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Article
Publication date: 11 August 2022

Mark Loughhead, Ellie Hodges, Heather McIntyre, Nicholas Gerard Procter, Anne Barbara, Brooke Bickley, Geoff Harris, Lisa Huber and Lee Martinez

This discursive paper presents a lived experience leadership model as developed as part of the Activating Lived Experience Leadership (ALEL) project to increase the…

Abstract

Purpose

This discursive paper presents a lived experience leadership model as developed as part of the Activating Lived Experience Leadership (ALEL) project to increase the recognition and understanding of lived experience leadership in mental health and social sectors. The model of lived experience leadership was formulated through a collaboration between the South Australian Lived Experience Leadership & Advocacy Network and the Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Research and Education Group.

Design/methodology/approach

As one of the outcomes of the ALEL research project, this model incorporates findings from a two-year research project in South Australia using participatory action research methodology and cocreation methodology. Focus groups with lived experience leaders, interviews with sector leaders and a national survey of lived experience leaders provided the basis of qualitative data, which was interpreted via an iterative and shared analysis. This work identified intersecting lived experience values, actions, qualities and skills as characteristics of effective lived experience leadership and was visioned and led by lived experience leaders.

Findings

The resulting model frames lived experience leadership as a social movement for recognition, inclusion and justice and is composed of six leadership actions: centres lived experience; stands up and speaks out; champions justice; nurtures connected and collective spaces; mobilises strategically; and leads change. Leadership is also guided by the values of integrity, authenticity, mutuality and intersectionality, and the key positionings of staying peer and sharing power.

Originality/value

This model is based on innovative primary research, which has been developed to encourage understanding across mental health and social sectors on the work of lived experience leaders in seeking change and the value that they offer for systems transformation. It also offers unique insights to guide reflective learning for the lived experience and consumer movement, workers, clinicians, policymakers and communities.

Article
Publication date: 2 September 2020

Anne Barbara Bottomley

This paper aims to investigate the potential of the “image-idea” of a “circular economy” for re-thinking property in law: In particular, to develop a strategy for making…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the potential of the “image-idea” of a “circular economy” for re-thinking property in law: In particular, to develop a strategy for making visible “alternative property practices” of community ownership across the subject areas of business and property law, to enhance the visibility of models of community ownership and interrogate their potential.

Design/methodology/approach

Case study research was undertaken into three public houses to investigate the ways in which the orthodoxies of property and ownership in the academy are challenged by evidence of “alternative property practices” in the community.

Findings

Using this approach renders visible tensions between the logics of economic value and social asset, carried in processes of abstraction and materiality, and mediated within the field of property by the development of techniques for holding property as title and benefit. It reveals the ways in which “property” as idea, practice and technique is used by people seeking to disrupt or defend against the economic logic of profit and investment. It raises questions concerning how property and law is imaged in the academy and it introduces one way of using an image-idea to open new perspectives and potential.

Research limitations/implications

These implications emerge: the partiality of orthodox accounts of property; the importance of thinking property in terms of life-cycle and logics ecologies, field and techniques; how an model-theory derived from one discipline can be repurposed, in a second life, in an other discipline as an “image-idea” to refresh the host discipline; the significance of investigating “community assets” within and for property law and the need for more research into “alternative property practices” and the importance of case studies.

Practical implications

An enhanced knowledge of the development and potential of “community assets” within the academy, and of the potential to promote and support “alternative property practices” with the requisite legal skills and techniques – alongside a consideration of the limits of formal law in terms of policy expectations.

Social implications

The research is of value to community activists in thinking how law can be used to support community development in terms of holding community assets; and the limitations of formal law which then requires an embedded approach considering how the development of practices and narratives can support community initiatives in relation to property held for community benefit.

Originality/value

There has been very little coverage of “community assets” within legal research, especially moving across business and property as subject areas, and no coverage on public houses taken into community ownership. This paper combines an introduction to the relevant legal forms with a consideration of the use of them in practice: considering, in particular, how practices and narratives deployed by and within the community think and present “property” as a means by which to counter the economic logic of profit. All this is made possible through the use of case-studies made visible by the utilization of the image-idea of the circular economy – used here not as a model-theory, but rather as an aid to opening thinking into new territories accessed through new perspectives.

Details

Journal of Property, Planning and Environmental Law, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9407

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 September 2013

Barbara Anne Sen and Hannah Spring

– The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between information and coping from the experiences of young people coping with long term illness.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between information and coping from the experiences of young people coping with long term illness.

