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Article

Lily Lee, Susanne Montgomery, Thelma Gamboa-Maldonado, Anna Nelson and Juan Carlos Belliard

The purpose of this paper is to assess perceptions of organizational readiness to integrate clinic-based community health workers (cCHWs) between traditional CHWs and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess perceptions of organizational readiness to integrate clinic-based community health workers (cCHWs) between traditional CHWs and potential cCHW employers and their staff in order to inform training and implementation models.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional mixed-methods approach evaluated readiness to change perceptions of traditional CHWs and potential employers and their staff. Quantitative methods included a printed survey for CHWs and online surveys in Qualtrics for employers/staff. Data were analyzed using SPSS software. Qualitative data were collected via focus groups and key informant interviews. Data were analyzed with NVIVO 11 Plus software.

Findings

CHWs and employers and staff were statistically different in their perceptions on appropriateness, management support and change efficacy (p<0.0001, 0.0134 and 0.0020, respectively). Yet, their differences lay within the general range of agreement for cCHW integration (4=somewhat agree to 6=strongly agree). Three themes emerged from the interviews which provided greater insight into their differences and commonalities: perspectives on patient-centered care, organizational systems and scope of practice, and training, experiences and expectations.

Originality/value

Community health workers serve to fill the gaps in the social and health care systems. They are an innovation as an emerging workforce in health care settings. Health care organizations need to learn how to integrate paraprofessionals such as cCHWs. Understanding readiness to adopt the integration of cCHWs into clinical settings will help prepare systems through trainings and adapting organizational processes that help build capacity for successful and sustainable integration.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

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Article

Anna Nelson

The purpose of this paper is to explore and develop appropriate responses to the workforce development needs of Aotearoa New Zealand Therapeutic Communities (TC).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore and develop appropriate responses to the workforce development needs of Aotearoa New Zealand Therapeutic Communities (TC).

Design/methodology/approach

Matua Raki took a workforce development design approach using principles of participatory/co-design.

Findings

A scoping exercise undertaken to explore the workforce development needs of Aotearoa New Zealand TC concluded that there was a shortage of addiction practitioners ready, willing and able to work in the TC environment and that a workforce development solution was desired by stakeholders. Following the scoping exercise a demand analysis found that there was a need for a TC training programme to be delivered in the Aotearoa New Zealand context. Outcome: a culturally appropriate TC training programme was developed in consultation with a wide range of stakeholders. The training programme was then piloted with a group of 23 practitioners. Evaluation of participant engagement and satisfaction indicated that the training programme was appropriate to both the needs of the workforce and the TC context.

Originality/value

The TC training, developed as a result of this workforce development design approach provides unique content and processes to meet the needs of the TC workforce in the New Zealand context.

Details

Therapeutic Communities: The International Journal of Therapeutic Communities, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-1866

Keywords

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Article

Mark C. Goniwiecha and David A. Hales

Americans have become increasingly interested in their ethnic heritage in recent years. Assimilated Euro‐Americans, whose ancestors arrived in the New World generations…

Abstract

Americans have become increasingly interested in their ethnic heritage in recent years. Assimilated Euro‐Americans, whose ancestors arrived in the New World generations ago, are rediscovering their roots and are enrolling in foreign language classes, taking up folk dancing, learning ethnic cuisine, tracing their genealogical pedigrees, and returning to the religious traditions their parents may or may not have passed on to them. Now it's “in” to be ethnic.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 16 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article

Michel M Haigh and Shelley Wigley

– The purpose of this paper is to (n=472) examine how negative, user-generated content on Facebook impacts stakeholders’ perceptions of the organization.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to (n=472) examine how negative, user-generated content on Facebook impacts stakeholders’ perceptions of the organization.

Design/methodology/approach

At Phase 1, stakeholders’ perceptions about the organization – public relationship, corporate social responsibility, attitude toward the organization, and reputation of the organization were assessed. A week later, at Phase 2, participants were exposed to negative Facebook comments. This study employed the theory of inoculation as a way to bolster stakeholders’ attitudes to protect against attitude shift following exposure to negative, user-generated comments.

Findings

Paired sample t-tests indicate stakeholders’ perceptions of the organization – public relationship and corporate social responsibility significantly decrease after stakeholders read negative, user-generated content. The pattern of means supports the idea inoculation can prevent against attitude shift.

Practical implications

Strategic communication professionals should be aware of the impact negative posts can have and develop a strategy to respond to negative comments on Facebook.

Originality/value

There is limited experimental research examining the impact of negative Facebook posts on stakeholders. It extends current literature and provides practitioners with some guidance on the impact of negative, user-generated content.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

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Article

Anna Bedford, Kristina Vojvoda, Le Ma and Nelson Ma

This research letter outlines the “AFAANZ shark pitch 2020” research journey and reflects on the application of the pitch template to the authors’ research topic on…

Abstract

Purpose

This research letter outlines the “AFAANZ shark pitch 2020” research journey and reflects on the application of the pitch template to the authors’ research topic on innovation, future profitability and stock returns.

Design/methodology/approach

This study begins by outlining how the research started, followed by the choice of authors’ replication study. This study then outlines the authors’ interactions with the corresponding author of the original study and the journal editor. The authors also detail their personal journey of using the pitch template.

Findings

The pitch template facilitated the identification of a replication study that has significant impact in informing Australian policy decisions. It allowed the authors to succinctly articulate and refine their research ideas.

Originality/value

This research letter highlights authors’ mistakes in using the pitch template and what they learned from interacting with the original authors and journal editor.

