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Article
Publication date: 17 October 2018

May-Kristin Vespestad and Anne Clancy

The purpose of this study is to explore perceptions of successful collaboration by a group of professionals in primary health care, using service-dominant logic (SDL) as a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore perceptions of successful collaboration by a group of professionals in primary health care, using service-dominant logic (SDL) as a theoretical framework.

Design/methodology/approach

This study carries out secondary analysis of the results from a Norwegian national survey on collaboration amongst professionals in primary health care services.

Findings

Findings illustrate that SDL can provide a theoretical framework for understanding health and social care services. The study provides evidence for the relevance of the theory at micro level. Viewing primary care through the lens of SDL enables an understanding of the applicability of market principles to health and social care. The study illustrates the relevance of the following principles: services are the fundamental basis of exchange; indirect exchange can mask the fundamental basis of exchange. Operant resources are the fundamental source of strategic benefit; actors cannot deliver value but can participate in the creation and offering of value propositions.

Social implications

Awareness of the use of SDL in health care services can be positive for service provision and it could be incorporated as a supplementary perspective in educational programs for health care professionals.

Originality/value

Applying principles from SDL as a theoretical framework for primary care services challenges the conventional understanding of marketing in health services. This paper responds to the need for a more in-depth understanding of how SDL can help health care professionals recognize their role as participants in providing seamless health care at micro level.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

Keywords

Open Access
Book part
Publication date: 6 May 2019

Mitch Blair, Heather Gage, Ekelechi MacPepple, Pierre-André Michaud, Carol Hilliard, Anne Clancy, Eleanor Hollywood, Maria Brenner, Amina Al-Yassin and Catharina Nitsche

Given that the workforce constitutes a principal resource of primary care, appraisal of models of care requires thorough investigation of the health workforce in all…

Abstract

Given that the workforce constitutes a principal resource of primary care, appraisal of models of care requires thorough investigation of the health workforce in all Models of Child Health Appraised (MOCHA) countries. This chapter explores this in terms of workforce composition, remuneration, qualifications and training in relation to the needs of children and young people. We have focused on two principal disciplines of primary care; medicine and nursing, with a specific focus on training and skills to care for children in primary care, particularly those with complex care needs, adolescents and vulnerable groups. We found significant disparities in workforce provision and remuneration, in training curricula and in resultant skills of physicians and nurses in European Union and European Economic Area Countries. A lack of overarching standards and recognition of some of the specific needs of children reflected in training of physicians and nurses may lead to suboptimal care for children. There are, of course, many other professions that also contribute to primary care services for children, some of which are discussed in Chapter 15, but we have not had resources to study these to the same detail.

Details

Issues and Opportunities in Primary Health Care for Children in Europe
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-354-9

Keywords

Open Access
Book part
Publication date: 6 May 2019

Maria Brenner, Miriam O’Shea, Anne Clancy, Stine Lundstroem Kamionka, Philip Larkin, Sapfo Lignou, Daniela Luzi, Elena Montañana Olaso, Manna Alma, Fabrizio Pecoraro, Rose Satherley, Oscar Tamburis, Keishia Taylor, Austin Warters, Ingrid Wolfe, Jay Berry, Colman Noctor and Carol Hilliard

Improvements in neonatal and paediatric care mean that many children with complex care needs (CCNs) now survive into adulthood. This cohort of children places great…

Abstract

Improvements in neonatal and paediatric care mean that many children with complex care needs (CCNs) now survive into adulthood. This cohort of children places great challenges on health and social care delivery in the community: they require dynamic and responsive health and social care over a long period of time; they require organisational and delivery coordination functions; and health issues such as minor illnesses, normally presented to primary care, must be addressed in the context of the complex health issues. Their clinical presentation may challenge local care management. The project explored the interface between primary care and specialised health services and found that it is not easily navigated by children with CCNs and their families across the European Union and the European Economic Area countries. We described the referral-discharge interface, the management of a child with CCNs at the acute–community interface, social care, nursing preparedness for practice and the experiences of the child and family in all Models of Child Health Appraised countries. We investigated data integration and the presence of validated standards of care, including governance and co-creation of care. A separate enquiry was conducted into how care is accessed for children with enduring mental health disorders. This included the level of parental involvement and the presence of multidisciplinary teams in their care. For all children with CCNs, we found wide variation in access to, and governance of, care. Effective communication between the child, family and health services remains challenging, often with fragmentation of care delivery across the health and social care sector and limited service availability.

