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Article
Publication date: 11 December 2019

Saisanath G. and Subbaiyan Gnanasambandam

As an underlying entity in the discourses of privatisation of space, urban security and fear, boundary walls are considered as an impediment to the publicness of public…

Abstract

Purpose

As an underlying entity in the discourses of privatisation of space, urban security and fear, boundary walls are considered as an impediment to the publicness of public spaces. But, the inevitability and potential of their physical attributes and functions is indicative of the lack of systemic knowledge on how to approach boundary walls, so that they contribute positively to the quality of urban spaces. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Since boundary walls are constitutive of physical attributes that are embedded with multiple functions, the contribution of physical boundaries is premised on the interaction between objective and subjective measurements, explored in positive and ambiguous space types. In this study, the quality of physical boundaries is measured by an index and the perceived functions of the physical attributes of boundary walls are measured by a questionnaire survey.

Findings

This study found that positive and ambiguous space types not only affect the quality of physical boundaries but also the perceived functions of the physical attributes of boundary walls. Further, social and visual functions of boundary walls play a significant role in contributing positively to the quality of urban spaces.

Originality/value

By exploring the relation between quality of physical boundaries and their perceived functions, this study extends the meta-understanding of the role of boundary walls.

Details

Archnet-IJAR: International Journal of Architectural Research, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2631-6862

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Book part
Publication date: 28 February 2017

Neil Brown, Nicole Laliberte, Anna Alcaro, Morgan Pfeiffer and Warren Reed

We start from the assertion that the concept of “global citizenship” is neither simple nor stable. Rather, it is a contentious idea that is often uncritically based upon…

Abstract

We start from the assertion that the concept of “global citizenship” is neither simple nor stable. Rather, it is a contentious idea that is often uncritically based upon assumptions of the “global” and “citizenship” as positives. In geography, however, the “global” and how it relates to the idea of the “local” is a complex and debated concept. Drawing upon critical geographic theories of scale, we suggest that the concept of global citizenship should be thoroughly interrogated to understand its problems and paradoxes as well as its possibilities. In this chapter, we offer one such interrogation grounded in the experiences of designing and implementing the Parks and People experience. We identify tensions within the program such as how to sell the program, how to navigate between individual and group experiences, and how to simultaneously support one-time encounters and ongoing relationships. In exploring these tensions, we demonstrate how the everyday practices of “global citizenship” are enmeshed in uneven geographies of privilege. We suggest that our goal should not be to separate ourselves from such inequality, but, rather, to face the complexities of the relationships we are trying to foster in the name of promoting social justice.

Details

Engaging Dissonance: Developing Mindful Global Citizenship in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-154-4

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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2014

Anna Park, William Ickes and Rebecca L. Robinson

The purpose of this research is to (1) to identify personality variables that reliably predict verbal rudeness ( i.e by replicating previous findings) and (2) to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to (1) to identify personality variables that reliably predict verbal rudeness ( i.e by replicating previous findings) and (2) to investigate what personality variables predict more general ugly confrontational behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

In Study 1, the authors used an online survey to collect information regarding individual differences in social desirability, self-esteem, narcissism, blirtatiousness, behavioral inhibition, behavioral activation, conventional morality (CM), thin-skinned ego defensiveness (TSED), affect intensity for anger and frustration (AIAF), and verbal rudeness. In Study 2, the authors used a similar online survey to collect the same information, but extended the survey questionnaire to include measures of entitlement, psychopathology, Machiavellianism, and a retrospective checklist of ugly confrontational behaviors.

Findings

In Study 1, regression analyses revealed that CM, behavioral inhibition, and behavioral activation reward responsiveness were significant negative predictors of rudeness. AIAF, TSED and behavioral activation drive were significant positive predictors of rudeness. In Study 2, regression analyses revealed that CM was again a significant negative predictor of rudeness. AIAF, and narcissism were significant positive predictors of rudeness. CM also negatively predicted ugly confrontational behaviors, whereas AIAF, blirtatiousness, and Machiavellianism were positive predictors.

