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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2020

Anna Bos-Nehles, Beatrice Van der Heijden, Maarten Van Riemsdijk and Jan Kees Looise

Many HRM practices are never thoroughly implemented, or are implemented ineffectively. To better understand what line managers need to implement HRM practices effectively…

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Abstract

Purpose

Many HRM practices are never thoroughly implemented, or are implemented ineffectively. To better understand what line managers need to implement HRM practices effectively, the authors have developed and validated a psychometrically sound measurement instrument dealing with line managers' attributions for effective HRM implementation. Based on the theory of causal attributions, the authors distinguish between internal and external attributions that determine how line managers implement HRM practices on the work floor.

Design/methodology/approach

A multidimensional approach has been used, and, after collecting data from 471 line managers, thorough scale development guidelines and validation procedures have been applied for instrument development.

Findings

The instrument's psychometric qualities have been assessed by calculating the reliability and validity of line managers' internal attributions – including its composing dimensions of desire and competences – and their external attributions – including the dimensions of support, capacity and policy and procedures. In particular, both convergent and discriminant validity as well as intra-class correlations have been established. The newly developed measures are found to be of good quality. The scales appear to discriminate well between the distinguished groups and show a good variation within groups.

Practical implications

The developed measurement instrument helps HRM professionals to better understand line managers' attributions to effectively implement HRM practices and to provide them with support and training for effective HRM implementation.

Originality/value

Previous research has already identified weaknesses in HRM implementation, but lacked addressing the causes of this. The study presents antecedents for HRM implementation effectiveness, based on the causal attribution theory, and a psychometrically validated instrument to measure these antecedents.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 42 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 17 April 2020

Maarten Renkema, Anna Bos-Nehles and Jeroen Meijerink

Organisations increasingly implement self-managing teams (SMTs) to empower their employees. By drawing from the HRM process model and multilevel thinking, this paper…

Abstract

Purpose

Organisations increasingly implement self-managing teams (SMTs) to empower their employees. By drawing from the HRM process model and multilevel thinking, this paper explores how the HRM function changes in terms of actors and activities when introducing SMTs.

Design/methodology/approach

An in-depth, multilevel case study was conducted at a large healthcare organisation in The Netherlands, making use of 70 interviews, document analysis and observations.

Findings

The findings show that SMTs transform the HRM function by changing the responsibilities of teams, HRM professionals and line managers in the implementation of HRM activities. The analysis shows that many HRM responsibilities are devolved to SMTs, which are supported by the HRM department.

Research limitations/implications

These changes in the HRM function influence the HRM implementation process and provide all actors with new roles and activities. Based on these findings, this paper presents an inductive model of HRM implementation.

Practical implications

The findings help HRM practitioners to transform the HRM function when deciding to introduce SMTs.

Originality/value

This article is one of the first that empirically explores how the HRM function changes as a consequence of introducing SMTs. This is important because more and more organisations are adopting SMTs, while knowledge about the role of HRM is lacking.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

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Article
Publication date: 26 January 2021

Holger Schiele, Anna Bos-Nehles, Vincent Delke, Peter Stegmaier and Robbert-Jan Torn

Industrial revolutions have been induced by technological advances, but fundamentally changed business and society. To gain a comprehensive understanding of the fourth…

Abstract

Purpose

Industrial revolutions have been induced by technological advances, but fundamentally changed business and society. To gain a comprehensive understanding of the fourth industrial revolution (I4.0) and derive guidelines for business strategy, it is, therefore, necessary to explore it as a multi-facet phenomenon. Most literature on I4.0, however, takes up a predominantly technical view. This paper aims to report on a project discussing a holistic view on I4.0 and its implications, covering technology, business, society and people.

Design/methodology/approach

Two consecutive group discussions in form of academic world cafés have been conducted. The first workshop gathered multi-disciplinary experts from academia, whose results were further validated in a subsequent workshop including industry representatives. A voting procedure was used to capture participants perspectives.

Findings

The paper develops a holistic I4.0 vision, focusing on five core technologies, their business potential, societal requests and people implications. Based on the model a checklist has been developed, which firms can use a tool to analyze their firm’s situation and draft their industry 4.0 business strategy.

Originality/value

Rather than focusing on technology alone – which by itself is unlikely to make up for a revolution – this research integrates the entire system. In this way, a tool-set for strategy design results.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2018

Maarten Renkema, Tanya Bondarouk and Anna Bos-Nehles

Although self-management is not a new phenomenon, there is a lack of understanding about how to transform organizations towards self-managing teams (SMTs). The purpose of…

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1366

Abstract

Purpose

Although self-management is not a new phenomenon, there is a lack of understanding about how to transform organizations towards self-managing teams (SMTs). The purpose of this paper is to propose a guiding framework for how the empowerment process can be managed.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper sets out 12 guidelines on how to address the transition towards SMTs based on a case study at a large Dutch healthcare organization. The lessons are drawn from observations, documents and more than 55 interviews with key informants.

