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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1995

Anne Lundin

Argues that women's history is a player in the history of collection development, although its awards are obscured in library history. Pioneer women librarians shaped…

Abstract

Argues that women's history is a player in the history of collection development, although its awards are obscured in library history. Pioneer women librarians shaped children's collections beyond the structural initiation of service into an expanded vision of service, a sense of transgressing boundaries in order to advocate and mediate for children and their literature. Considers the philosophy and work of Caroline Hewins and Anne Carroll Moore, which presents a paradigm of building collections for a larger community that is now part of the planning process for public libraries and an ongoing model of activist service through collections.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Anne Lundin

In the novel, The Member of the Wedding, Carson McCullers probes the American malaise through the longings of a young adolescent girl. Twelve‐year‐old Frankie no longer…

Abstract

In the novel, The Member of the Wedding, Carson McCullers probes the American malaise through the longings of a young adolescent girl. Twelve‐year‐old Frankie no longer sees the world as round and inviting as a school globe. No, the world is huge and cracked and turning a thousand miles an hour. Indeed, the world seems separate from herself. In the midst of chaos, Frankie sees her brother's upcoming wedding as a chance to feel connected, to feel that she matters. The story focuses on Frankie's efforts to be a “member of the wedding,” as she recognizes, “they are the we of me.”

Details

Collection Building, vol. 12 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2008

Eleanor Moss

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the overall quality of the Louisville Free Public Library's gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender collection.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the overall quality of the Louisville Free Public Library's gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender collection.

Design/methodology/approach

The study implements an inductive check‐list method. Where other check‐lists compare a list to the collection, ignoring the number of items which do not appear on the list, an inductive method takes a sample of the entire collection, and compares it with several evaluative lists, demonstrating what percentage of the collection is not considered “desirable” by common evaluative lists.

Findings

The results found that 31.9 percent of the LFPL's GLBT collection can be found in the evaluative lists used. Previous inductive evaluations suggest that this number indicates a quality core GLBT collection.

Research limitations/implications

A sample collection was chosen using GLBT‐related subject headings; however, evidence shows that a portion of the actual GLBT collection (perhaps as much as 37.5 percent) lack appropriate subject access control. This results in a potentially flawed sample.

Practical implications

This study provides public librarians with a standard by which they can evaluate their GLBT collections and their library's attempt to meet the needs of a frequently underrepresented minority.

Originality/value

Very few inductive evaluations have been published, and almost none has been published studying GLBT collections. The paper attempts to fill that gap, and provide a deeper standard by which GLBT collections can be evaluated.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Abstract

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Library Review, vol. 51 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Gary O. Rolstad

As librarians contemplate the growing complexity of their institutions and the demands on their time, they often wish they could get back to books and reading, and have…

Abstract

As librarians contemplate the growing complexity of their institutions and the demands on their time, they often wish they could get back to books and reading, and have the chance to suggest books to library users. That used to be so much fun. It felt so good to feel like you were keeping up with the publishing world and your favorite areas of literature, and it felt even better to keep track of your readers and hear their thanks when they were pleased with your suggestions.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 12 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Mona Lundin and Johan Lundin

In this study, online in-service training for people employed in the food production industry is scrutinized. The purpose of this study is to analyse how the participants…

Abstract

Purpose

In this study, online in-service training for people employed in the food production industry is scrutinized. The purpose of this study is to analyse how the participants adapt to such online environments in terms of the kind of discussions they establish. The more specific interest relates to how the participants discuss current work experiences in relation to the contents of quality assurance they are expected to learn.

Design/methodology/approach

The data analyzed are Web discussions in forms of chat log files from ten courses.

Findings

The results show that, on the one hand, general principles have to be substantiated in the form of concrete examples to actually function as principles and, on the other hand, concrete examples are made interesting only if they have a bearing on a more general issue. Another interesting finding is that the course participants gradually take over the vocabulary of quality assurance; they more frequently write about their work in terms of, e.g. criteria, relevance, estimations and hazards. The conclusion is that Web discussions as part of in-service training constitute a new arena for reflection in and on practice.

Originality/value

This is interesting to explore, as it is designed to meet the needs of employers and employees to learn the new set of rules and procedures, which regulate the European food industry. In this respect, the training activities are of direct relevance to daily work practices. Simultaneously, online environments seem to offer flexibility and thus constitute a solution for training in a dispersed industry.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Book part
Publication date: 12 October 2011

Andreas Schwab and Anne S. Miner

Project ventures are an increasingly prevalent organizational form in many industries. The management literature has stressed their flexibility and adaptability…

Abstract

Project ventures are an increasingly prevalent organizational form in many industries. The management literature has stressed their flexibility and adaptability advantages. This chapter focuses on the learning implications of the source of flexibility most essential to project ventures: the ability to switch partners during project formation and execution. This partnering flexibility creates opportunities to respond to new knowledge about characteristics of project tasks and project partners. Partnering flexibility, however, also creates learning challenges. The short-term nature of relationships between project partners and the disintegration of the project team after project completion challenges the accumulation and transfer of knowledge to future projects. Beyond the introduction of related learning opportunities and challenges, we identify potential contingency factors in the project context that shape when partner flexibility will have beneficial versus harmful effects. On the organizational level, we propose that project-governing permanent organizations can support project-venture learning. On the industry level, we highlight potential learning benefits of standardized partner roles and coordination practices. Thus, our chapter introduces a multilevel contingency framework for the evaluation of both learning opportunities and challenges of partnering flexibility in project-venture settings. We formulate testable propositions focused on partner-project fit and project performance.

