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Abstract

Details

International Journal of Public Leadership, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4929

Book part
Publication date: 21 June 2005

Ruth M. Mann

This chapter addresses a five-year phase of protest activity set in motion by fathers’ rights and shared parenting groups’ resistance to the Federal Child Support Guidelines…

Abstract

This chapter addresses a five-year phase of protest activity set in motion by fathers’ rights and shared parenting groups’ resistance to the Federal Child Support Guidelines, which were incorporated into Canada’s Divorce Act in 1997. Drawing upon Department of Justice discourses, parliamentary hearings and debates, and advocacy websites it examines the dynamics and outcomes of the protest cycle. It argues that the government’s legislative response signals a failure of fathers’ rights activism in Canada. This failure is a consequence of the collective identity that advocates and their supporters enact and celebrate in various public arenas, the effectiveness of feminist counteraction, and the contingencies of governance in Canada’s left-of-centre advanced liberal democracy.

Details

Studies in Law, Politics and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-327-3

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

32

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

66

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 November 2003

59

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

63

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Public Leadership, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4929

Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Daniel Mason, Stacy-Lynn Sant and Brian Soebbing

The purpose of this paper is to examine how North American professional team owners are engaging in broader urban development projects that have their teams as anchor tenants in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how North American professional team owners are engaging in broader urban development projects that have their teams as anchor tenants in new sports facilities, by examining the case of Rogers Arena in Edmonton, Canada.

Design/methodology/approach

Approached from a constructionist perspective, the study employed an instrumental case study strategy as it facilitates understanding and description of a particular phenomenon and allows researchers to use the case as a comparative point across other settings (with similar conditions) in which the phenomenon might be present.

Findings

Using urban regime theory as a framework, the authors found that in Edmonton, the team owner was able to align his interests with other political and business interests by engaging in a development strategy that increased the vibrancy of Edmonton’s downtown core. As a result, the owner was able to garner support for both the arena and the surrounding development.

Research limitations/implications

The authors argue that this new model of team owner as developer has several implications: on-field performance may only be important insofar as it drives demand for the development; the owner’s focus is on driving revenues and profits from interests outside of the sports facility itself; and the team (and the threat of relocation) is leveraged to gain master developer status for the ownership group.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the understanding of owner interests and how franchise profitability and solvency can be tied to other related business interests controlled by team owners.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Ciska Wittouck, Anne Dekkers, Wouter Vanderplasschen and Freya Vander Laenen

Problem solving courts are a result of the therapeutic jurisprudence movement. Drug treatment courts (DTCs), for instance, aim to divert substance using offenders away from the…

Abstract

Purpose

Problem solving courts are a result of the therapeutic jurisprudence movement. Drug treatment courts (DTCs), for instance, aim to divert substance using offenders away from the criminal justice system (CJS) to (drug) treatment services. DTCs are associated with reduced criminal offending and substance use. Psychosocial outcomes of DTCs, such as employment, health and family relations, received only little attention. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper focuses on the outcomes regarding substance use and psychosocial variables of a Belgian DTC situated in the Ghent region, which were investigated by a naturalistic evaluation study with a pre- post-design using judicial files.

Findings

The results show that Ghent DTC clients were diverted to drug treatment and financial counselling services. Next the Ghent DTC produced beneficial outcomes regarding employment. Contrary to criminal offending (De Keulenaer and Thomaes, 2013), substance use was not significantly reduced in the Ghent DTC sample. Yet more compliance with opioid maintenance treatment was observed. Information on more client centred outcomes such as health and social relations was lacking, precluding a full outcome measurement of psychosocial variables.

Research limitations/implications

Future DTC studies should address more client centreed outcomes by gathering information through DTC clients and treatment services instead of solely relying on judicial data sources. In addition, DTCs should develop a clear and uniform registration system regarding these outcomes.

Originality/value

Since the therapeutic jurisprudence movement continues to expand, discussion regarding the roles and tasks of the CJS as well as treatment and counselling services is vital. Each actor should maintain its own role and task, regarding monitoring and substantive work, to insure a “problem solving approach” that is in line with the recovery philosophy.

Details

Therapeutic Communities: The International Journal of Therapeutic Communities, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-1866

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 May 2010

Axel Klein

Abstract

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

1 – 10 of 24