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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2019

Liqun Xiang, Ann T.W. Yu, Yongtao Tan, Xuezhu Shan and QiPing Shen

This study aims to identify senior citizens’ requirements related to “embedded retirement facilities (ERFs)”, which are small-scale, multi-functional and community-based…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify senior citizens’ requirements related to “embedded retirement facilities (ERFs)”, which are small-scale, multi-functional and community-based care facilities for senior citizens in mainland China, and to discuss whether senior citizens’ perceptions are influenced by their backgrounds.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire type of research was administrated to gain senior citizens’ rankings of services that should be provided by ERFs. Non-parametric statistical models were applied to analyse the collected data.

Findings

Results reveal that health care services for senior citizens are considered the most important. Requirements regarding rehabilitation and entertainment and daily life assistance are ranked second and third, respectively. Culture-related activities are the least important. Differences in the senior citizens’ background also influence their choices.

Research limitations/implications

This research is based on a questionnaire survey completed in northeast China. Opinions from other areas of mainland China will be collected in the future study. Furthermore, the key items identified in this research, which was completed by participants from the built environment discipline, can be further elaborated by combining interdisciplinary feedback.

Practical implications

This study explores services that are supposedly provided by ERFs. Findings will provide useful perceptions from senior citizens and will enable decision makers to prioritise services for senior citizens.

Social implications

Although senior citizens are the end users of ERFs, their needs are easily overlooked. This study calls attention to their needs from ERFs, and the results are likely to serve as references for stakeholders in building improved facilities.

Originality/value

ERFs have been provided in mainland China to cater to senior citizens’ needs since 2014. However, few studies have identified senior citizens’ requirements for provided services. The survey-based results of this work will serve as references for various stakeholders in making enhanced decisions.

Details

Facilities , vol. 38 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Albert P.C. Chan, Linda C.N. Fan and Ann T.W. Yu

A reengineering philosophy for the construction industry has emerged, harvesting components of a production philosophy. The objective of construction process reengineering…

Abstract

A reengineering philosophy for the construction industry has emerged, harvesting components of a production philosophy. The objective of construction process reengineering is to progressively develop an integrated project delivery process focusing on optimising process predictability and enhancing the value of the final product. This philosophy requires a holistic approach to reengineering, integrating the concepts of concurrent engineering, lean production and process redesign into the construction process. The objective of this paper provides an overview of construction process reengineering (CPR) through the examination of its origin, definition, concepts and application. A hospital project was used as a pilot case study to examine the application of the CPR concepts.

Details

Logistics Information Management, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6053

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

C.S. Poon, Ann T.W. Yu and L.H. Ng

Hong Kong is running out of both reclamation sites and landfill space for the disposal of construction and demolition waste. This paper reports on the findings of a study…

Abstract

Hong Kong is running out of both reclamation sites and landfill space for the disposal of construction and demolition waste. This paper reports on the findings of a study, consisting of a questionnaire survey, interviews and work‐site visits, to compare the use of low‐waste building technologies in public housing and private residential projects in Hong Kong. The results show that large panel formwork and prefabricated building components are widely used in public housing projects in Hong Kong. Due to the difference of the design with public housing, the use of smaller aluminium panel formwork is more common in the private housing projects. The barriers for the adoption of low‐waste building technologies in the private sector are identified and discussed.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2010

Ann T.W. Yu, Edwin H.W. Chan, Daniel W.M. Chan, Patrick T.I. Lam and Peony W.L. Tang

This paper aims to investigate the prevailing practice of managing client requirements for design and build (D&B) construction projects in Hong Kong. It attempts to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the prevailing practice of managing client requirements for design and build (D&B) construction projects in Hong Kong. It attempts to evaluate the limitations and addresses the need for a practical framework for facilitating the implementation of client requirements management within the industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Two research instruments were used in this paper: semi‐structured interviews and case studies.

Findings

The study revealed that the limitations of the current practice included the lack of a comprehensive client's project brief, inadequate involvement of client in the briefing process, the lack of impartial agents, the controversy caused by the uncertain legal status of end‐users and the improper timing of raising requirements by key project stakeholders. Recommendations are given that an inclusive project brief is necessary in clarifying the goals and covering all‐rounded perspectives. A practical framework is needed to improve the client requirements management practice within the construction industry.

Research limitations/implications

The D&B procurement system adopted in Hong Kong actually exists in various forms within the construction industry, which differ from the prototype that has long been recognized. Therefore, a more detailed study into D&B projects covering a broader area is necessary in the future.

Originality/value

Little research work has been undertaken on the study of client requirements management, especially for D&B construction projects. This paper has improved the comprehension of the nature of client requirements and has provided valuable insights into the prevailing problems associated with the management of client requirements.

Details

Facilities, vol. 28 no. 13/14
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 29 March 2013

Ann T.W. Yu and Geoffrey Q.P. Shen

This paper aims to focus on requirements management of projects constructed under traditional procurement system. It seeks to discuss the requirements management processes…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to focus on requirements management of projects constructed under traditional procurement system. It seeks to discuss the requirements management processes highlighting the limitations and addressing the need for a practical framework for facilitating the implementation of requirements management in the construction industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Two research instruments were used in this paper: semi‐structured interviews and case studies.

