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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2017

Lynn Carol Cuddihy and Anna Waugh

The purpose of this paper is to critically examine school teachers’ experiences and beliefs regarding parenting and infant mental health (IMH) promotion, starting with the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to critically examine school teachers’ experiences and beliefs regarding parenting and infant mental health (IMH) promotion, starting with the research question: How do teachers in two secondary schools view their roles regarding parenting and IMH promotion?

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative, exploratory focus groups were used with two groups of teachers that delivered personal social education (PSE) in schools.

Findings

Teachers currently have varying roles in PSE delivery. Interaction within focus groups can generate changes of opinions. Teachers do not promote parenting and IMH but are keen for support and training to do so to enable them to benefit future parents.

Research limitations/implications

This was a small-scale study. There was limited breadth of knowledge and experience of participants. The study highlights the need for further research and support and training for school-based staff in parenting promotion.

Social implications

The significance of parenting and IMH is well evidenced by theory, practice and policies. A potential strategy to prevent child developmental difficulties is to educate young people about parenting and IMH before they become parents.

Originality/value

No similar research was found in this area at the time of the study.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 May 2020

Louise Ritchie, Anna Jack-Waugh, Elsa Sanatombi Devi, Binil V, Anice George, Joyce Henry, Clarita Shynal Martis, Debjani Gangopadhyay and Debbie Tolson

Many individual and family hardships are associated with poorly understood palliative care needs arising from advanced dementia within India. The purpose of this paper is…

Abstract

Purpose

Many individual and family hardships are associated with poorly understood palliative care needs arising from advanced dementia within India. The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of people in India affected by advanced dementia and to shape educational approaches for practitioners and the local community.

Design/methodology/approach

Three focus groups with family carers of people (n = 27) with advanced dementia were undertaken with local communities in South India. One focus group was carried out in English and two in the local language (Kannada) and translated to English.

Findings

The findings of the focus groups are presented in four themes, conditions of caring, intersecting vulnerabilities, desperate acts of care and awareness of education and training needs. These themes highlight the challenges faced by family carers of people with advanced dementia and describe the potential harm, abuse and poor mental well-being facing both the person with dementia and the family carer as a result of their situation.

Research limitations/implications

There is a need to explore ways to ensure inclusivity and sensitivity in the research process and enable equal participation from all participants.

Practical implications

The findings highlight a lack of support for family carers of people with advanced dementia and demonstrate the need for dementia-specific integrated and palliative care approaches in India.

Originality/value

This paper provides insight into the experiences and challenges facing family caregivers of people living with advanced dementia in India to shape practitioner education in a way that will underpin effective dementia-specific palliation and integrated services.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2012

Marie McCaig, Anna Waugh, Tim Duffy and Colin R. Martin

Little is known about the lived experience of the older user of assistive technology. The aim of the investigation is to gain an appreciation of the experience of…

Abstract

Purpose

Little is known about the lived experience of the older user of assistive technology. The aim of the investigation is to gain an appreciation of the experience of assistive technology (AT) in older people.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative phenomenology was conducted on individual interviews undertaken using a Husserlian phenomenological approach. The participants were six individuals, >65 years who all lived in supported housing.

Findings

Six key themes emerged from interviews: being unsure; being old; being a bother; being on my own; being neighbourly and being independent.

Social implications

Reactions to assistive technology are highly individualised and salient. In order to humanise the technology it is necessary to understand the person who is using it. Further research in this area is a priority as AT evolves and matures.

Originality/value

This study offers a novel insight into a neglected but important area of concern for older people.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2019

Grzegorz Kunikowski, Anna Kosieradzka and Urszula Kąkol

The purpose of this paper is to present a proposal for the methodology of developing rescue plans and the concepts of applying recommended response schedules in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a proposal for the methodology of developing rescue plans and the concepts of applying recommended response schedules in the context of the State Fire Service’s planning responsibilities (preparation) and public administration (reconciliation and approval), according to the legal order in force in Poland. In the proposed concept, recommended schedules are built on the basis of the matches and successes identified according to the criteria, i.e. the best carried out rescue actions from the register of reports.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on the analysis of existing legal status and policy in Poland as well as the selected relevant academic literature.