Originality/value

Although several measures of aggression exist, the current studies of rudeness and ugly confrontational behavior specifically assess tendencies to abuse strangers. These studies begin to establish a personality profile of the type of person that might abuse strangers.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2016

Anna Park, Rebecca L. Robinson, Meghan J Babcock and William Ickes

The purpose of this paper is to behaviorally validate the Rudeness Scale (RS), a self-report measure of the propensity to verbally abuse strangers, using both a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to behaviorally validate the Rudeness Scale (RS), a self-report measure of the propensity to verbally abuse strangers, using both a retrospective design (Study 1) and a prospective design (Study 2).

Design/methodology/approach

In Study 1, participants (n=280) completed an online survey that contained the RS and a retrospective checklist measure that assessed how often they had engaged in specific confrontational behaviors during the past year. In Study 2 (n=109), participants first completed an online survey that contained the RS and then later completed an experimental session in which they received, and immediately responded to, rude instant messages sent by another “participant.”

Findings

In Study 1, a multiple regression analysis revealed that scores on the RS were positively associated (β=0.39) with scores on the retrospective checklist measure of ugly confrontational behaviors. In Study 2, a multiple regression analysis revealed that scores on the RS were positively associated (β=0.30) with the level of “retaliatory” rude behavior the participants displayed in their instant messaging conversation. Together, these findings reveal that people with high RS scores are more likely, first, to have acted in offensive and confrontational ways in the past (Study 1), and second, to act this way in the present (Study 2).

Originality/value

Although previous studies have provided evidence for the convergent validity of the RS and established a preliminary personality profile of rude individuals, the present studies are the first to explore the behavioral validity of the scale.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2010

Min Gyung Kim, Chenya Wang and Anna S. Mattila

The goal of the present conceptual paper is to integrate two streams of literature related to service failures: customer complaining behaviors (CCB) and service recovery…

Abstract

Purpose

The goal of the present conceptual paper is to integrate two streams of literature related to service failures: customer complaining behaviors (CCB) and service recovery literature. The suggested conceptual framework intends to broaden the thinking on consumers' complaint handling processes for hospitality institutions.

Design/methodology/approach

A model is proposed that integrates the service recovery and CCB literatures under a single framework. A careful literature review is performed to justify the conceptual framework.

Findings

The framework offers a starting point for broadening the thinking on consumers' complaint handling processes.

Research limitations/implications

Systematic empirical research is needed to test the integrative model.

Originality/value

This paper offers insight for hospitality managers into how to effectively deal with dissatisfied customer experiences.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 22 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2014

Choongbeom Choi and Anna S. Mattila

The use of price-based promotions is common in the service industry due to their positive impact on sales in the short run. To gain a better understanding of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The use of price-based promotions is common in the service industry due to their positive impact on sales in the short run. To gain a better understanding of the effectiveness of various types of promotions, the current research aims to examine the contrasting effect of two popular framing methods (i.e. percentage-off versus dollars-off) on consumers' perceived savings and willingness to buy. More importantly, this research examines the moderating effect of personal sense of power on such relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used 2×2 between subjects quasi-experimental design to test the hypotheses. Respondents were asked to read a scenario regarding booking a hotel room and then complete scales that measured their perceptions of savings and willingness to book.

Findings

Results indicate that personal sense of power moderates the effects of the promotion frame on perceived savings and willingness to book. Individuals with a low sense of power perceive significantly more savings and exhibit significantly higher booking intentions when the promotion is framed in dollars-off rather than in percentage-off format. The framing manipulation, however, had minimal effects among high power individuals. In addition, the authors find that confidence in estimating the promoted price is the psychological mechanism that potentially explains the casual link from power to perceived savings and willingness to book.

Originality/value

Drawing on the social psychology theory, the current study discovered some boundary conditions for the framing effect in the context of pricing of services. In addition, the current research advances the theoretical understanding of power's psychological and behavioural effects in the context of price promotions.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Article
Publication date: 23 January 2009

Breffni M. Noone and Anna S. Mattila

Much of the research on crowding in a service context has focused on customer reaction to crowding in a retail setting. This paper seeks to examine the effect of consumer…

Abstract

Purpose

Much of the research on crowding in a service context has focused on customer reaction to crowding in a retail setting. This paper seeks to examine the effect of consumer goals on consumers' reactions to crowding for extended service encounters.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used a 2 (Crowding: crowded or not crowded) × 2 (Goal: utilitarian or hedonic) × 2 (Service level: bad or good) factorial, between‐subjects design to test hypotheses. Service level and tolerance for crowding were entered as control variables. A service encounter in a casual restaurant was used as the service setting in the study. Subjects were randomly assigned to a written scenario describing an experience in a restaurant. They were then shown a photograph depicting the interior of the restaurant.

