of considering three broad export information acquisition modes (export marketing research, export assistance, and export market intelligence), each of which is operationalized by means of a multi‐item scale. The latter are shown to be reliable and to possess content, convergent, discriminant, and nomological validity.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

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