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1 – 10 of 86
Article
Publication date: 6 January 2012

Nenna Ndukwe, David W. Borowski, Angela Lee, Anne Orr, Sarah Dexter‐Smith and Anil K. Agarwal

There has been considerable interest in the “two‐week rule” referral pathway efficacy for patients with suspected colorectal cancer. This study aims to explore the…

Abstract

Purpose

There has been considerable interest in the “two‐week rule” referral pathway efficacy for patients with suspected colorectal cancer. This study aims to explore the psychological impact on these patients.

Design/methodology/approach

Consecutive patients referred for urgent investigations under the “two‐week rule” were invited to take part in semi‐structured interviews using interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA). Interviews were audio‐taped, transcribed verbatim and analysed using investigator triangulation to enhance data trustworthiness.

Findings

Ten out of 23 (43.5 per cent) patients consented to interviews; none were diagnosed with cancer. Four super‐ordinate themes were explored, referring to the “making sense of the threat to health”, impact on self, impact on others, reflections on the “two‐week rule” referral, and its investigative process. Participants reported their anxiety, fear, vulnerability and coping mechanisms, but also raised concerns about the communication received during the “two‐week rule” referral process. Female participants preferred a female endoscopist.

Originality/value

This study is the first of its kind exploring the psychological effects of the “two‐week rule” process for colorectal cancer, highlighting potential areas for improvement in patient information, and satisfaction with the referral process.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 May 2016

John Muhumuza Kakitahi, Henry Mwanaki Alinaitwe, Anne Landin and Simon James Mone

The purpose of this paper was to assess the magnitude of the impact of construction-related rework on selected project budgets and schedule in public building construction…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to assess the magnitude of the impact of construction-related rework on selected project budgets and schedule in public building construction in Uganda. The magnitude of construction-related rework was the mean determined over construction contracts under a selected project and expressed as a percentage of the construction contract sum.

Design/methodology/approach

A single case multi-unit study approach was adopted. A case study protocol was prepared that included a checklist, observation schedules and an interview guide. The three instruments were used to collect data from building contractors and end-users (the teaching staff and medical assistants). Representatives of the client entity and the end-users provided sufficient project documentation and related supplementary information for the study.

Findings

Construction-related rework was predominantly attributable to design information omissions, unacceptable workmanship and inadequate supervision of the contractor. Lightning conductor, electrical and roofing installations were the building elements that had the highest frequency of rework. It was further determined that the mean percentage of rework related impact on project budget and schedule was approximately 4.53 and 8.42 per cent, respectively.

Originality/value

The findings inform policy makers about likely areas that contribute to significant wastage and value loss in quality management of public sector projects. The research advocates for improved data collection protocols, integration of adequate design management and a whole life value philosophy during the public building construction process.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 September 2009

Anne Edwards

This article focuses on the conditions that are conducive to effective work on reducing children's vulnerability to social exclusion. It draws on three studies of…

Abstract

This article focuses on the conditions that are conducive to effective work on reducing children's vulnerability to social exclusion. It draws on three studies of practitioners who are collaborating to prevent the social exclusion of children and young people. Two ideas are discussed: distributed expertise and relational agency. Distributed expertise recognises that expertise is distributed across local systems and that practitioners need to become adept at recognising, drawing on and contributing to it. Relational agency offers a finer‐grained analysis of what is involved in working in systems of distributed expertise. Findings include the need for professionals to develop relational agency as an extra layer of expertise alongside their core professional expertise and a concern that interprofessional work may result in seeing clients as tasks to be worked on rather than people to be worked with relationally. Implications for training and professional development are outlined.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 3 September 2019

Jeffrey Berman

Abstract

Details

Mad Muse: The Mental Illness Memoir in a Writer's Life and Work
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-810-0

Article
Publication date: 20 November 2017

Ruwini Edirisinghe, Kerry Anne London, Pushpitha Kalutara and Guillermo Aranda-Mena

Building information modelling (BIM) is increasingly being adopted during construction projects. Design and construction practices are adjusting to the new system. BIM is…

3697

Abstract

Purpose

Building information modelling (BIM) is increasingly being adopted during construction projects. Design and construction practices are adjusting to the new system. BIM is intended to support the entire project life-cycle: the design and construction phases, and also facility management (FM). However, BIM-enabled FM remains in its infancy and has not yet reached its full potential. The purpose of this paper is to identify major aspects of BIM in order to derive a fully BIM-enabled FM process.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 207 papers were classified into main and subordinate research areas for quantitative analysis. These findings were then used to conceptualise a BIM-enabled FM framework grounded by innovation diffusion theory for adoption, and for determining the path of future research.

Findings

Through an extensive literature review, the paper summarises many benefits and challenges. Major aspects of BIM are identified in order to describe a BIM-enabled FM implementation process grounded by innovation diffusion theory. The major research areas of the proposed framework include: planning and guidelines; value realisation; internal leadership and knowledge; procurement; FM; specific application areas; data capture techniques; data integration; knowledge management; and legal and policy impact. Each element is detailed and is supported by literature. Finally, gaps are highlighted for investigation in future research.