Design/methodology/approach

Situational analysis was used as a methodological approach. It has roots in the Chicago Symbolic Interactionism School. Cartographic approaches enabled the analysis, mapping the complexities emerging from the data.

Findings

As the young people became more informed about their health conditions, and gained knowledge and understanding both about their illnesses, their own bodies and boundaries, their confidence and capacity to cope increased. Gaining confidence, the young people often wanted to share their knowledge – becoming information providers themselves. From the data, five positions on an information-coping trajectory were identified: information deficiency; feeling ill-informed; needing an injection of information; having information health; and becoming an information donor.

Research limitations/implications

The research was limited to an analysis of 30 narratives. The paper contributes to information theory by mapping clearly the relationship between information and coping.

Practical and social implications

The study establishes a relationship between levels of information and knowledge and the ability to cope with illness.

Originality/value

The information theories in this study have originality and multi-disciplinary value in the management of health and illness, and information studies.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 69 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 August 2018

Ulrica Nylén

This paper investigates the prospects and difficulties of multi-professional teamwork in human services from a professional identity perspective. The purpose of this paper…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper investigates the prospects and difficulties of multi-professional teamwork in human services from a professional identity perspective. The purpose of this paper is to explore the mutual interplay between professional identity formation and team activities.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a process study of two cases of multi-professional teamwork in family care. Data were collected through in-depth interviews with team members and managers. The analysis follows a stepwise approach alternating between the individual and team levels.

Findings

In showing the mutual interplay between teamwork processes and individual identity formation, the study contributes knowledge on professional identity formation of mature professionals; in particular showing how unique individual identification processes have different consequences for multi-professional team activities. Further, alternative shapes of interplay between individual identity formation and team-level processes are identified.

Research limitations/implications

Despite the fact that the sample is small and that collaboration intensity was relatively low, the paper succeeds in conceptualising the links between professional identity formation and multi-professional teamwork.

Practical implications

In managing multi-professional teams, team composition and the team’s early developments seem determining for whether the team will reach its collaborative intentions.

Originality/value

This paper is original in its exploration of the ongoing interplay between individual identity formation and multi-professional team endeavours. Further, the paper contributes knowledge on mature professionals’ identity formation, particularly concerning individual variation within and between professional groups.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

New Library World, vol. 102 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 28 February 2019

Caroline Simon, Barbara Truffin and Anne Wyvekens

Based on extensive empirical fieldworks conducted in Belgian and French family justice courtrooms in order to explain how culture and ethnicity are processed and…

Abstract

Based on extensive empirical fieldworks conducted in Belgian and French family justice courtrooms in order to explain how culture and ethnicity are processed and understood in the daily reasoning and assumptions of legal professionals, this chapter analyzes different forms in which culture and ethnicity are framed in family law cases. Understanding how and along which dimensions these elements do vary in judicial reasoning constitutes the preliminary but necessary step before assessing the need of cultural expertise as such. In this attempt, we shed light on a scope of variations between complex and non-deterministic models of culture – consistent with contemporary anthropology literature – and more simplistic ones, in which culture and identity are conceived as fixed realities. Throughout this path between norms, facts, and stereotypes, we illustrate not only the multiplicity and complexity of forms which cultural elements can take in the exercise of family justice, but also the risks that some significances may carry with them and the urgent need to improve more fluid and dispassionate conceptions of cultural diversity before developing “cultural expertise” as such, an expertise that could otherwise reinforce stereotypical and fixed views of “cultures.”

Details

Cultural Expertise and Socio-Legal Studies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-515-3

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 January 2010

Barbara Anne Sen

The purpose of this paper is to analyze students' reflective writing in terms of identifiable outcomes and explore students' thoughts on reflection and reflective writing…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze students' reflective writing in terms of identifiable outcomes and explore students' thoughts on reflection and reflective writing as a process.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed methods approach is taken with a qualitative analysis of 116 written reflections from MA Librarianship studying management over an eight‐month period. A quantitative statistical analysis assesses the relationships between reflective writing and a number of possible outcomes identified from the literature.

Findings

A significant relationship is found between seven of eight outcomes tested; academic learning, the need for self‐development, actual self‐development, critical review, awareness of ones' own mental functions, decision making and empowerment and emancipation. There is some evidence of a relationship between non‐academic learning and reflective writing, but it is not significant. A number of themes emerged from the reflective writings regarding reflection itself, with students seeing reflection as a positive activity, with benefits for the individual, groups and in the workplace, and identifying reflection as a skill that can be practiced and developed.