Findings

The result is the formulation of a methodology for drawing up the rescue plans to the extent required by law and proposing a concept for the method of developing and applying recommended response schedules, supporting operational planning and conducting rescue operations.

Practical implications

The proposed methodology is to support the procedure of drawing up rescue plans by implying and implementing them into IT solutions. The suggested recommended response schedules, based on observations and conclusions from the analysis of the past rescue operations, may present circumstances and sequences of the use of forces and measures that have had beneficial effects in the past. An in-depth analysis of historical data from the conducted rescue operations may also be used to determine time indicators for the response phase.

Originality/value

The proposed solutions complement the methods currently used by public administration in Poland. The concept can also be inspiring for the State Fire Service (PSP) which has its own analytical tools in the form of a decision support system and registers of rescue operations carried out. The PSP may undertake the practical verification of the presented methodology for preparing rescue plans and recommended response schedules.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2018

Muqiang Zheng, Chien-Chi Chu and Yenchun Jim Wu

With the continuous development and penetration of the Internet, there have been vast amounts of changes to the traditional method of classroom teaching. The massive open…

Abstract

With the continuous development and penetration of the Internet, there have been vast amounts of changes to the traditional method of classroom teaching. The massive open online course (MOOC) shows a significant combination of network information technology and educational resources. However, in order to make up for the disadvantages which occur when making transition from classroom to online learning such as ‘large-scale’ and ‘no feedback’, the Online-to-Offline (O2O) mode was created and developed. Using the course of ‘microeconomics’ taught by Chinese university professors as a reference, this chapter aims at explaining the course design and innovation which is a modification of the outcomes-based education (OBE) theory, the introduction of O2O teaching reform and application. The process is carried out by firstly setting the expected learning goal of this course on the basis of the OBE educational goal of the university, college and the major; secondly, designing this course with ‘online 311 class’ and ‘offline 271 course’; thirdly, implementing the O2O teaching model; and lastly, evaluating the teaching result in order to provide some enlightenment for the tryout of ‘MOOC+O2O’ and OBE theory under the Internet background.

Details

The Future of Innovation and Technology in Education: Policies and Practices for Teaching and Learning Excellence
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-555-5

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 21 November 2011

Valerie Leiter

Purpose – This chapter examines the foundations of community among youth with disabilities.Methodology – Qualitative data on 52 youth with disabilities were analyzed…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter examines the foundations of community among youth with disabilities.

Methodology – Qualitative data on 52 youth with disabilities were analyzed, based on interviews with the youth and their parents. The sample included youth with intellectual, hidden, physical, and sensory disabilities. Data analysis was guided by grounded theory.

Findings – Four foundations of community were identified: geographic, disability-based, religious, and virtual. Disability-based contexts provided much of the basis of friendship for youth with disabilities. Just under half of youth had community connections within their home towns.

Research limitations – These analyses rely on the self-reported and parent-reported experiences of 52 youth with disabilities in Massachusetts and are not representative of youth with disabilities nationwide. Only youth who were still in high school just before graduation are represented; those who dropped out earlier were not included.

Practical implications – Community connections create opportunities for friendship and for sharing information. Youth enjoyed their connections, whether they were formal (designed and created by adults) or informal (just hanging out with other local youth).

Social implications – Youth's connections with other youth with disabilities may result in bonding social capital, creating friendships, but there are fewer opportunities for bridging social capital, creating connections with typically developing youth.

Originality – This chapter provides an overview of youth's perceptions of their participation in various social and recreational activities and explores and conceptualizes the contexts in which youth with disabilities experience community connections with other youth.