Originality/value

This paper systematically classifies and evaluates the existing research, thus contributing to the achievement of the ultimate vision of BIM-enabled FM. The proposed framework informs facility managers, and the BIM-enabled FM implementation process. Further, the holistic survey identifies gaps in the body of knowledge, revealing avenues for future research.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2001

Stuart Orr, Amrik S. Sohal, Katherine Gray, Jennine Harbrow, David Harrison and Anne Mennen

This paper presents the results of a survey of senior and middle managers from the Southern Health Care Network in Victoria, Australia. The survey was conducted to…

1354

Abstract

This paper presents the results of a survey of senior and middle managers from the Southern Health Care Network in Victoria, Australia. The survey was conducted to determine whether IT is used as a strategic tool to meet competitive issues within the health care industry. A detailed interview was also conducted with the senior manager of information systems for the Southern Health Care Network. The research sought to identify the strategic IT issues facing the health care sector, whether IT was currently used as a source of competitive advantage within the network or by competitors, key factors for successful IT implementation and any impediments to taking full advantage of IT. The research identified a lack of understanding of IT options and potential benefits in this industry. It also determined that there was little or no awareness of the competitive advantage that could be achieved through IT. The role of IT within the network was found to be constrained at the level of providing a supporting infrastructure for users rather than one of being pivotal for organisational strategic advantage.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Sandra Wooltorton, Anne Wilkinson, Pierre Horwitz, Sue Bahn, Janice Redmond and Julian Dooley

Academic approaches to the challenge of enhancing sustainability in research in university contexts illustrate that universities are affected by the very same values and…

1747

Abstract

Purpose

Academic approaches to the challenge of enhancing sustainability in research in university contexts illustrate that universities are affected by the very same values and socio-ecological issues they set out to address, making transformation difficult at every level. A theoretical and practical framework designed to facilitate cultural transformation is therefore necessary for conceptualising the problem and delineating possible strategies to enhance sustainability in research. Organisational change is also required, possibly on a university-by-university basis, where cross-institutional learning may be possible with personal behaviours that enhance collaboration across disciplinary and administrative divides.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper contends that action research, in particular, community action research (CAR), offers the best approach to this task because it focusses on learning and change, and these are both essential to cultural transformation. A case study from a university in Western Australia is used to demonstrate this approach.

Findings

The case study analysis shows some evidence for the presence of knowledge for organisational transformation, and that future monitoring cycles will be needed to detect the extent of the change.

Originality/value

The paper introduces CAR as an approach to advance the change for sustainability in higher education and discusses some of the implications for universities who are looking to incorporate sustainability as a major part of their culture.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 July 2013

John Muhumuza Kakitahi, Anne Landin and Henry M. Alinaitwe

Rework is known to contribute to waste and value losses in building design and construction. Studies estimate its magnitude between 2 and 25 per cent of construction…

Abstract

Purpose

Rework is known to contribute to waste and value losses in building design and construction. Studies estimate its magnitude between 2 and 25 per cent of construction contract sums. Rework‐related waste could, however, be higher if the whole life cycle of building facilities is considered. Rework occurrences are increasing in Uganda and yet the National Development Plan 2010/11 – 14/15 intends to construct additional public buildings. With insufficient information regarding rework causality and magnitude, wastage arising from rework during the implementation of the National Development Plan could be substantial. The problem of rework occurrence in Uganda will require determining rework causality and magnitude. This paper seeks to address these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory study on rework in public building construction was undertaken through a case study to understand its causality and the timeframe over which it occurs. This preliminary research is characteristically qualitative with the aim of investigating rework causality in public building construction in Uganda. The case study was based on a project that rehabilitated and constructed new buildings in 15 nursing schools across Uganda. Semi‐structured interviews, contract documentation and archival records were used as sources of information on rework causality. Selective coding and subsequent categorisation of rework data was undertaken to support analysis of rework causality.

Findings

The findings supplement limited previous research that shows rework as a phenomenon existing into the operation and maintenance stage of building facilities. Rework‐related costs during this stage for the case study, referred to as operation‐related rework costs, were on average 0.25 per cent of construction contract sums. Significant causes of rework were ineffective stakeholder management, insufficient works supervision and use of non‐compliant building materials.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the need for improved design management, effective stakeholder management and a whole life value philosophy in order to reduce rework in public building construction.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1978

The most obvious symptom of the most obvious trend in the building of new libraries is the fact that, as yet, no spade has entered the ground of the site on Euston Road…

Abstract

The most obvious symptom of the most obvious trend in the building of new libraries is the fact that, as yet, no spade has entered the ground of the site on Euston Road, London, upon which the new building for the British Library Reference Division has to be erected. Some twenty years of continued negotiation and discussion finally resulted in the choice of this site. The UK and much more of the world awaits with anticipation what could and should be the major building library of the twentieth century. The planning and design of a library building, however large or small, is, relatively speaking, a major operation, and deserves time, care and patience if the best results are to be produced.

Details

Library Review, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Article
Publication date: 3 May 2016

Cathy Howlett, Jo-Anne Ferreira and Jessica Blomfield

This paper aims to argue that substantive changes are required in both curricula and pedagogical practice in higher education institutions to challenge dominant…

3234

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to argue that substantive changes are required in both curricula and pedagogical practice in higher education institutions to challenge dominant epistemologies and discourses and to unsettle current ways of thinking about, and acting in relation to, the environment. Central to such a shift, it is argued, is the need for higher education curricula to be interdisciplinary and for pedagogical practices to work to build capacities in students for critical and reflective thinking.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, a case study of our reflections is offered on a subject designed to promote capacities in students for critical and reflective thinking via an interdisciplinary approach. The paper uses data from student reflective essays and student course evaluations to make an argument for the success of this approach.

Findings

Genuine transformative learning can occur within a constructivist informed pedagogical approach to teaching for sustainability.

Research limitations/implications

Research implications are that genuine transformation can occur in students’ thinking processes (which the paper argues is critical for effective education in sustainability) with appropriately designed courses in higher education.

Practical implications

More effective environmental actors and thinkers, who can critically engage with the complexity of environmental problems.

Social implications

Social implications include a more effective and socially just higher education for sustainability

Originality/value

The authors know of no other narrative that addresses attempts to educate for sustainability using this approach.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

1 – 10 of 86