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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

Anne L. Barker

This paper compares and contrasts online searching on DataStar, a major European host now owned by The Dialog Corporation, using the “Classic” command language, with…

Abstract

This paper compares and contrasts online searching on DataStar, a major European host now owned by The Dialog Corporation, using the “Classic” command language, with access via the more recent Web interface. DataStar, established in 1981, was one of the first online hosts to offer a web interface, in December 1996. DataStar Web was upgraded in December 1997. “Classic” DataStar command line searching requires familiarity with commands, operators, database labels, etc. DataStar Web offers searching via apparently simple steps: eg. selecting a database, entering search terms. The functionality of the two interfaces is considered, looking in turn at entering the system, selecting a database, searching, output and display, terminating the search session, error messages and help pages, and support, training and documentation. The search functionality of the two interfaces is not identical, although both use the same retrieval software and access the same databases. Many of the differences affect retrieval effectiveness and may trip up novice and experienced searchers alike.

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Online and CD-Rom Review, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1353-2642

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1998

Ian Winship, Phil Bradley, Anne L Barker and David Salter

Lets start with the praise. In many ways this is an excellent book to give LIS professionals some essential background knowledge about the Net to help in using it and in…

Abstract

Lets start with the praise. In many ways this is an excellent book to give LIS professionals some essential background knowledge about the Net to help in using it and in advising others.

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Online and CD-Rom Review, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1353-2642

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Anne L Barker

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Library Management, vol. 21 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Library Management, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Library Management, vol. 20 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Library Management, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Book part
Publication date: 15 October 2013

Christine M. Proulx, Teresa M. Cooney, Jacqueline J. Benson and Linley A. Snyder-Rivas

Family members provide the bulk of care to persons in later life, representing the vast majority of caregivers. However, studies confirm that men with a history of divorce…

Abstract

Family members provide the bulk of care to persons in later life, representing the vast majority of caregivers. However, studies confirm that men with a history of divorce are less likely than married men to view family members as potential caregivers. This chapter presents findings from a qualitative study on the experiences of 21 ex-wives who chose to provide mostly end-of-life care to their ex-husbands in mid- and late-life. We examine questions about the situational and motivating factors behind ex-wife caregivers’ decisions, and provide, as background, findings about their pre- and post-divorce relationships. Relational outcomes of the caregiving situation also are considered. Several themes emerge, including patterns of proximity and continued contact post-divorce, despite often chaotic former marital relationships; a desire to spare children from the burdens of care; and an opportunity to renew communication or connections with family through the process of caregiving. Implications of our findings include the need to acknowledge ex-spouses as potential caregivers and better understand the enduring bonds between ex-spouses.

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Visions of the 21st Century Family: Transforming Structures and Identities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-028-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Jonathan C. Morris

Looks at the 2000 Employment Research Unit Annual Conference held at the University of Cardiff in Wales on 6/7 September 2000. Spotlights the 76 or so presentations within…

Abstract

Looks at the 2000 Employment Research Unit Annual Conference held at the University of Cardiff in Wales on 6/7 September 2000. Spotlights the 76 or so presentations within and shows that these are in many, differing, areas across management research from: retail finance; precarious jobs and decisions; methodological lessons from feminism; call centre experience and disability discrimination. These and all points east and west are covered and laid out in a simple, abstract style, including, where applicable, references, endnotes and bibliography in an easy‐to‐follow manner. Summarizes each paper and also gives conclusions where needed, in a comfortable modern format.

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Management Research News, vol. 23 no. 9/10/11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1936

THE central question of librarianship now and in the past is that which occupies some of our pages this month. Reading with purpose and with system, Matthew Arnold…

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THE central question of librarianship now and in the past is that which occupies some of our pages this month. Reading with purpose and with system, Matthew Arnold declared, was the last service to be rendered to education; and in various manner librarians and their committees have been endeavouring to do this for many years; it has indeed been a guiding principle of the best libraries that they presented to the community only good book's. Lately, however, more generous (or lax, according to the standpoint) ideas have been allowed to condition the admission of books; there are not wanting those who object to any exercise of judgment on the part of the librarian; if people want certain books they must be served, as they pay for them. This argument was exploded long ago, but its revival is justified if the librarians are unequal to their pretentions as guides to readers. And to be guides requires ever‐increasing knowledge, not only of all work done in bibliographies and reference books, but, as our writers indicate, of people and their manifold relations and reactions to books. This is enormously difficult in any community but is manifestly so in large cities. As a small illustration we may point to a librarian who, when a branch librarian was appointed to his staff, gave him a month of freedom from library work proper in which he was to walk every street of his branch area, interview the clergy, teachers, leading traders, and the secretaries and committees of local societies. He thus came to his work with at least an elementary notion of the community he had to serve. Such study must have its effect on book‐service; and this is the sort of study that must be pursued in the manner Dr. Waples has advocated and practiced (or some such manner) if we are to arrive at a science of book‐selection applicable to the areas a library serves.

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New Library World, vol. 38 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1936

SEPTEMBER this year will be unique in the history of the librarian in England in that for the first time in nearly sixty years the annual conference of the Library…

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SEPTEMBER this year will be unique in the history of the librarian in England in that for the first time in nearly sixty years the annual conference of the Library Association has already become a memory only. There are those who profess to believe that the conference should be restored to the autumn months. It may be suggested on the other hand that the attendance at Margate lent no assistance to that point of view; indeed, the Margate conference was one of the most pleasant, one of the most successful, of which we have record. Nevertheless, if it can be proved that any large body of librarians was unable to be present owing to the change of month, it appears to us that the matter should be considered sympathetically. Although no one holds any longer the view that one week's attendance at a conference will teach more than many months' study in hermit‐like seclusion—the words and sentiments are those of James Duff Brown—because to‐day there is much more intimate communication between librarians than there was when that sentiment was expressed, there is enormous value, and the adjective is not an exaggeration, in one large meeting of librarians in body in the year. It is an event to which every young librarian looks forward as the privilege to be his when he reaches a high enough position in the service; attendance is a privilege that no librarian anywhere would forego. And this, in spite of the fact that there is usually a grumble because the day is so full of meetings that there is very little chance of such recreation as a seaside, or indeed any other, place visited, usually provides for the delegates.

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New Library World, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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