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Article
Publication date: 3 February 2021

Sophie R. Homer, Linda Solbrig, Despina Djama, Anne Bentley, Sarah Kearns and Jon May

Rates of mental ill-health among postgraduate research students (PGRs) are alarmingly high. PGRs face unique challenges and stigma around accessing support. The purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

Rates of mental ill-health among postgraduate research students (PGRs) are alarmingly high. PGRs face unique challenges and stigma around accessing support. The purpose of this paper is to introduce The Researcher Toolkit: a novel, open-source, preventative approach to PGR mental health. The Toolkit empowers PGRs and promotes positive research culture. This paper describes and evaluates the Toolkit to encourage adoption across the sector.

Design/methodology/approach

Four workshops were designed by integrating researcher development, critical pedagogy and psychological knowledge of well-being. A diverse group of PGRs co-designed workshops and delivered them to their peers. Workshops engaged 26% of the PGR population (total 116 attendees). PGR Workshop Leaders and attendees submitted anonymous, online feedback after workshops (74 total responses). A mixed-method approach combined quantitative analysis of ratings and qualitative analysis of open-ended comments.

Findings

Feedback was overwhelmingly positive. Workshops were universally appealing, enjoyable and beneficial and the peer-support approach was highly valued, strongly supporting adoption of the programme in other universities. Findings are discussed alongside wider systemic factors and recommendations for policy.

Practical implications

The Toolkit translates readily to other UK institutions and can be adapted for use elsewhere. Recommendations for practice are provided.

Originality/value

The Researcher Toolkit is a novel PGR well-being initiative. Its originality is threefold: its approach is prevention rather than intervention; its content is new and bespoke, created through interdisciplinary collaboration between psychologists, researcher development professionals and PGR stakeholders; and support is peer-led and decentralised from student support services. Its evaluation adds to the limited literature on PGR well-being and peer-support.

Details

Studies in Graduate and Postdoctoral Education, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4686

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 17 February 2020

Felicity T. C. Hamer

Abstract

Details

Parental Grief and Photographic Remembrance: A Historical Account of Undying Love
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-326-5

Abstract

Details

Fostering Productivity: Patterns, Determinants and Policy Implications
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-840-7

Article
Publication date: 28 October 2020

Abel Duarte Alonso, Seng Kok and Jeremy Galbreath

The purpose of this study is to investigate about women involved in the wine industry of emerging economies, including their journey, perceived progression in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate about women involved in the wine industry of emerging economies, including their journey, perceived progression in the industry, their impact and required characteristics to adapt to this industry. Because of its significance in the context of this research, social cognitive theory (SCT) will be adopted.

Design/methodology/approach

Face-to-face, in-depth on-site interviews were conducted with 15 female winery owners and managers in three separate South American wine regions.

Findings

While overall participants recognised persistent barriers for women to work in the wine industry, they also acknowledged increased opportunities for females, which have led to stronger roles for women. Importantly, sensitivity, by being detail-oriented in service encounters while practicing subtlety in winemaking, was revealed as a key differentiating trait. Further, fundamental tenets of SCT, particularly self-efficacy, became apparent when participants reflected on their own journeys, as well as on how future female entrants could successfully adapt to the wine industry.

Originality/value

The study draws on SCT’s underpinnings to examine an under-researched area, notably, the journey of entrepreneurial women in the wine industry of emerging economies. Apart from the gathered empirical evidence concerning such a journey, a proposed framework extends SCT, thereby highlighting the role of self-efficacy, a determinant factor in enhancing women’s presence and involvement in the wine industry. This presence is closely linked to women’s progression and journey in the industry, where determination contributes to their adaptation, learning and accumulation of knowledge, with important implications for their future and the future of other female entrants.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 28 July 2008

Abstract

Details

Advances in Accounting Behavioral Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84663-961-6

Article
Publication date: 27 December 2021

Julia Richardson, Deborah Anne O'Neil and Kaye Thorn

In this paper, the authors investigate and celebrate the contributions that qualitative research has made to Career Development International (CDI) and careers scholarship…

Abstract

Purpose

In this paper, the authors investigate and celebrate the contributions that qualitative research has made to Career Development International (CDI) and careers scholarship over the past 25 years. The authors highlight the positive impact of understanding the “lived/emic experiences” of individual career actors using qualitative research designs and identify areas for future research.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors employ multiple approaches in their investigation. The authors’ enquiry is part conceptual, part critical analysis and part bibliometric visualisation of qualitative papers published in CDI.

Findings

The authors identify the underlying ontological and epistemological assumptions of qualitative research, and the key tenets and contributions of qualitative research published in CDI. Their bibliometric analysis shows the interrelatedness and frequency of topics addressed by qualitative research and published in CDI, revealing areas for further research. While identifying some of the key criteria for rigor in qualitative research, the authors also engage with emerging calls to avoid rigid templates in how qualitative research is designed and implemented. In this regard, authors echo calls for “methodological bricolage” as an approach to qualitative research in the study of careers.

Originality/value

This is the first bibliographic and visual analysis of qualitative research published in a single journal. The authors offer this investigation as a way of looking back and as an invitation looking forward, encouraging further qualitative research in anticipation of future theoretical developments in career scholarship.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2014

Abstract

Details

Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-851-8

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 28 July 2008

Abstract

Details

Advances in Accounting Behavioral Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84663-961-6

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 24 August 2011

Abstract

Details

Advances in Accounting Behavioral Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-086-5

Article
Publication date: 9 August 2013

Lynda Holyoak

Internships are becoming a more common feature of the career paths of young people, however there has been little consideration of how people learn on internships. The…

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Abstract

Purpose

Internships are becoming a more common feature of the career paths of young people, however there has been little consideration of how people learn on internships. The purpose of this paper is report on the experiences of interns and their supervisors on a research internship programme.

Design/methodology/approach

This study analyses the experiences of interns and their supervisors on a research internship programme, using communities of practice as a theoretical framework. In total, six interns and six supervisors were interviewed approximately six to eight months after the internships were completed.

Findings

Extreme types of experience in the internships are illustrated by four cases derived from the interviews: optimal conditions for development; intern non‐development; supervisor frustration; and mutual dissatisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

Although the research is exploratory and limited to the experience of a small group of interns and their supervisors in one setting, it suggests that characteristics of the intern (such as motivation to learn) and the supervisor (e.g. willingness to provide support) can reduce or enhance the learning and development that is achieved during internships.

Originality/value

This paper questions implicit assumptions that internships are always positive and valuable learning experiences.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 55 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

1 – 10 of 145