Details

Project-Based Organizing and Strategic Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-193-0

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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2021

Lamiae Benhayoun, Néstor Fabián Ayala and Marie-Anne Le Dain

We investigate the impact of Absorptive Capacity (ACAP) for SMEs embedded in Collaborative Networks (CNs) on innovation performance, considering the network stages and the…

Abstract

Purpose

We investigate the impact of Absorptive Capacity (ACAP) for SMEs embedded in Collaborative Networks (CNs) on innovation performance, considering the network stages and the influence of partnership quality.

Design/methodology/approach

We use a mixed methodology consisting of a qualitative than a quantitative phase. The first stage relies on an in-depth literature review and 22 interviews with 17 manufacturing SMEs having operated in collaborative innovation projects to characterize the potential and realized ACAP of such SMEs in the creation and operation stages of a CN. The second phase aims at testing four hypotheses through a hierarchical regression based on 74 responses to a survey involving SMEs with prior CN experience.

Findings

Our results explain how an SME’s ACAP in the creation stage affects its ACAP in the operation stage. We also demonstrate that this latter capability contributes positively to innovation performance in the CN. Furthermore, partnership quality was found to have counterproductive effects regarding potential ACAP.

Practical implications

We provide manufacturing SMEs with guidance to deploy ACAP throughout their collaborative experience and overcome the potential pitfalls of good partnership quality.

Originality/value

We operationalize ACAP of manufacturing SMEs to contribute to mutual innovation goals in CNs and uncover its properties. We explain how this dynamic capability accumulates over the CN stages to result in higher innovation performance and show how it helps in striking a balance between the “dark” and “virtuous” sides of partnership quality.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 5 April 2011

Anne Live Vaagaasar

The purpose of this paper is to increase our understanding of how stakeholder relationships develop and how projects can develop the knowledge, skills, and aptitudes…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to increase our understanding of how stakeholder relationships develop and how projects can develop the knowledge, skills, and aptitudes required to handle a multitude of stakeholder relationships. The objective is to provide in‐depth descriptions of what makes up these relationship competencies.

Design/methodology/approach

A longitudinal study was made of a complex technology project. The project was followed for a year and a half. The data material includes more than 20 in‐depth interviews with key actors of the project context and more than 300 hours of participant observations.

Findings

The results show that project competencies in stakeholder management are emergent phenomena which develop through trial and error, and how they, over time, appear as cultivated and fine‐tuned capabilities of communicating. This communication involves narrating, differentiated, yet carefully balanced stories. Little by little, the project's interaction patterns become fine‐tuned and sensitive, with regard to the content and framing, not the least of which is the timing of messages.

Research limitations/implications

Further research is suggested on the development and characteristics of relationship competencies in a project context. Especially, the extent it includes narration and also the characteristics of this narration; how and when is it used and what are the effects.

Practical implications

Project teams should be aware of how they can use stories strategically to deal with a multitude of stakeholder relationships.

Originality/value

Studies on project behavior have been called for. The orginality in this paper lies in the fine‐grained in‐depth descriptions of how a project actually copes with a multitude of stakeholders.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2009

Erling S. Andersen, Anders Dysvik and Anne Live Vaagaasar

Does the organizational culture of the base organization affect the way its projects are carried out? The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between…

Abstract

Purpose

Does the organizational culture of the base organization affect the way its projects are carried out? The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between one aspect of organizational culture, namely the formal rationality of the base organization and how projects are approached. The concept of McDonaldization is used to describe formal rationality; it covers four aspects: efficiency, predictability, calculability and control. Two types of approaches (here called project perspectives) to project management are studied: the task perspective (focus on a clearly defined endeavour from the start of the project) and the organizational perspective (focus on supporting the base organization in its change efforts). The relationship between formal rationality of the base organization and choice of project perspective is revealed.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical study based on a survey of 164 managers.

Findings

The paper shows that the degree of formal organizational rationality affects choice of project perspective: the more rational the base organization, the more dominant the task perspective. The size of the project is of significance, telling us that, in general, larger projects are less task‐ oriented than smaller and medium‐ sized, everything else being equal.

Research limitations/implications

Further studies may be of interest to reveal the relationship between organizational culture of the base organization and project management. Better operationalizations of the constructs of rationality and project perspective are presented, which opens up for further studies on the relationship between rationality and project management.

Practical implications

It is important for managers to know that the way the project work is approached is affected by the organizational rationality of the base organization.

Originality/value

The paper shows the importance of the organizational culture of the base organization, especially the degree of formal rationality, for how project work is done. It presents new operationalizations of formal rationality and project perspective to make way for further studies on the relationship between organizational rationality and project management.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

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