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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2007

Eva. Høy Engelund, Anne Lassen and Bent Egberg Mikkelsen

Hospital food has come into focus during the last decade due to reports of under‐nutrition and at the same time food service has undergone significant changes. The aim of this…

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Abstract

Purpose

Hospital food has come into focus during the last decade due to reports of under‐nutrition and at the same time food service has undergone significant changes. The aim of this paper is to document and discuss the change in technology and logistics used in the Danish hospital food service during the years 1995‐2003. Further, the aim is to discuss possibilities for integrating food production and patient nutrition at hospitals in order to improve patient nutrition.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical data consist of quantitative serial data on Danish hospital food service collected over a period starting in 1995 and ending in 2003. Data have been collected as part of two large surveys describing the food service systems in Danish hospitals in 1995 and in 2003. Both surveys were carried out by the Food Research Department of the Danish Food Authorities. Answers were compared by means of Chi‐square (χ2) tests with Yates’ correction. Two‐sided p‐values <0.05 were considered significant.

Findings

There have been significant changes in food production systems during the years 1995‐2003. A change in employee profiles in the kitchens has followed this trend.

Practical implications

Plating systems have changed as well with a higher use of buffets and satellite kitchens and less use of central plating during the period 1995‐2003. The educational background of employees has also changed resulting in an increase in number of skilled employees (cooks, catering assistants) and fewer unskilled employees in the kitchens. Increased focus on nutritional status of patients has been observed from ward personnel with no connection to the kitchen. It is suggested that food ambassadors be responsible for the nutritional status of patients.

Originality/value

Success in explaining technological and logistical changes in Danish hospital food service 1995‐2003 another integration of food production and patient nutrition in hospitals.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1995

Anne Lassen and Lars Ovesen

Several studies have shown that microwave cooking, if properlyused, does not change the nutrient content of foods to a larger extentthan conventional heating. In fact, suggests…

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Abstract

Several studies have shown that microwave cooking, if properly used, does not change the nutrient content of foods to a larger extent than conventional heating. In fact, suggests that there is a tendency towards greater retention of many micronutrients with microwaving, probably due to the shorter preparation time. Does not describe non‐thermal effects. The main problem with microwaving is the uneven heating of the food, which has raised concern regarding microbiological safety. Microwaving infant formula and breast milk has become increasingly popular. The content of nutrients and antibacterial factors in milk are maintained unchanged provided the final temperature does not exceed 60°C.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 95 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 March 2009

Anne‐Mette Hjalager, Morten Lassen and Tage Bild

This study investigates the collaboration between Danish nurses' shop stewards and workplace management. The aim of the study is to track changes in workplace climate after a…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates the collaboration between Danish nurses' shop stewards and workplace management. The aim of the study is to track changes in workplace climate after a major structural reform of the health sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The data source for the study is a comprehensive survey among union representatives in the health and care sectors.

Findings

Generally, and not surprisingly, shops stewards maintain closer relations and a higher degree of loyalty to the nearest managers rather than management at higher levels in the hierarchy. It can also be demonstrated that more experienced shop stewards, those who have been employed in this position and in the workplace for the longest terms have more affirmative relations to management than less experienced shop stewards with shorter tenure. Those shop stewards who spend much time on the entitled duties are rewarded with positive collaboration with management. Hard times at the workplace and dissatisfied colleagues, who do not support their union representative, often result in less rewarding relations with management. Quite unexpectedly, the intensity of relations with management is not significantly related to structural or other changes that the workplace has experienced over the past two years. Changes are therefore accepted as inevitable and regular occurrences in the health sector.

Research limitations/implications

The response rate is very high in the survey. Further qualitative research may reveal details about the background and implications.

Practical implications

The study suggests that many shop stewards may suffer from a competence gap in terms of more advanced new public management strategies and tools. This gap has not yet been successfully filled by the services and training activities offered by the Danish Nurses Union.

Originality/value

Results from the study are being taken on board in the union's strategies. The evidence is also helpful for the managers in the health sector, as they are seeking to develop a constructive the collaboration with the unions.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 22 August 2016

Antonella Samoggia, Aldo Bertazzoli, Vaiva Hendrixson, Maria Glibetic and Anne Arvola

The purpose of the chapter is to explore the relation between women’s healthy eating intention and food attitudes, beliefs, perceptions, and barriers with a focus on the effect of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the chapter is to explore the relation between women’s healthy eating intention and food attitudes, beliefs, perceptions, and barriers with a focus on the effect of women’s income differences.