Findings

The literature review introduced a generic process for requirements management practice potentially to be adopted in the construction industry. The research study identified that the processes and limitations of current practice included the lack of a practical framework, misinterpretation of requirements, difficulties in identifying requirements, conflicts between expectation and constraints, complex hierarchy of client's organisation and communication problems in eliciting client requirements. Recommendations are given that an inclusive project brief and a competent project manager to manage the project requirements are necessary in capturing and tracing the requirements during the project development process. A practical framework is needed to improve the requirements management practice within the construction industry.

Research limitations/implications

The research findings establish the basis for further research to examine the implementation of these potential solutions and development of a systematic framework for RsM. The research is of significant value to the construction industry where value generation is essential and critical, especially in difficult economic and financial situations.

Originality/value

Requirements are the foundation of the projects which are critical to the successful delivery of the projects. Although many guidelines have been published for managing client requirements, the existing practice on requirements management is still considered to be inadequate. This research provides insight for professional practitioners in the construction industry to improve the requirements management practices for development projects.

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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2010

Ann T.W. Yu, Geoffrey Q.P. Shen and Edwin H.W. Chan

The purpose of this paper is to explore existing problems and potential solutions of managing Employers' Requirements in the project development process of construction…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore existing problems and potential solutions of managing Employers' Requirements in the project development process of construction projects under traditional procurement systems.

Design/methodology/approach

Two research instruments are used: semi‐structured interview and questionnaire survey, to investigate the problems and potential solutions to Requirements Management in the construction industry.

Findings

The research revealed that Requirements Management is crucial to the successful delivery of construction projects. However, the current practice of Requirements Management in the industry is informal and there is a lack of a systematic approach to tackle the problems. The authors also propose potential solutions to Requirements Management as well as a vision for further research.

Practical implications

The paper presents the problems of managing Employers' Requirements, and the potential solutions to improve the Requirements Management process that need to be addressed.

Originality/value

The paper improves one's comprehension of the nature, characteristics, problems and potential solutions of Requirements Management in the project development process under the traditional procurement systems in the construction industry, relevant to both practitioners and scholars. A model is proposed as a “preliminary framework” to show the processes involved.

Details

Facilities, vol. 28 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2012

Geoffrey Qiping Shen and Ann T.W. Yu

The purpose of this paper is to review the development of value management (VM) over the last few decades and propose ways for future development.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the development of value management (VM) over the last few decades and propose ways for future development.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative research methodology was adopted which involved a comprehensive review of relevant literature leading to a better understanding of the history and development of VM. A way forward is suggested for the future development of VM.

Findings

The research revealed that sustainable development is an area which has great potential for the application of a VM methodology in the construction industry in order to ensure sustainable design and development is leveraged during the life span of construction projects.

Originality/value

The research work described in this paper encourages researchers and practitioners to integrate VM and sustainable development. It enables the VM community to have a better understanding of applying VM techniques to address “green building” issues and the potential of applying VM to promote sustainability in buildings.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Article
Publication date: 28 April 2014

Patrick T.I. Lam, Edwin H.W. Chan, Ann T.W. Yu, Wynn C.N. Cam and Jack S. Yu

This paper aims to investigate how unique features of built facilities would affect the application of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions trading, and to explore what adaptive…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate how unique features of built facilities would affect the application of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions trading, and to explore what adaptive measures may be taken for emissions trading to be applied to the built environment. Emissions trading is a financial tool to encourage GHG emissions reduction in various industries. As the building sector is responsible for a large amount of GHG emissions, it is valuable to explore the application of emissions trading in built facilities.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis is based on a comparative study reviewing the current emissions trading schemes (ETSs) in Australia, Japan and the UK covering the building industry, and to evaluate the approaches adopted by the schemes to tackle the problems related to buildings and facilities management.

Findings

The research findings reveal that the small energy savings of individual building units, the large variety of energy-saving technologies and the split incentives and diverse interests of building owners and tenants would be the barriers hindering the development of emissions trading. To overcome these barriers, an ETS should allow its participants to group individual energy savings, lower the complexity of monitoring and reporting approaches and allow owners and tenants to benefit from emissions trading.

Originality/value

This article provides a comprehensive overview of the current emissions trading practices in the built environment. Besides, it raises the attention and consciousness of policymakers to the need that building characteristics and facilities management should be taken into consideration when designing an ETS for the building sector.

Details

Facilities, vol. 32 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Ann T.W. Yu, Qiping Shen, John Kelly and Kirsty Hunter

To describe a research project which seeks to establish a value management framework for project briefing to systematically identify and clarify client requirements, and…

Abstract

Purpose

To describe a research project which seeks to establish a value management framework for project briefing to systematically identify and clarify client requirements, and represent these requirements precisely and explicitly to facilitate the design process.

Design/methodology/approach

Two research instruments are used: structured questionnaire survey to validate the theoretical framework established; and experiments to test the proposed value management framework with real‐life projects, supported by case studies.

Findings

The primary research findings of this project are the identification of 13 variables that have an impact on the briefing process, which form the basis of the theoretical framework. It is revealed that the theoretical foundation of the research supports the use of value management to the briefing process. Further validation will be completed by conducting questionnaire survey and real‐life case studies.

Originality/value

This paper improves comprehension of the nature, characteristics and problems of the briefing process. It also introduces the theoretical foundation of the research project and describes the process for the development of the value management framework for project briefing.

Details

Facilities, vol. 23 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Abstract

Details

Facilities, vol. 24 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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