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Article
Publication date: 15 November 2011

Anne Linke and Ansgar Zerfass

Since employees are considered to be one of the most important sources for innovation, the purpose of this study is to create a change management framework for…

Abstract

Purpose

Since employees are considered to be one of the most important sources for innovation, the purpose of this study is to create a change management framework for implementing an innovation culture by means of internal communication.

Design/methodology/approach

First, an interdisciplinary model was derived from research and existing literature. It was then tested in a case study with qualitative expert interviews and a quantitative online survey among all employees of a sample firm.

Findings

Instead of a linear change, as implied by the theoretical model, different identification levels existed simultaneously within the firm's culture. A typology summed up the corresponding perceptions of the innovation culture: innovation culture, innovation pioneers, mediocrity, standstill, and refusal. Significant correlations between identification and internal media (r=0.405), as well as identification and action (r=0.158) underlined the importance of internal communication.

Research limitations/implications

This study only explores the topic from a communication science perspective. However, examining its link to other important factors like organisational structure would provide further insight. Also, research in different countries and fields is needed, since the results of this case study cannot be considered representative.

Practical implications

The goal of communication managers should be to lead employees through the phases of identification by specifically targeting their identification levels and using the appropriate media to address the findings.

Originality/value

The developed framework helps as a management tool for assessing how employees perceive messages of an innovation philosophy and internal media. By linking the internal, innovation, and change communication, it identifies new essential aspects for creating a communication mix and specifically communicating with the target‐group.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2013

Anne Linke and Ansgar Zerfass

When comparing the annotated relevance and the actual application of social media, enormous discrepancies show. This paper aims to introduce the concept of “Social Media…

Abstract

Purpose

When comparing the annotated relevance and the actual application of social media, enormous discrepancies show. This paper aims to introduce the concept of “Social Media Governance” as a means to accelerate the establishment of social media in communication practices and seeks to analyse its status quo in German organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

The data presented here stem from a quantitative online survey among communication professionals that was carried out in Germany.

Findings

The results indicate that although many organizations claim to have strategies for social media communications, nine out of ten had no explicit regulatory frameworks. Strategic pillars, such as managerial commitment and a participative corporate culture, were reported by one third of the organizations. This is crucial, because correlation analyses have revealed that the presence of such structures has a positive effect on skill levels, strategies and the level of activity.

Research limitations/implications

In terms of theory, the concept of governance may be used in order to analyze the dynamics of introducing new modes of online communication.

Practical implications

According to structuration theory, the actions of individual agents will only succeed if everyone involved can resort to structures in the sense of a common stock of (informal) rules and resources. This research indicates that public relations (PR) practices should focus on developing basic structures for social media communications and should not be limited to communications activities.

Originality/value

While previous studies have focused on single aspects of social media governance, e.g. guidelines, very little research has been done on the overall concept. Also, the interconnection of strategic and structural aspects of social media communication has been neglected as a research topic so far.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2012

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how internal communication can be used to manage change in culture to achieve innovation in the workplace.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how internal communication can be used to manage change in culture to achieve innovation in the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and recommendations.

Findings

Competitive advantage means exploiting the genius of the workforce. Managers in some firms do listen to their staff and follow up their ideas, and this may be encouraged by a common culture and by some communication methods. Theoretical research into internal communication, innovation communication and change processes has been combined to form an experimental framework of innovative change. This has been applied, as a case study, to a pharmaceutical firm. It combines qualitative interview techniques to identify the corporate culture with a quantitative e‐mail questionnaire survey of employees. Results indicate the link between communication and innovation.

Practical implications

Managers can test whether their internal communications are effectively selling their business philosophy to staff.

Social implications

Staff whose creativity is encouraged are prouder of their company and of its success.

Originality/value

This review introduces a survey technique that can be developed to show how innovative culture can be evaluated and managed.

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Book part
Publication date: 27 November 2014

Carrie Anne Platt, Renee Bourdeaux and Nancy DiTunnariello

This study investigated how college students’ pace of life and perceptions of communication technologies shape the choices they make when engaging in mediated…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigated how college students’ pace of life and perceptions of communication technologies shape the choices they make when engaging in mediated communication with their parents.

Methodology

We conducted 21 interviews to explore how students’ understandings of various communication technologies, the rules and patterns of technology use in their families, and the circumstances surrounding their use of technologies while at college influence the number and type of media they use to communicate with their parents.

Findings

We found that perceived busyness and generational differences played a large role in limiting technologies used, with environmental factors, the purpose of communication, and complexity of message also contributing to technology choices.

Originality

This study extends media multiplexity theory by investigating media choice and relational tie strength in an intergenerational context.