Methodology/approach

The research applies the Theory of Planned Behavior, including attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, perceived barriers, and ability opportunity resources. Close-ended survey responses of 704 women between ages 25 and 65 years, affluent and at-risk-of-poverty women in three EU-member countries were analyzed.

Findings

Women are mostly positively inclined towards healthy eating, and income does not differentiate women’s inclination. Influencing factors are perceived behavioral control, attitudes towards healthy eating, subjective norms, and level of knowledge regarding healthy food. Barriers, when present, are similar for lower or higher income women and relate to routinized family habits and food affordability and availability.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should thoroughly investigate family network and structure features, with a focus on family food preferences and habits.

Social and practical implications

Encouraging women’s healthy behavior also impacts children and men, and vice-versa. There is need to target all family components with enjoyable, self-rewarding, emotionally gratifying, and pleasant tasting food.

Originality/value

Income is an overestimated driver in healthy food choices. Women are strongly influenced by personal and environmental factors, mainly personal control, feelings, and family habits.

Details

Gender and Food: From Production to Consumption and After
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-054-1

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 November 2019

Ann-Louise Holten, Gregory Robert Hancock and Anne Bøllingtoft

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the importance of change leadership (informing, communicating, involving and supporting) and change management (reasons and…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the importance of change leadership (informing, communicating, involving and supporting) and change management (reasons and competencies for change) for organisational change processes and their outcomes across public and private organisations. The study includes three specific change situations: first, layoffs; second, mergers; and third, closures, relocations and outsourcing, focusing on how change leadership and change management relate to employees’ experience of the change processes and their outcomes across these change situations.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on panel data forming a representative sample of the Danish working population. A total of 2,120 responses were collected, 1,000 from public organisations and 1,120 from private organisations. Structural equation modelling was used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The study findings show that both change leadership and change management predict positive change experiences and change consequences – and that they do so similarly across public and private sectors. Despite this similarity, the study reveals important sectorial differences, with public sector employees reporting less positive change experiences and consequences.

Originality/value

The paper provides valuable knowledge for researchers and public and private leaders interested in the impact of change leadership and change management on change outcomes.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 58 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Corporate Fraud Exposed
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-418-8

Article
Publication date: 31 August 2023

Lucia Espinosa-Brisset, Caroline Pénicaud, Isabelle Souchon and Anne Saint-Eve

The purpose of this paper is to better understand consumer's familiarity with fruit processing as well as how fruit production conditions (organic and conventional farming)…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to better understand consumer's familiarity with fruit processing as well as how fruit production conditions (organic and conventional farming), processing conditions (homemade, artisanal and industrial) and the type of processing (e.g. applesauce, apple cider and apple sorbet) influence consumer perceptions of processed fruits.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey questionnaire was applied to 1,000 people living in France. The people represented different genders, ages (18–60+) and sociodemographic categories. Participants were categorized based on their produce purchasing habits (conventional, local, organic, local-organic). The questionnaire contained multiple choice and five point Likert scale questions. Data were analyzed using non-parametric tests.

Findings

The authors found that participants saw year-round availability, fruit preservation and food waste reduction as processing advantages. Locally sourced products were preferred to organic products. The perceived disadvantages to processing were additive usage, nutrient loss and packaging. For consumers, these disadvantages drove highly differentiated perceptions of industrial versus artisanal/homemade apple products. Processing conditions appeared to matter far more than production conditions (organic vs. conventional). In general, consumers weren't familiar with processing operations, awareness was greater for consumers of local and/or organic produce than conventional consumers.

Social implications

There must be a societal transition toward healthier diets, and food technologies. Informed consumers, might be better equipped to make healthy, informed choices if the consumers are given quality information about food production and processing at different levels.

Originality/value

Research has shown that consumers view fresh organic fruit positively, but only few studies have looked at perceptions of processed fruit products and their familiarity with processing operations. Results of this study demonstrate that consumers could make better choices if the consumers are given quality information about fruit production and processing.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 125 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 3 May 2022

Anne Parkatti, Tiina Saari, Mia Tammelin and Mikko Villi

This article aims to study digital competence (DC) in media work.