Findings

This paper provides a holistic overview of lessons learned from the transformation process towards SMTs. The 12 recommendations are targeted at four stakeholder groups, namely, the management/board, HRM department, coach-managers and members of the SMTs.

Originality/value

The originality lies in the systematic approach including lessons learned for all levels of the organization.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 October 2017

Anna Bos-Nehles, Maarten Renkema and Maike Janssen

Although we know that HRM practices can have a huge impact on employees’ innovative work behaviour (IWB), we do not know exactly which practices make the difference and…

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19679

Abstract

Purpose

Although we know that HRM practices can have a huge impact on employees’ innovative work behaviour (IWB), we do not know exactly which practices make the difference and how they affect IWB. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to determine the best HRM practices for boosting IWB, to understand the theoretical reasons for this, and to discover mediators and moderators in the relationship between HRM practices and IWB.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a systematic review of the literature, the authors carried out a content analysis on 27 peer-reviewed journal articles.

Findings

Working with the definitions and items provided in the articles, the authors were able to cluster HRM practices according to the ability-motivation-opportunity framework. The best HRM practices for enhancing IWB are training and development, reward, job security, autonomy, task composition, job demand, and feedback.

Practical implications

The results of this study provide practical information for HRM professionals aiming to develop an HRM system that generates innovative employee behaviours that might help build an innovative climate.

Originality/value

A framework is presented that aggregates the findings and clarifies which HRM practices influence IWB and how these relationships can be explained.

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2016

Tanya Bondarouk, Anna Bos-Nehles and Xanthe Hesselink

The purpose of this paper is to identify the differences and similarities in the HRM frames of middle-level managers and HR professionals, and to uncover the roots and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the differences and similarities in the HRM frames of middle-level managers and HR professionals, and to uncover the roots and contents of (dis)agreements in the HRM frames among HR professionals and middle-level managers.

Design/methodology/approach

An explorative case study performed in a Dutch homecare organization explored the reasons for the different roots and dynamics of the cognitive frames of HR professionals and middle-level managers.

Findings

The research shows that these differences originate in the lack of clarity concerning the experienced philosophy and goals of HRM, leading to different client foci, in the inertia- and intuition-based execution of HRM practices and in the seemingly large distance between central and local HRM administrative functions. The alignment of HRM frames developed from being congruent in the HRM vision towards incongruence in daily HRM execution.

Originality/value

This research confirms that HR professionals and middle-level managers have different HRM frames that encompass knowledge, assumptions and expectations. Congruent thinking by both social groups can lead to a better HRM system and to changes in HRM processes, enabling easier progress.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Human Resource Management, Social Innovation and Technology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-130-5

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Book part
Publication date: 14 August 2014

Anna Bos-Nehles and Maarten Van Riemsdijk

The social innovation of devolving HRM responsibilities to line managers results in many debates about how well they implement HRM practices. The implementation…

Abstract

Purpose

The social innovation of devolving HRM responsibilities to line managers results in many debates about how well they implement HRM practices. The implementation constraints line managers perceive in their HRM role are researched by taking organisational contingencies into consideration.

Design/Methodology/Approach

We present four case studies in which our findings are based on quantitative and qualitative data from the cases. The qualitative data allow us to explain some of our quantitative results in terms of organisational differences.

Findings

The HRM implementation effectiveness as perceived by line managers depends on the line managers’ span of control, his/her education level and experience and his/her hierarchical position in the organisation. Each HRM implementation constraint knows additional organisational contingencies.

Research Limitations/Implications

We did not consider possible influences of one organisational characteristic on another, and the effect of this combined effect on the HRM implementation factors. In order to overcome this limitation, we would suggest using a structural equation model (SEM) in future research.

Practical Implications

This chapter offers HR professionals solutions on how to structure the organisation and design the HRM role of line managers in order to implement HRM practices effectively.

Social Implications

We see many differences on how HRM implementation is managed in organisations. This chapter offers solutions to policy makers on how to equalise the HRM role of line managers.

Originality/Value

The focus of this chapter is on the line manager (instead of HR managers) as implementer of HRM and the impact of organisational contingencies on HRM implementation.

Details

Human Resource Management, Social Innovation and Technology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-130-5

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 16 July 2018

Abstract

Details

Organisational Roadmap Towards Teal Organisations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-311-7

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Book part
Publication date: 14 August 2014

Abstract

Details

Human Resource Management, Social Innovation and Technology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-130-5

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