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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Anne M. Lavack

Faced with ever-increasing advertising restrictions, sponsorship of sports has been an important promotional avenue for tobacco companies in North America and around the…

Abstract

Faced with ever-increasing advertising restrictions, sponsorship of sports has been an important promotional avenue for tobacco companies in North America and around the world. This paper examines the corporate sponsorship objectives and strategies of tobacco companies, based primarily on historical documents from the British-American Tobacco Co., which has operations in over 80 countries. The documents are part of the Guildford Depository located in Guildford, England. It contains over six million pages of corporate documents for the British-American Tobacco Company (BAT) from a 40-year span (early 1950s to mid 1990s). Tobacco company sponsorship practices include developing sponsorship evaluation guidelines, extensive prepromotion and post-promotion of sponsored events, making full use of the event site for sponsorship identification, ensuring that sponsored events are televised, and using an extensive array of public relations practices to ensure news coverage of a sponsored event. Other sponsors could benefit from emulating the sponsorship practices of tobacco companies.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2003

Mrugank V. Thakor and Anne M. Lavack

Reviews recent work in the country of origin and brand name literatures regarding the formation of perceptions regarding perceived brand origin. Based on this review…

Abstract

Reviews recent work in the country of origin and brand name literatures regarding the formation of perceptions regarding perceived brand origin. Based on this review, presents six hypotheses concerning such perceptions, including their effect on consumers’ ratings of quality. Using real brands in two experiments, finds support for several of our hypotheses relating to the effects of country of component source, country of manufacture, and country of corporate ownership. In particular, finds that country of manufacture had no effect on product quality evaluations when country of corporate ownership was also present.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Fredric Kropp, Anne M. Lavack and David H. Silvera

This cross‐cultural study examines inter‐relationships between values (using the list of values), collective self‐esteem (CSE), and consumer susceptibility to…

Abstract

Purpose

This cross‐cultural study examines inter‐relationships between values (using the list of values), collective self‐esteem (CSE), and consumer susceptibility to interpersonal influence (CSII).

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through surveys administered to 783 university students in four countries (Australia, English‐speaking Canada, Korea, and Norway).

Findings

Results indicate that external and interpersonal values are positively related to the normative component of CSII, while internal values are negatively related to the normative component of CSII. The CSE subscale measuring importance of the group to one's identity is positively related to normative CSII, while the CSE subscale of membership esteem is negatively related to normative CSII. Normative CSII was substantially higher among Korean participants than among participants from the other countries.

Research limitations/implications

This research was limited to a sample of university students in Canada, Australia, Norway, and Korea. Future research could expand the sample to include a more representative adult sample, in order to ensure the generalizability of the results.

Practical implications

CSII may be an important factor in many consumer purchases that relate to self‐image. The relationship of values and collective self‐esteem to CSII provides valuable insights to managers regarding consumer purchasing behavior.

Originality/value

Given that values, consumer self‐esteem, and country explain a large degree of the variation in consumer susceptibility to interpersonal influence, managers can benefit from this knowledge when developing advertising content and marketing interventions.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2009

Magdalena Cismaru, Anne M. Lavack and Evan Markewich

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of social marketing programs in preventing drunk driving, and how protection motivation theory (PMT) can be used to create…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of social marketing programs in preventing drunk driving, and how protection motivation theory (PMT) can be used to create effective anti drunk driving communications.

Design/methodology/approach

Communication and program materials aimed at reducing drunk driving were identified and gathered from English‐language websites from the USA, Canada, UK, Australia, and New Zealand, and a qualitative review was conducted.

Findings

The review provides a description of the key themes and messages being used in anti drunk driving campaigns, as well as target population, campaign components, and sources of funding. A key facet of this review is the examination of the use of PMT in social marketing campaigns designed to prevent drunk driving.

Originality/value

The review presents social marketing campaigns aimed at preventing drunk driving in English‐speaking countries, and shows that PMT can be successfully used in this context. The paper provides a guide for future initiatives, as well as recommendations for social marketing practitioners.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2008

David H. Silvera, Anne M. Lavack and Fredric Kropp

The purpose of this research is to examine predictors of impulse buying. Although moderate levels of impulse buying can be pleasant and gratifying, recent theoretical work…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to examine predictors of impulse buying. Although moderate levels of impulse buying can be pleasant and gratifying, recent theoretical work suggests that chronic, high frequency impulse buying has a compulsive element and can function as a form of escape from negative affective states, depression, and low self‐esteem.

Design/methodology/approach

The present research empirically tests a theoretical model of impulse buying by examining the associations between chronic impulse buying tendencies and subjective wellbeing, affect, susceptibility to interpersonal influence, and self‐esteem.

Findings

Results indicate that the cognitive facet of impulse buying, associated with a lack of planning in relation to purchase decisions, is negatively associated with subjective wellbeing. The affective facet of impulse buying, associated with feelings of excitement and an overpowering urge to buy, is linked to negative affect and susceptibility to interpersonal influence.

Practical implications

Given the link to negative emotions and potentially harmful consequences, impulse buying may be viewed as problematic consumer behavior. Reductions in problematic impulse buying could be addressed through public policy or social marketing.

Originality/value

This study validates and extends the Verplanken et al. model by examining the relationship between impulse buying and other psychological constructs (i.e. subjective wellbeing, positive and negative affect, social influence, and self‐esteem).

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2008

Magdalena Cismaru, Anne M. Lavack and Evan Markewich

This paper aims to examine social marketing programs aimed at preventing or moderating alcohol consumption among young consumers. It seeks to show how protection…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine social marketing programs aimed at preventing or moderating alcohol consumption among young consumers. It seeks to show how protection motivation theory can be used as a theoretical framework to create effective communications targeting young people.