Details

Disability and Community
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-800-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1982

CHARLES F. BROOK

THE ANCIENT and royal burgh of Stirling, at one time the capital of Scotland, was at the turn of the century the county town of Stirlingshire and the centre of a thriving…

Abstract

THE ANCIENT and royal burgh of Stirling, at one time the capital of Scotland, was at the turn of the century the county town of Stirlingshire and the centre of a thriving agricultural community. With the exception of a carpet and woollen mill and some neighbouring coal mines, there was little industry in the town. This was reflected in its social structure. There was growing up in the village of Raploch, beneath the castle rock, a sizeable Irish community of labourers and artisans, but of a population of around 20,000 in 1900, middle class businessmen and shopkeepers predominated. The town's structure in turn was reflected in the nature of the Town Council, which, although not always conservative in politics, was generally conservative when faced with innovation, be it a swimming pool or a modern town centre. This might explain why in Stirling the public library movement was late in starting, nearly 25 years after the Public Libraries (Scotland) Act of 1870 authorising the use for library purposes of 1 d. in the £ from the rates. It might also explain why there was some opposition from the Town Council to providing for the upkeep of the library after its foundation.

Details

Library Review, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1972

Muriel Hutton

ONE MUST BEGIN with Dickens. A chapter by Christopher Hibbert in Charles Dickens, 1812–1870: centenary volume, edited by E. W. F. Tomlin, and The London of Charles Dickens

Abstract

ONE MUST BEGIN with Dickens. A chapter by Christopher Hibbert in Charles Dickens, 1812–1870: centenary volume, edited by E. W. F. Tomlin, and The London of Charles Dickens, published by London Transport with aid from the Dickens Fellowship, make a similar study here superfluous; both are illustrated, the latter giving instructions for reaching surviving Dickensian buildings. Neither warns the reader of Dickens's conscious and unconscious imaginative distortion, considered in Humphrey House's The Dickens World. Dickens himself imagined Captain Cuttle hiding in Switzerland and Paul Dombey's wild waves saying ‘Paris’; ‘the association between the writing and the place of writing is so curiously strong in my mind.’ Author and character may be in two places at once. ‘I could not listen at my fireside, for five minutes to the outer noises, but it was borne into my ears that I was dead.’ (Our Mutual Friend)

Details

Library Review, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1957

HARRY C. BAUER

Many years ago a thrifty house‐wife presided over a men's boardinghouse near the campus of a well‐known American university. Often while planning daily menus, the hard…

Abstract

Many years ago a thrifty house‐wife presided over a men's boardinghouse near the campus of a well‐known American university. Often while planning daily menus, the hard pressed matron would appeal to her houseboy, “What shall we serve for dessert?” He persistently recommended, “Ice cream and cake,” but she invariably rejected this extravagant proposal, derisively reminding him, “The boys don't like ice cream and cake.” Then, with painstaking concern, she would judiciously select tapioca, chocolate pudding, or some other gelatinous concoc‐tion. Since all the young college students had ravenous appetites and greedily consumed anything set before them, they always confirmed the sagacious selections of the frugal dame. When anyone asked her what college boys liked most for dessert, she had her time‐proven answer, “Tapioca”. She knew that “the proof of the pudding is in the eating.”

Details

Library Review, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1950

THE announcement that Mr. James Wilkie, M.A., will be President of the Library Association for 1951 is gratifying, He has been for some years the honoured Secretary of the…

Abstract

THE announcement that Mr. James Wilkie, M.A., will be President of the Library Association for 1951 is gratifying, He has been for some years the honoured Secretary of the Carnegie Trust and before that was the officer at the Ministry of Education most nearly concerned with the public library. For many years now he has been a familiar figure at library conferences, and his geniality, Strong sense of humour and excellent speaking, have won him the esteem of librarians and others concerned with libraries. He almost invariably attends the meetings of the National Central Library. It is, therefore, appropriate that he should preside over the Library Association, which owes so much to him and the Trust he serves and in many activities represents. We wish him a pleasant year of office and can surely promise him the loyalty of librarians.

Details

New Library World, vol. 53 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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