Findings

Consumption goal moderates the effect of perceived crowding on satisfaction. Significantly lower satisfaction ratings are associated with a crowded service environment when the primary consumption goal for the service experience is utilitarian, rather than hedonic, in nature. Furthermore, regardless of the consumption goal, crowding negatively impacts positive in‐store behaviors (i.e. desire to spend more money and time at the restaurant).

Research limitations/implications

The study was limited to one extended service setting. Future research across other extended service settings is needed establish the generalizability of the findings.

Practical implications

The study has implications for the design of the service facility and the application of demand‐shifting revenue management strategies.

Originality/value

The paper extends the literature on shopping motivations to extended service settings by examining the effect of consumer goals on consumers' reactions to crowding, specifically consumer satisfaction with, and consumer behaviors within, the extended service encounter.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2010

Chen‐ya Wang and Anna S. Mattila

This study seeks to shed light on service providers' experiences and challenges during intercultural service encounters.

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to shed light on service providers' experiences and challenges during intercultural service encounters.

Design/methodology/approach

A grounded theory approach was used to explore a broad range of management issues regarding intercultural service encounters. A conceptual model was developed through interviews with current service providers.

Findings

The findings indicate that intercultural service encounters can serve as potential stressors for service providers and consequently induce negative emotions. While some service providers employ various coping techniques to address this situation, others tend to avoid international customers.

Originality/value

The intercultural service encounter has received little research attention despite its prevalence in daily life. The value of this paper contributes to the understanding of intercultural service encounters, particularly the challenges and stress employees could face.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2014

Lu Zhang, Peter Nyheim and Anna S. Mattila

This paper aims to examine the joint effect of power and gender on individuals’ perceptions and evaluations of information systems (IS), and their behavioral intentions of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the joint effect of power and gender on individuals’ perceptions and evaluations of information systems (IS), and their behavioral intentions of technology acceptance.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a 2 (powerful vs powerless) × 2 (female vs male) between-subject experimental design. A total of 128 subjects participated in the experiment.

Findings

The results suggest that there is a significant gender difference in terms of technology acceptance in the high-power condition. Further, such a gender difference is attenuated in the low-power condition. Specifically, when primed with the feeling of powerful, male users (vs female users) have higher computer self-efficacy and rate the IS as easier to use and more enjoyable. However, when the feeling of powerless was elicited, the effect of gender on technology acceptance disappeared.

Originality/value

The gender effect on technology acceptance has been widely studied. The current research extends the literature by considering the moderating effect of power on such a gender effect.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9880

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Article
Publication date: 13 September 2011

Chen‐ya Wang and Anna S. Mattila

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of culture (Western versus East Asian) on customers' perceived informational fairness of several types of failure…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of culture (Western versus East Asian) on customers' perceived informational fairness of several types of failure explanations – excuse, justification, reference, and apology. It also seeks to examine whether informational fairness influences post‐failure satisfaction and consequent loyalty intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

A two (culture: US and Taiwanese) × four (explanation type: excuse, justification, reference to other people, and penitence) between‐subjects experimental design was used to test the hypotheses. Participants were exposed to a written scenario describing a flight delay. A total of 286 undergraduate students served as the subject pool.

Findings

The findings of this study imply that customers from different cultures perceive service failure explanations somewhat differently. US customers perceive reference to other customers to be more just while Taiwanese customers perceive apology to be more just. Furthermore, such informational fairness influences satisfaction, and consequent loyalty intentions.

Research limitations/implications

Owing to the comparison of US and Taiwanese participants in this study, these results may not be applied to customers from other countries. Second, the stimuli involved service failures that are in the context of air travel. Third, though the student sample is appropriate for cross‐cultural research, it limits the generalizability of the study's findings.

Practical implications

The study findings indicate that explanations for service failures enhance customers' fairness perceptions, thus inducing loyalty. Yet, it is important for front‐line employees to keep in mind that customers' cultural backgrounds can affect their perceptions of specific types of explanations.

Originality/value

The findings of this study add to the evidence that culture is an important factor in determining the effectiveness of a service recovery effort. Specifically, this research shows cross‐cultural differences in informational fairness perceptions across various explanation types.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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