Practical implications

Reflection and reflective writing as a management skill has potential benefits for personal and professional development and improving work‐based practice.

Originality/value

This paper differs from the previous literature in presenting statistical evidence to confirm the relationships between reflective writing and a range of potential outcomes.

Details

Library Management, vol. 31 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Alice E Schofield, Barbara Anne Sen and Ana C Vasconcelos

– The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the intellectual assets within the Scholarship and Collections directorate at the British Library.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the intellectual assets within the Scholarship and Collections directorate at the British Library.

Design/methodology/approach

A phenomenographic approach is used gathering data via 25 in depth interviews with directorate staff and stakeholders complemented by document analysis.

Findings

The findings identified issues specific to British Library such as the need for more clearly definitions of key business areas, and untapped resources within the directorate.

Research limitations/implications

This study was limited to a single directorate within the British Library. From the findings a balanced scorecard was developed for the directorate adaptable for all departments within the directorate. The model could be adapted for other organisations.

Practical implications

The study illustrates the value of adaptable scorecards allowing individual key performance indicators (KPIs) to be tailored to suit each department’s needs and ensure equal representation. Using the model would allow for internal benchmarking to take place.

Originality/value

This research presents a scorecard model that allows intellectual assets to be considered alongside traditional performance indicators and acknowledge the value of intellectual assets within the organisation.

Details

Library Management, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 August 2014

Barbara Anne Ritter, Srinivasan Venkatraman and Carrie Schlauch

The purpose of this paper is to empirically explore the underlying mechanisms through which empowerment affects organizational outcomes via a multi-dimensional model…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically explore the underlying mechanisms through which empowerment affects organizational outcomes via a multi-dimensional model. Specifically, the paper suggests that empowerment climate (EC) is positively related to psychological empowerment (PE) and the effect of PE on the outcome variable of job satisfaction is mediated by justice perceptions and role clarity.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 765 employees at the executive level across 26 distinct groups in a large manufacturing firm participated in the survey. Multi-level analyses based on both hierarchical linear modeling and multi-level structural equation modeling techniques were utilized to test the hypotheses.

Findings

This research demonstrated that EC significantly affected PE and that perceptions of justice and role clarity mediated the relationship between PE and job satisfaction. Additional analyses demonstrated that EC did not significantly affect organizational outcomes above and beyond PE, justice, and role clarity.

Practical implications

The current study suggests that managers concerned with increasing employee perceptions of justice may be able to do so by increasing perceptions of employee empowerment. As only individual employee perceptions of empowerment related directly to organizational outcomes, this demonstrates the importance for managers to understand perceptions of employees.

Originality/value

Exploring these mechanisms will strengthen the knowledge regarding how empowerment works to enhance organizational effectiveness. This will enable practitioners to better determine how and when empowerment will be most effective.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 35 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 22 May 2013

Barbara McClanahan and Anne Stojke

Purpose – Describes the various ways mobile devices are becoming part of the 21st century classroom and how best practices of reading instruction are applied to the use of…

Abstract

Purpose – Describes the various ways mobile devices are becoming part of the 21st century classroom and how best practices of reading instruction are applied to the use of these devices to support struggling readers.Design/methodology/approach – Situates mobile devices within the framework of other information and communication technologies (ICTs), especially as related to struggling readers. Following that discussion, uses of various mobile devices are addressed based on the learning/reading task rather than a specific device.Findings – Uses of mobile devices in the classroom often build on or simply “digitize” traditional reading/learning strategies. Other implementations of the devices can take students beyond such basic approaches to engage them in multimedia and New Literacies to create their own texts and multimedia projects that enhance reading skills rather than just consume them.Research limitations/implications – The field of mobile devices in the classroom is quite new and extremely fluid. It is certain that there are other great applications and strategies being implemented in schools all over the world. More research to gain further understandings is needed.Practical implications – While obviously not exhaustive, this chapter offers instructors and researchers an opportunity to become aware of the issues related to mobile devices in the classroom and to launch their own exploration of this field.Originality/value of paper – It is hoped that instructors and researchers will be inspired to try out some of the strategies and/or devices discussed and find even more inventive ways to positively impact learning for their students.

Details

School-Based Interventions for Struggling Readers, K-8
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-696-5

Keywords

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