Design/methodology/approach

Communication materials aimed at preventing or moderating alcohol consumption among young people were identified and gathered from web sites in five English‐speaking countries (USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and the UK). A qualitative review of these materials was conducted.

Findings

A majority of the alcohol moderation/prevention campaigns targeting young consumers followed the tenets of protection motivation theory by focusing on the threat variables of severity and vulnerability. Some campaigns also focused on costs, as well as self‐efficacy and response efficacy.

Research limitations/implications

Only English‐language materials and materials targeting young consumers have been considered, so findings cannot necessarily be generalized to other languages or countries.

Practical implications

Future youth alcohol moderation/prevention initiatives should include self‐efficacy messages, to increase confidence among young people that they are able to carry out the recommended actions.

Originality/value

The review presents a comprehensive examination of initiatives aimed at preventing/reducing alcohol consumption among young consumers, and shows how protection motivation theory can be successfully used in this context.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Fredric Kropp, Anne M. Lavack and Stephen J.S. Holden

Examines the personal values of college‐age smokers and beer drinkers, as well as their susceptibility to interpersonal influence. Findings suggest that, compared to…

Abstract

Examines the personal values of college‐age smokers and beer drinkers, as well as their susceptibility to interpersonal influence. Findings suggest that, compared to non‐smokers, smokers are less likely to place importance on the values of security, being well respected, and having a sense of belonging. When compared to non‐beer drinkers, college students who are beer drinkers are more likely to place importance on the value of excitement, and are less likely to place importance on the value of security. Smokers are less susceptible to interpersonal influence than non‐smokers, but there are no differences in susceptibility to interpersonal influence between beer drinkers and non‐beer drinkers. Values and susceptibility to interpersonal influence can play a useful role as descriptors, and possibly as predictors, of drinking and smoking behavior.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Chung K. Kim and Anne M. Lavack

Relates evidence which suggests that launching a vertical brand extension generally has a negative impact on the core brand because it dilutes the core brand image…

Abstract

Relates evidence which suggests that launching a vertical brand extension generally has a negative impact on the core brand because it dilutes the core brand image, advising that a brand extension should be introduced only when its profit potential exceeds the losses that will be sustained as a result of damage to the core brand. Describes two important tools which can reduce the dilution of the core brand image and/or enhance the success of a new brand extension introduction distancing, and information cues: Explains that, to reduce damage to a valuable core brand or to benefit a new step‐up brand extension, the extension should be maximally distanced from the core brand; however, to benefit a new step‐down brand extension (at the expense of the core brand), the extension should be positioned close to the core brand. Highlights how information cues that describe a brand extension can also act like distancing techniques, simply by serving to reinforce the similarities (implied closeness) or differences (implied distance) between the brand extension and the core brand.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 5 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 17 October 2019

Debra Z. Basil, Michael Basil, Anne Marie Lavack and Sameer Deshpande

The purpose of this study is to propose environmental efficacy as the perception of social, physical resource and temporal factors at one’s disposal that promote or impede…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to propose environmental efficacy as the perception of social, physical resource and temporal factors at one’s disposal that promote or impede behavior. In this exploratory study, four focus groups and a two-country survey provide support for a new environmental efficacy construct as an adjunct to self and response efficacies.

Design/methodology/approach

This research examines environmental efficacy within the context of workplace safety. The research engaged participants from four focus groups as well as a survey of 358 young Canadian males and 494 young American males to test the proposed construct.

Findings

First, qualitative responses from the focus groups supported environmental efficacy as a viable construct. Second, a factor analysis demonstrated environmental efficacy is distinct from self- and response efficacies. Third, regressions demonstrated that environmental efficacy predicts motivation to act, above and beyond self- and response efficacies.

Research limitations/implications

As an exploratory study, only a limited number of scale items were included. The research was conducted within the workplace safety context, using young males, and the stimuli involved the use of fear appeals. These restrictions warrant additional research in the area of environmental efficacy.

Practical implications

This study suggests that further development of the environmental efficacy construct may offer social marketers a more effective means of identifying and addressing barriers to desired behavior change. Such a measure should allow social marketers to improve understanding of the importance of environmental forces.

Originality/value

This research introduces a novel concept, environmental efficacy, and demonstrates that it is a distinctive and useful concept for understanding motivation to act. This concept is potentially valuable to social marketers seeking to enhance the effectiveness of their programs. It offers a tool to help identify barriers that can thwart the effectiveness of interventions.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

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Article
Publication date: 20 May 2021

Long She, Ratneswary Rasiah, Hassam Waheed and Saeed Pahlevan Sharif

This study aims to examine the mediating role of online compulsive buying in the association between excessive use of social networking sites (SNS) and financial…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the mediating role of online compulsive buying in the association between excessive use of social networking sites (SNS) and financial well-being among Chinese young adults.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 539 SNS users and active online shoppers (M age = 20.32 years, SD age = 2.11) completed an online survey questionnaire measure of excessive use of SNS, online compulsive buying and financial well-being. Covariance based-structural equation modelling was used to assess the measurement model and the proposed mediation model.

Findings

Results indicated that excessive use of SNS was positively related to online compulsive buying behaviour and financial anxiety. Also, the results showed that online compulsive buying mediated the positive relationship between excessive use of SNS and financial anxiety.

Practical implications

Several implications were suggested and discussed to enhance the levels of financial well-being among youths by tackling their problematic behaviour such as excessive SNS usage and online compulsive buying.

Originality/value

The findings of this study contribute to the limited body of knowledge in the area of financial well-being and further improves our understanding of the effect of the excessive use of SNS on financial well-being and the mechanism behind it.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

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