Details

Issues and Opportunities in Primary Health Care for Children in Europe
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-354-9

Keywords

Open Access
Book part
Publication date: 6 May 2019

Abstract

Details

Issues and Opportunities in Primary Health Care for Children in Europe
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-354-9

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

Lorre Smith

52

Abstract

Details

Electronic Resources Review, vol. 4 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1364-5137

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Craig Henry

164

Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Open Access
Book part
Publication date: 6 May 2019

Abstract

Details

Issues and Opportunities in Primary Health Care for Children in Europe
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-354-9

Article
Publication date: 31 May 2022

Joyce Hei Tong Lau, Huda Khan, Richard Lee, Larry S. Lockshin, Anne Sharp, Jonathan Buckley and Ryan Midgley

Obesity among elderly consumers precipitates undesirable health outcomes. This study aims to investigate the effects of environmental cues on food intake of elderly…

Abstract

Purpose

Obesity among elderly consumers precipitates undesirable health outcomes. This study aims to investigate the effects of environmental cues on food intake of elderly consumers in an aged-care facility.

Design/methodology/approach

A longitudinal study conducted over 17 weeks in situ within an aged-care facility with 31 residents investigated how auditory (soothing music), olfactory (floral-scented candle) and visual (infographic on health benefits of the main meal component) cues influenced food intake quantity during a meal, while accounting for portion size effect (PSE).

Findings

Analysing the cross-sectional results of individual treatments and rounds did not reveal any consistent patterns in the influence of the three environmental cues. Longitudinal analyses, however, showed that the presence of auditory and olfactory cues significantly increased food intake, but the visual cue did not. Moreover, PSE was strong.

Research limitations/implications

Extending research into environmental factors from a commercial to a health-care setting, this study demonstrates how the presence of auditory and olfactory, but not cognitive cues, increased food intake behaviour among elderly consumers. It also shows that a cross-sectional approach to such studies would have yielded inconclusive or even misleading findings. Merely serving more would also lead to higher food intake amount.

Practical implications

Environmental factors should be a part of health-care providers’ arsenal to manage obesity. They are practical and relatively inexpensive to implement across different health-care settings. However, the same environmental factors would have opposite desired-effects with normal or underweight residents, and hence, aged-care facilities need to separate the dining experience (or mealtime) of obese and other residents. Quantity served should also be moderated to discourage overeating.

Originality/value

While studies into managing obesity, particularly among older adults, have mainly focused on techniques such as pharmacotherapy treatments with drugs, dietary management or even lifestyle change, less attention has been given to the influence of environmental cues. This study, executed in situ within an aged-care facility, provided evidence of the importance of considering the impact of environmental factors on food intake to help reduce obesity.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 18 April 2018

Mai-Stiina Lampinen, Anne Irmeli Konu, Tarja Kettunen and Elina Annikki Suutala

The purpose of this study is to identify factors that foster or prevent sense of belonging among frontline and middle managers in social and health-care services in Finland.

9917

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identify factors that foster or prevent sense of belonging among frontline and middle managers in social and health-care services in Finland.

Design/methodology/approach

The data have been collected among social and health-care managers (n = 135; 64 per cent nursing managers) through two open-ended questions in a questionnaire concerning sense of community. The results of the open-ended questions have been analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

Findings

Among managers, six categories of factors that foster sense of belonging (open interaction, effective conversation culture, support and encouragement, common values, a shared vision of the work and its objectives and structure of leadership) and five categories of factors that prevent sense of belonging (negative work atmosphere, lack of common time, structural solutions in the organization, problems that occur in the organizational level and problems related to leadership and management) have been identified.

Practical implications

The resulting information can be used to develop sense of belonging among managers at all levels of organization (horizontal and vertical).

Originality/value

Paying attention to the quantity and quality of interaction and to structural solutions in the organization can affect the sense of belonging among frontline managers and middle managers.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 May 2011

Stephen Brown

The literary world is an elitist enclave, where anti‐marketing rhetoric is regularly encountered. This paper aims to show that the book trade has always been hard‐nosed…

3601

Abstract

Purpose

The literary world is an elitist enclave, where anti‐marketing rhetoric is regularly encountered. This paper aims to show that the book trade has always been hard‐nosed and commercially driven.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is less a review of the literature, or a theoretical treatise, than a selective revelation of the commercial realities of the book business.

Findings

The paper shows that the cultural industries in general and the book business in particular were crucibles of marketing practice long before learned scholars started taking notice. It highlights the importance of luck, perseverance and, not least, marketing nous in the “manufacture” of international bestsellers.

Research limitations/implications

By highlighting humankind's deep‐seated love of narrative – its clear preference for fiction over fact – this paper suggests that marketing scholars should reconsider their preferred mode of research representation. Hard facts are all very well, but they are less palatable than good stories, well told.

Originality/value

The paper makes no claim to originality. It recovers what we already know but appear to have forgotten in our non‐stop pursuit of scientific respectability.

Details

Arts Marketing: An International Journal, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-2084

Keywords

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