Details

Communication and Information Technologies Annual
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-629-3

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2018

Andrea Berndgen-Kaiser, Tine Köhler, Markus Wiechert, Stefan Netsch, Christine Ruelle and Anne-Francoise Marique

Single-family houses are a common form of housing in Europe. Most were built in the context of the suburbanization after World War II and are now facing challenges arising…

Abstract

Single-family houses are a common form of housing in Europe. Most were built in the context of the suburbanization after World War II and are now facing challenges arising from generational changes as well as increasing living and energy standards. According to the hypothesis of this paper, in several EU regions, single-family houses may face future challenges arising from oversupply and lack of adaptation to current demand. To examine this, the paper analyses the present situation and discusses the prognosis for the challenges described above regarding the three neighbouring north-western European countries Belgium, Germany, and the Netherlands, based on available data and a review of country-specific characteristics of housing markets as well as national policies. Despite an impending mismatch between demand and supply, planning policies still support the emergence of new single-family houses. The comparison of Belgium, Germany, and the Netherlands shows the growing polarization between shrinking and growing regions and central and peripheral sites apparent at different stages in the three countries. While a high rate of vacancies is already registered for some regions in Germany, in the Netherlands this phenomenon can only be seen near the borders and in villages within the Randstad conurbation. In Belgium also, this phenomenon is not yet widespread, but in some suburban neighbourhoods dating from the 1950's and 1960's more and more single-family houses are becoming more difficult to sell, indicating an emerging mismatch between supply and demand. This article proposes some instruments which enable municipalities to intervene in single family housing neighbourhoods which are largely dominated by private ownership. These instruments are not yet widely established in single-family housing neighbourhoods but that may become important in the future.

Details

Open House International, vol. 43 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2019

Pierre-Jean Barlatier and Anne-Laure Mention

This paper aims to present a framework to guide managerial action for social media (SM) strategies for innovation by exploring its constituent elements – the “what” (SM…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a framework to guide managerial action for social media (SM) strategies for innovation by exploring its constituent elements – the “what” (SM types), the “who” (stakeholders to be reached), the “for” (innovation types) and the “how” (innovation process stages), as well as the value, benefits and barriers.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive and critical review of literature at the intersection of SM and innovation guides the development of a typology of SM types and their use across innovation types and stages.

Findings

SM type and use tend to differ across innovation processes. The authors identify four types of SM in use across four stages of innovation, supporting six types of innovation, influenced by five categories of barriers, benefits and stakeholders each.

Research limitations/implications

The research provides an integrative set of building blocks to consider for developing further studies of SM and innovation.

Practical implications

By highlighting the intertwined aspects of SM and innovation in an open and collaborative environment, the paper calls for development of an SM readiness organisational diagnosis. It empowers managers with a coherent framework of different elements they should take into consideration when defining their SM strategies for innovation.

Originality/value

Research on SM adoption and the extent of its usage for innovation purposes is still at its infancy. Given the increasingly open and collaborative innovation settings, the authors draw managerial attention to the need of SM strategies for innovation activities and provide a coherent analytical framework to guide action for organisational diagnosis.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 41 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2013

Katherine O'Clair

This paper aims to describe a graduate level course in information research for thesis‐based Master's degree students in the College of Agriculture, Food, and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe a graduate level course in information research for thesis‐based Master's degree students in the College of Agriculture, Food, and Environmental Sciences at California Polytechnic State University for which the College Librarian served as the instructor of record. It also seeks to report the results of research conducted to investigate the impact of the course and its effect on graduate student confidence and preparedness.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaires were used to measure student perception of their confidence and preparedness for graduate study and research before and after completing a for‐credit course.

Findings

Students' self‐perceived levels of confidence and preparedness increased after taking the course. Most felt the course was useful and the content would help them to complete their theses more efficiently and effectively. The majority of students also completed the administrative tasks that are required for graduate‐level study.

Originality/value

For‐credit, course‐based information literacy instruction is common for undergraduates at institutions throughout the US, yet similar offerings for graduate students are rare. Graduate students have specific information needs that require a particular set of skills. A for‐credit course designed to meet the needs of graduate students is an effective way to prepare students. Research conducted in conjunction with the offering of this course examines the impact on graduate students' self‐perceived confidence and preparedness.

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Article
Publication date: 20 July 2012

Nujoud Al‐Muomen, Anne Morris and Sally Maynard

This paper seeks to report the results of research conducted to model the information‐seeking behaviour of graduate students at Kuwait University and the factors…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to report the results of research conducted to model the information‐seeking behaviour of graduate students at Kuwait University and the factors influencing that behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

The research employed a number of different approaches: a questionnaire survey to 800 graduate students studying at Kuwait University; a questionnaire survey to 180 academics at the university; semi‐structured interviews with eight academics; face‐to‐face and online interviews with 11 university library staff, four focus groups with 24 students and three focus groups with ten faculty staff.

Findings

Significant factors influencing students' information‐seeking behaviour were found to be related to library awareness, information literacy, organisational and environmental issues, source characteristics, and demographics (specifically gender and nationality).

Research limitations/implications

The research focused on graduate students at a Kuwait University which is affiliated to the government sector, however, the information seeking model is more widely applicable, particularly to other developing countries.

Originality/value

Proposed is an information‐seeking model that extended two other relevant and influential models of information‐seeking behaviour. The extended model shows promise for its intended utility in identifying factors that influence the information behaviour of graduate students.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 68 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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