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Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to study digital competence (DC) in media work.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors utilize frame analysis to investigate how DC is framed in media work using 30 semi-structured interviews as data with journalists in Finland.

Findings

The authors identify three main frames of DC in the context of media work. The individual attitude frame emphasizes employees' attitudes toward DC, the team-level support frame underlines the need for support in the work community and the organizational-level practice frame highlights enablers of and organizations' requirements for digital competence.

Practical implications

First, media workers' DC is necessary to enhance work efficiency and accomplish tasks and may be supported with supportive management practices. Second, the findings suggest that DC should be understood and analyzed as a multi-level issue. Third, the findings suggest that appropriate continuing education and study opportunities were needed. Besides formal arrangements for learning, informal contexts of learning are important.

Originality/value

The article contributes to media studies and studies on the digitalization of work by taking account of the organizational, team and individual levels in discussing digital competence in the news media sector.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 42 no. 13/14
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 September 2015

Jørgen Dejgård Jensen, Anne Vibeke Thorsen, Camilla Trab Damsgaard and Anja Biltoft-Jensen

The purpose of this paper is to conduct economic evaluation of a school meal programme based on principles of a New Nordic Diet (NND) by assessing the costs of the NND lunch…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conduct economic evaluation of a school meal programme based on principles of a New Nordic Diet (NND) by assessing the costs of the NND lunch, compared with packed lunch from home, and investigating potential effects of adjusting the NND principles underlying the school meals on the costs and on the rate of food waste.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis combines recipes, dietary records and food waste data from a school meal intervention with collected price data within an economic optimization framework.

Findings

A New Nordic School meal programme consisting of a morning snack and a hot lunch based on fixed seasonal menu plans and with 75 per cent organic content is 37 per cent more expensive in terms of ingredient costs than corresponding packed school meals. This cost differential can be almost halved by introducing more flexible scheduling of week plans and reducing the level of organic ambition to 60 per cent. Reducing portion sizes could reduce the cost differential by an extra 5 per cent, which would also reduce food waste by about 15 per cent.

Originality/value

Higher costs and food waste in a restrictive ingredient sourcing school meal programme can be reduced by increased flexibility in meal scheduling, reduction in organic content and reduced average portion size.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 May 2023

Gervaise Debucquet, Mélanie Dugué and Mireille Cardinal

Collective catering sector is increasingly offering alternative and more sustainable food propositions, but their success rests on their reception by guests and changes induced in…

Abstract

Purpose

Collective catering sector is increasingly offering alternative and more sustainable food propositions, but their success rests on their reception by guests and changes induced in individual behaviors. The authors investigate food-change determinants by examining the relationship between food behavior at staff restaurants and at home.

Design/methodology/approach

In an experiment over four days conducted in three staff restaurants, the authors monitored the behavioral changes and motivations of guests (n = 599) offered choices between standard and sustainable options for meat, fish, dairy products, fruit-based desserts and a vegetarian dish. The calculation of a “sustainable consumption score,” based on actual consumption at a restaurant by a subsample (n = 160) of guests gives an indication of interest for sustainable options.

Findings

Higher overall choices were observed for vegetarian dishes and for the sustainable meat options rather than for the sustainable fish and desserts options, thus suggesting contrasted perceptions of the sustainable alternatives. The results revealed two profiles of consumers with contrasting scores. The “lower receptive guests” had lower commitment to sustainable food at home and at staff restaurants, while the “higher receptive guests” found in the intervention meaningful propositions for pursuing their existing at-home commitment.

Research limitations/implications

Long-term research would be required to verify whether repeated sustainable offers can break down deep-rooted choices and instill durable changes among consumers with lower commitment to sustainable food. This research contributes to the identification of some types of food that are more suitable for sustainable-oriented interventions.

Practical implications

Some food triggers are identified to further norm activation among the lower receptive profile of consumers.

Originality/value

By addressing continuities/discontinuities between at-home and at-restaurant consumption and mobilizing the “norm-activation” concept, the authors question the efficiency of sustainable food offers at work.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 125 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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