Search results

1 – 10 of 202
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Richard Nurse, Kirsty Baker and Anne Gambles

Research at the Open University Library Services has been investigating the relationship between access to online library resources and student success. The purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

Research at the Open University Library Services has been investigating the relationship between access to online library resources and student success. The purpose of this study/paper is to help to understand whether there is a similar relationship at a distance-learning university to that found in other institutions.

Design/methodology/approach

A small library data project was established to investigate this area. The study analysed online library resource data from access logs from the EZproxy and OpenAthens systems. A data set of 1.7 million online resource accesses was combined with student success data for around 90,000 undergraduate students and a series of analyses undertaken.

Findings

The study found a pattern where students who are more successful are accessing more library resources. A chi-square test indicated a statistically significant association between library resource accesses and module result, while an ANOVA test suggests a medium-sized effect. The study also found that 152 (76 per cent) of the 199 modules had a small, medium or large positive correlation between student success, measured by the overall assessment score, and online library resource accesses.

Originality/value

This study builds on evidence that there is a relationship between library use and student success by showing that this relationship extends to the setting of a non-traditional, innovative library service supporting part-time distance learners.

Details

Information and Learning Science, vol. 119 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Sarah Jo Sandefur, Amye R. Warren and Anne Gamble

Project REEL (Resources for Early Educator Learning) was a quasi-experimental, delayed-treatment professional development (PD) design to provide training, coaching, and…

Abstract

Project REEL (Resources for Early Educator Learning) was a quasi-experimental, delayed-treatment professional development (PD) design to provide training, coaching, and materials to 220 early childhood educators (ECEs) in 85 diverse, high-needs settings (family, group, and center-based) across Tennessee. Its two primary goals were to (1) increase the frequency of research-based classroom learning experiences that promote language/literacy, numeracy, and social/emotional development among diverse early learners through training and coaching to ECEs and (2) improve the language/literacy, numeracy, and social/emotional readiness of children in low-income areas through research-based training of ECEs and parents. Even with differences in ECEs’ educational backgrounds and diverse settings, teachers in both treatment groups improved and maintained their knowledge and skills in response to the intervention. Preschool children in two cohorts showed significant improvements in most language and literacy measures over the course of an academic year, and improvements were often beyond that due to maturation (using age-controlled measures). Given the amount of improvement seen across a wide array of measures, there is substantial convergent evidence that the Project REEL PD approach was successful in promoting long-lasting improvements in the practices of ECEs in diverse settings and from diverse backgrounds. This chapter follows the development, implementation, and results of two literacy-related modules (“Print Awareness” and “Book Strategies”) for directors and teachers of three- and four-year-olds. These modules are representative of our training design, with its intensive focus on coaching in the diverse settings, and will provide the most beneficial model for other ECE professional developers to follow.

Details

The Early Childhood Educator Professional Development Grant: Research and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-280-8

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

The Early Childhood Educator Professional Development Grant: Research and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-280-8

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Maria Magdalena Aguilar-Crandall, Ed.D., is a librarian in the Brownsville Independent School District and an adjunct professor at Sam Houston State University.

Abstract

Maria Magdalena Aguilar-Crandall, Ed.D., is a librarian in the Brownsville Independent School District and an adjunct professor at Sam Houston State University.

Details

The Early Childhood Educator Professional Development Grant: Research and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-280-8

Content available
Article

Kalle Lind, Anne H. Salonen, Johanna Järvinen-Tassopoulos, Hannu Alho and Sari Castrén

The purpose of this paper is to explore the prevalence of potential problem gambling among Finnish prisoners; the associations between problem gambling and demographics…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the prevalence of potential problem gambling among Finnish prisoners; the associations between problem gambling and demographics, substance use and crime-related factors; and problem gamblers’ support preferences.

Design/methodology/approach

Prisoners (n=96) from two Finnish prisons were recruited between December 2017 and January 2018. The estimated response rate was 31 percent. Gambling problems were measured using the Brief Biosocial Gambling Screen. The participants were asked to report their gambling both for one year prior to their incarceration and for the past year. The independent variables were demographics (age, gender and marital status), substance use (alcohol, smoking and narcotics) and crime-related factors (crime type, prison type and previous sentence). Statistical significance (p) was determined using Fischer’s exact test.

Findings

Past-year pre-conviction problem gambling prevalence was 16.3 percent and past-year prevalence 15 percent. Age, gender, smoking, alcohol or illicit drug use were not associated with past-year problem gambling before sentencing. One-third of the prisoners (33.3 percent) who were sentenced for a property crime, financial crime or robbery were problem gamblers. One-quarter (24 percent) of all participants showed an interest in receiving support by identifying one or more support preferences. The most preferred type of support was group support in its all forms.

Research limitations/implications

It is recommended that correctional institutions undertake systematic screening for potential problem gambling, and implement tailored intervention programs for inmates with gambling problems.

