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Article
Publication date: 24 September 2020

Anna Abelsson, Jari Appelgren and Christer Axelsson

The purpose was to investigate what effect an intervention of low-dose, high-frequency cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training with feedback for one month would have…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose was to investigate what effect an intervention of low-dose, high-frequency cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training with feedback for one month would have on professionals' subjective self-assessment skill of CPR.

Design/methodology/approach

This study had a quantitative approach. In total, 38 firefighters performed CPR for two minutes on a Resusci Anne QCPR. They then self-assessed their CPR through four multiple-choice questions regarding compression rate, depth, recoil and ventilation volume. After one month of low-dose, high-frequency training with visual feedback, the firefighters once more performed CPR and self-assessed their CPR.

Findings

With one month of low-dose, high-frequency training with visual feedback, the level of self-assessment was 87% (n = 33) correct self-assessment of compression rate, 95% (n = 36) correct self-assessment of compression depth, 68% (n = 26) correct self-assessment of recoil and 87% (n = 33) correct self-assessment of ventilations volume. The result shows a reduced number of firefighters who overestimate their ability to perform CPR.

Originality/value

With low-dose, high-frequency CPR training with visual feedback for a month, the firefighters develop a good ability to self-assess their CPR to be performed within the guidelines. By improving their ability to self-assess their CPR quality, firefighters can self-regulate their compression and ventilation quality.

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

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Article
Publication date: 12 December 2018

Anna Abelsson

The purpose of this paper is to describe firefighters’ experiences of first response emergency care.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe firefighters’ experiences of first response emergency care.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses an explorative descriptive design with a qualitative approach. Data were collected through group interviews of 35 firefighters and subjected to qualitative content analysis.

Findings

The results showed that the professional role and the firemen’s uniform serve as a protection against psychologically strenuous situations. To protect the dignity of the injured or dead is important as well as protecting and safeguarding each other from the experience of the tragedy of an accident. Having a solid, sterling medical education provides a sense of security in the emergency care, as well as when caring for the relatives. Debriefing brings thoughts and feelings to the surface for processing and closure. The feeling of sadness lingers for the people not being saveable, that had been dead on arrival or the ones forgotten.

Originality/value

A firefighter’s work situation is exposed and stressful. The firemen’s uniform as a mental barrier, colleagues, time to mentally prepare and to be allowed to show feelings are all needed to cope. It is, therefore, important to encourage, promote and strengthen the protective role of camaraderie for the firefighter, which probably can be emphasized in other uniform-wearing professions such as police, military and ambulance. Being acknowledged for their contribution to other peoples’ lives and well-being can acknowledge the firefighters’ importance.

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2018

Anna Abelsson, Jari Appelgren and Christer Axelsson

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of the intervention of low-dose, high-frequency cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training with feedback for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of the intervention of low-dose, high-frequency cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training with feedback for firefighters for one month.

Design/methodology/approach

The study had a quantitative approach. Data were collected through an intervention by means of simulation. The data collection consisted of a pre- and post-assessment of 38 firefighter’s CPR performance.

Findings

There was a statistically significant improvement from pre- to post-assessment regarding participants’ compression rates. Compression depth increased statistically significantly to average 2 mm too deep in the group. Recoil decreased in the group with an average of 1 mm for the better. There was a statistically significant improvement in participants’ ventilation volume from pre- to post-assessment.

Originality/value

Prehospital staff such as firefighters, police, and ambulance perform CPR under less than optimal circumstances. It is therefore of the utmost importance that these professionals are trained in the best possible way. The result of this study shows that low-dose, high-frequency CPR training with an average of six training sessions per month improves ventilation volume, compression depth, rate, and recoil. This study concludes that objective feedback during training enhances the firefighters’ CPR skills which in turn also could be applied to police and ambulance CPR training.

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2012

Andreas Hanning, Anna Priem Abelsson, Ulrika Lundqvist and Magdalena Svanström

The aim of this study is to contribute to the quality improvement and long‐term strategic development of education for sustainable development (ESD) in engineering…

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to contribute to the quality improvement and long‐term strategic development of education for sustainable development (ESD) in engineering education curricula.

Design/methodology/approach

The content in 70 courses in environment and SD were characterized and quantified using course document text analysis. Additionally, two questionnaires were sent to students and alumni at Chalmers, and interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with representatives from 16 Swedish companies and five organizations.

Findings

It was found that industry demands a broader range of competences in SD amongst engineers in general than what is currently provided. In total, 35 per cent of alumni claim they encounter sustainability issues from sometimes to daily in their work. However, only half of them believe they possess enough competences to make decisions from a sustainability perspective. Quantity, coverage and the level of integration in the educational programme all appear to be important for the students' perceived competences on SD and for the importance that they put on achieving SD.

Originality/value

Earlier research has reported on how to further develop the idea and design of ESD and on competence needs in general. Few attempts have been made to assess industry's needs of competences in SD. This paper sheds light on how engineering universities educate for SD and benchmarks this to industry's needs in an exploratory case study, using Chalmers as an example.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 April 2019

Paresh Wankhade and DeMond S. Miller

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199

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

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