Details

Accounting Research Journal, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1030-9616

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Article

Anna Larsson

The purpose of this paper is to examine ideas and notions in the founding and development of the area of mental health services in school in Sweden, with special focus on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine ideas and notions in the founding and development of the area of mental health services in school in Sweden, with special focus on school psychology and school social work.

Design/methodology/approach

From a history of thought perspective, this paper investigates public Swedish school-related documents from the early 1900s up until the 1980s in order to reveal the influential ideas about school health care, children’s needs, and professionals’ responsibilities. These ideas are linked to the twentieth century development of the behavioural sciences, the school system, and the welfare state in Sweden.

Findings

Two main turning points are identified. The first occurred in the 1940s when psychologists and social workers were invited to become part of schools as experts on children’s mental health care, implying that mental health issues had become included in the school’s responsibility. The second turning point came in the 1970s when the tasks and the ideational context for the mental health experts changed dramatically. The first turning point challenged the dominant explanation model, a model that relied on scientific references to medicine, and eventually led to an acceptance of psychology instead as dominant provider of explanatory models. The second turning point affected the tension between child and system, and implied a subordination of the needs of the system for the benefit of the needs of the child.

Originality/value

This paper highlights how views on children’s needs and on the responsibilities of school and its professionals have been constructed and conceptualised differently over time and how those views are connected to changes in science, school, and society.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 46 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

Keywords

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Article

Jonathan Jones, Céline Souchay, Chris Moulin, Shirley Reynolds and Anna-Lynne Adlam

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) is an evidence-based treatment for common mental health problems that affect children, young people and adults. The suitability of CBT…

Abstract

Purpose

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) is an evidence-based treatment for common mental health problems that affect children, young people and adults. The suitability of CBT for children has been questioned because it requires children to think about their thoughts, feelings and behaviours. The purpose of this paper is to investigate which cognitive and affective capacities predict children’s ability to relate thoughts, feelings and behaviours.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 59 typically developing children aged between 8 and 11 years took part in the study. CBT skills were assessed on a story task that required children to relate the character’s thoughts to their feelings and behaviours. Children also completed an assessment of IQ, a feeling-of-knowing metamemory task that assessed metacognition, and a higher-order theory of mind task. Furthermore, parents rated their child’s empathy on the children’s empathy quotient.

Findings

The findings suggest that CBT is developmentally appropriate for 8–11 year old children; however, young children and children with mental health problems may have impaired metacognition and CBT skills. Metacognition and empathy may moderate the efficacy of child CBT and warrant further investigation in clinical trials.

Originality/value

This study provides evidence for the cognitive and affective skills that might predict the outcome of CBT in children. Metacognition and empathy predict children’s ability to relate thoughts, feelings and behaviours, and therefore may moderate the efficacy of CBT.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

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Book part

Anna Sparrman and Karin Aronsson

David Buckingham (1998, 2000) has recently argued against rigid dichotomies in the contemporary study of commercial artefacts and childhood culture. On the one hand…

Abstract

David Buckingham (1998, 2000) has recently argued against rigid dichotomies in the contemporary study of commercial artefacts and childhood culture. On the one hand, children are seen as easy victims of commercial exploitation from big companies, and on the other, they are seen as highly competent agents, immune to any outside influence. Both views feature different types of romanticism. The view of children as victims is partly created around Victorian ideas of childhood innocence, whereas the romantic view of the active child sees children as open, creative, and competent learners, who effortlessly acquire new literacies, including media literacies. Such a view is partly implicitly inscribed into the Swedish School Curriculum (1998) (Läroplan för det obligatoriska skolväsendet, förskoleklassen och fritidshemmet. Lpo 94. [Curriculum for the compulsory school, the pre-school class and the after-school centre. Lpo 94]). In his criticism of the passive-active dichotomy, Buckingham argues in favour of studies of actual practices, that is, what young people actually do with artefacts and media, instead of empty speculations, far away from children’s play arenas. Buckingham’s own studies are mainly based on group interviews with children in the U.K., where he has analysed what was said on a micro level. A fundamental principle in his research is that children’s agency can be seen in their language use. Also, he advocates that we contextualize children’s activities by analysing the social processes of which they form a part. One way of doing this is to relate a study of children’s everyday interactions to media debates and to changes in our views of children as social agents (Buckingham, 1994).

Details

Investigating Educational Policy Through Ethnography
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-018-0

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Article

Anna Katrine Hougaard

Architectural drawing is changing because architects today draw with computers. Due to this change digital diagrams employed by computational architectural practices are…

Abstract

Architectural drawing is changing because architects today draw with computers. Due to this change digital diagrams employed by computational architectural practices are often emphasized as powerful structures of control and organisation in the design process. But there are also diagrams, which do not follow computational logic worth paying attention to. In the following I will investigate one such other kind of diagram, a sketch diagram, which has a play-like capacity where rules can be invented and changed as you go. In that way, sketch diagrams are related to steered indeterminacy and authorial ways of directing behaviour of artefacts and living things without controlling this behaviour completely. I analyse a musical composition by John Cage as an example of a sketch diagram, and then hypothesize that orthogonal, architectural drawing can work in similar ways. Thereby I hope to point out important affordance of architectural drawing as a ¬hybrid between the openness of hand-sketching and the rule-basedness of diagramming, an affordance which might be useful in the migrational zone of current architectural drawing where traditional hand drawing techniques and computer drawing techniques are being combined with each other.

Details

Open House International, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Advances in Global Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-297-6

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