Originality/value

This study provides a deeper understanding of problem gambling in prisons. Problem gambling is associated with crime and also seems to be linked with serving a previous sentence. Early detection and tailored interventions for problem gambling may help to reduce reoffending rates.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Paul Hugel and Joseph Kelly

Contrasts the approaches to offshore Internet gambling taken by the UK and the USA: the Budd Committee recommended that it be permissible under license in the former, but…

Abstract

Contrasts the approaches to offshore Internet gambling taken by the UK and the USA: the Budd Committee recommended that it be permissible under license in the former, but it is arguably illegal for an offshore operator to accept wagers from the USA ‐ and most gaming sites are well outside the USA. Discusses a number of US legal cases, many of them involving the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO): State of New Jersey v RoyalclubCasino.com et al, In Re Gaming Lottery Securities Litigation, Providian Bank v Haines, Jubilirer v MasterCard International, Reves v Ernst and Young, Marino v American Express, Buchal v 3748472 Canada Inc, US v Cohen, In Re MasterCard, US v Truesdale, US v Dennis and Joseph Atiyeh, United States v $734,578.82 in United States Currency. Suggests that the Statute of Anne might be used to minimise Internet gambling by Americans, but concludes that it is doubtful whether Internet gambling can be prohibited and that a licensing system may be practicable.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

William N. Thompson and R. Keith Schwer

This study seeks to find the dollar value of social costs of gambling. The authors use data from a survey of 99 members of Gamblers Anonymous (GA) groups in southern…

Abstract

This study seeks to find the dollar value of social costs of gambling. The authors use data from a survey of 99 members of Gamblers Anonymous (GA) groups in southern Nevada. The GA members were asked many questions about their behavior while they were active gamblers, such as how often they missed work because of gambling, how much they borrowed because of gambling, how much they stole because of gambling and their experiences with the judicial system and welfare systems because of gambling. Societal costs of each behavior were calculated and annualized. It was determined that each of the compulsive gamblers imposed social costs of $19,711 on others in southern Nevada. Of these costs, $1,428 (7.2%) were governmental costs, while $6,616 (33.6%) represented economic losses for southern Nevada. Using estimates of the numbers of pathological and problem gamblers in Nevada, it was determined that the overall social costs of compulsive and problem gambling in southern Nevada ranged from $314 million to $545 million per year.

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Shankar Sankaran, Anne Live Vaagaasar and Michiel Christian Bekker

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how project managers, influence the assignment of project team members by directly assigning or specifying who they want or by…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how project managers, influence the assignment of project team members by directly assigning or specifying who they want or by indirectly using lateral influence strategies to secure the appropriate resources. This study is part of a wider study investigating the balance between vertical and horizontal leadership in projects in which nomination (or assignment) was identified as a key event contributing to balancing the leadership. It focuses specifically on the nomination or assignment event at the start of a project.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the philosophy of critical realism, case studies were used to collect data through 70 semi-structured interviews in Australia, Scandinavia and South Africa. Interviews were conducted with senior managers, project managers and project team members. Two project team members who worked with the same project manager were interviewed to gather diverse views. The data were analyzed individually by researchers from each location using a coding method proposed by Miles et al. (2014). The researchers then jointly analyzed the findings to arrive at five common themes from that explained how team members were assigned in practice.

Findings

Despite the recognized need for project managers to form their own teams, this study found that project team members were often assigned by others. This was because project managers lacked authority to secure their resources. Therefore, they used lateral influence strategies to help with assigning project team members. The study identified five lateral influencing strategies adopted by project managers to assign team members: creating an image of competence; creating coalitions; taking a gamble; waiting for the right moment; and reasoning with facts. Two of these lateral influencing strategies were not identified in the previous literature on influencing strategies used in organizations.

Research limitations/implications

The findings should not be viewed as representative of the respective continents where the cases were studied. However, this study contributes to the literature on project management, illuminating how project teams are assigned and by whom and, specifically, the role that influence plays during this event of the balanced leadership theory. It also identifies the types of lateral influence strategies used by project managers when assigning team members to their projects. It provides a pathway to explore the use of lateral influencing strategies by project managers beyond the assignment process.

Practical implications

This study will help project managers to become aware of influencing strategies that they can use in practice while assigning team members to their projects. It will also highlight the importance of assigning the right resources to projects with a view to achieving balanced leadership.

Originality/value

This research is of value to organizations using projects to successfully deliver their strategies by assigning suitable resources to their projects.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Elsa Kassardjian, Joanna Gamble, Anne Gunson and Sara R. Jaeger

The goal of this research was to try a new methodology to elicit consumers' willingness to pay for genetically modified (GM) food.

Abstract

Purpose

The goal of this research was to try a new methodology to elicit consumers' willingness to pay for genetically modified (GM) food.

Design/methodology/approach

Even though experimental auctions have been used for several years, they do not provide qualitative information on consumers' reasoning behind their purchase behaviours. To provide further illumination in this regard, a thought‐listing technique and a questionnaire were added.

Findings

A majority of the consumers involved in this study were ready to pay for the GM food offered. The benefit provided by the GM product did not seem to be the major purchase criterion and sensory assessment appeared to be important. The use of different methodologies on the same sample of participants revealed that there was a gap between purchasing intentions and behaviours, and that a key to efficiently assessing public perception and purchase behaviours is the precision of the context.

Research limitations implications

The absence of discrimination between the different benefits offered, might come from the limited size of the samples or from the nature of the benefits offered. Future research should consider larger samples and more diversified products.

Practical implications

This study has concrete methodology applications. If one would like to conduct a market study, for instance, on a specific GM product, a general survey on biotechnology will not provide relevant answers.

Originality/value

The implementation of experimental auctions with psychometric tools, created an original and suitable protocol for accessing consumers' willingness to pay as well as their justifications.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 107 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

1 – 10 of 202